Workshop schedule for All

Friday 4:30PM - 6:00PM

#BeBoldEndHyde: The Movement to End the Hyde Amendment
For 40 years, the Hyde Amendment has targeted poor people, people of color and young people by banning abortion coverage from Medicaid--condemning many to unsafe procedures or unwanted pregnancies. Women of color in the reproductive justice movement have risen up to take on Hyde and, with it, 40 years of stigma and silence. In the last 5 years, All* Above All introduced the EACH Woman Act, proactive state & local policies, built relationships with the economic justice movement, and mobilized thousands of grassroots supporters. Until recently, both political parties routinely negotiated away abortion coverage--former President Obama referred to Hyde as an “institution”. This year, for the first time, Democratic candidates and the Democratic Platform are calling for the repeal of Hyde. Learn how our leaders, hungry for change, are braving a political hornet’s nest and how you can ensure the end of Hyde.
Speakers (click to view): Morgan Hopkins (She/Her), Bianca Campbell (She/Her and They/Them), Tabitha Skervin (Zie/Zir)

#BeBoldEndHyde: The Movement to End the Hyde Amendment

Speakers

Morgan Hopkins (She/Her)

Morgan Hopkins creates synthesis between the state, federal, and field work of the All* Above All public education campaign. Previously, she worked at the National Network of Abortion Funds. Morgan has a B.A. with Honors in Psychology from Hobart and William Smith Colleges and a Masters in Psychology with a certificate in Women's Studies from the University of Houston-Clear Lake. She is a proud member of the #BeyHive.

Groups audience: 

Bianca Campbell (She/Her and They/Them)

Bianca Campbell works with the National Network of Abortion Funds, prompting members to not only fund abortion, provide rides and lodging -- but also to build power that wins the hearts, minds and support of communities and shifts policy. Locally, she helps grow the Access Reproductive Care - Southeast as well!

Groups audience: 

Tabitha Skervin (Zie/Zir)

Tabitha Skervin is a Jamaican-born femme living on occupied Lenni-Lenape territory (i.e. Philadelphia). For the past 7 years, Tabitha has been organizing for environmental and social justice, grounding zir’s approach in a vision for collective liberation. Tabitha is currently Community Mobilization Coordinator at Women's Medical Fund, leading the fund’s advocacy efforts to eliminate all barriers to abortion access.

Groups audience: 

A Pocketbook Issue: Abortion Access is Economic Justice

Join our panel of activists working at state and national levels as they discuss their exciting work at the intersections of reproductive justice and economic justice. Presenters from the All* Above All campaign and National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health will discuss current campaign work for the #FightFor15, dignity for young parents, and efforts to repeal the Hyde amendment with the groundbreaking EACH Woman Act.

Speakers (click to view): Angy Rivera, Bethany Van Kampen, Morgan Hopkins

A Pocketbook Issue: Abortion Access is Economic Justice

Speakers

Angy Rivera

Angy Rivera is a Colombian immigrant and the proud daughter of a single teen mom. She serves as the New York Field Coordinator at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health.

Groups audience: 

Bethany Van Kampen

Bethany Van Kampen serves as the Policy Analyst at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health where she is responsible for the abortion access and affordability portfolio. Prior to joining NLIRH, Bethany worked as a legislative fellow in the office of Senator Barbara Boxer (CA). She received her law degree and Master of Social Work from Tulane University where she co-founded and served as president of the Tulane Law Students for Reproductive Justice and was a member of the Tulane Domestic Violence Law Clinic. Prior to graduate school, Bethany served in the Peace Corps in Costa Rica.

Groups audience: 

Morgan Hopkins

Morgan Hopkins creates synthesis between the state, federal, and field work of the All* Above All public education campaign. Previously, she worked at the National Network of Abortion Funds. Morgan has a B.A. with Honors in Psychology from Hobart and William Smith Colleges and a Masters in Psychology with a certificate in Women's Studies from the University of Houston-Clear Lake.

Groups audience: 

Age Does Not Define a Good Parent: Shifting the Narrative Around Youth Sexuality
The dominant framework around youth sexuality fails to recognize the complex socioeconomic realities Latinx youth experience. Join California Latinas for Reproductive Justice (CLRJ) as we discuss how our long-term initiative, Justice for Young Families (J4YF), is shifting the narrative around pregnant and parenting youth through social media campaigns and storytelling. By creating their own memes, videos, blogs, and even testifying in Sacramento for legislative hearings, our Young Parent Leaders are unapologetically carving their own space and are at the forefront of policy changes that directly impact the health and well-being of young parents across California. Ensuring that all pregnant and parenting youth have the ability to parent (or not parent) their children in a safe and supportive environment, free of violence and judgment, and have access to vital resources needed to thrive is a reproductive justice issue.
Speakers (click to view): Rosalinda Guzman, Lorena García Zermeño

Age Does Not Define a Good Parent: Shifting the Narrative Around Youth Sexuality

Speakers

Rosalinda Guzman

Rosalinda Guzman is a fierce Young Parent Leader and advocate. She has been part of CLRJ's long-term culture shift initiative Justice for Young Families (J4YF) since 2016 and is currently part of the Young Parent Leaders Council (YPLC) in the Central Valley, CA. Rosalinda has been her own spokesperson, uplifting her experience as a young parent and advocating for policy changes that will impact her community.

Groups audience: 

Lorena García Zermeño

Lorena García Zermeño is the Program Coordinator for California Latinas for Reproductive Justice and spearheads our Justice for Young Families (J4YF) initiative, where she works closely with CLRJ’s amazing young parent leaders. She graduated in 2014 from UC Santa Cruz and double majored in Anthropology and Feminist Studies with a concentration in Law, Politics and Social Change.

Groups audience: 

Appropriate Whiteness
During this workshop, participants will learn how to have difficult conversations about white privilege and white supremacy with the people they love, including families, club members, and co-workers. We'll discuss how to be a "credit to your race" in becoming an abolitionist against racism in the reproductive rights movement, how to actively listen and ask questions of people of color with respect, and how to avoid denial, racial triggers and marginalization.
Speakers (click to view): Loretta J. Ross

Appropriate Whiteness

Speakers

Loretta J. Ross

Loretta J. Ross is a former National Coordinator of SisterSong, where she worked from 2005-2012. She helped create the theory of "Reproductive Justice" in 1994 and co-authored Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice in 2004.

Groups audience: 

ArtMoves: Love, Sex, Family & Community
What if we regularly spent time making art? What sort of untapped potential might we unlock? What kinds of new images and visions might we create? How might art and activism come together to make those visions a reality? Exploring your work and lives through different artistic mediums, participants will create art and practice visioning how we get the Love, Sex, Family & Community that we all need and deserve. Open to artists, activists, and those who identify as both!
Speakers (click to view): Jennifer Warren (She/Her), Rachel J. Brooks (She/Her)

ArtMoves: Love, Sex, Family & Community

Speakers

Jennifer Warren (She/Her)

Jennifer Warren brings her passion for reproductive justice and her talent for connecting people to CoreAlign in her role as a regional organizer. Based in Memphis, TN, she works to build and strengthen relationships within the southern repro movement. Prior to joining CoreAlign, Jennifer educated young people on their reproductive health, accumulating more than 20 years of experience working with adolescents, and more than 15 years of experience working in the field of HIV/AIDS, STI and pregnancy prevention. When not organizing and convening, she is either spending time with her loving family, singing at church, or cooking delicious meals.

Groups audience: 

Rachel J. Brooks (She/Her)

Rachel J Brooks is a Training Coordinator at CoreAlign, where she works to ensure that all people have the resources, rights, and respect to make decisions regarding their sexual and reproductive health. Rachel also serves as the Steering Committee Chair for Healthy and Free Tennessee, a coalition working to advance sexual healthy and reproductive freedom across the state.

Groups audience: 

Artivism 101: How Arts and Culture Are Integral to Our Fight for Reproductive Freedom
In order to build new futures, we must first imagine them. And it will take creativity to address long-standing problems facing our communities. Now more than ever, the role of artists and cultural workers are essential to our social movements. In this interactive workshop, we will identify and discuss how artists and cultural workers partner with institutions and work on their own to create performances, illustrations, and other works that advance reproductive freedom. Using the technology of improvisation and freestyle, the workshop will culminate with the sacred tradition of the cypher. We will devise mantras, calls and responses, poetry, rap, rhythm, and movement to co-create a collective freedom song that honors our visions for bodily autonomy and reproductive justice.
Speakers (click to view): Taja Lindley

Artivism 101: How Arts and Culture Are Integral to Our Fight for Reproductive Freedom

Speakers

Taja Lindley

Taja Lindley is an artist based in Brooklyn. She is the founder of Colored Girls Hustle, and a member of Echoing Ida and Harriet's Apothecary. // ColoredGirlsHustle.com // TajaLindley.com

Groups audience: 

Birth Is More Than A Moment: Birth Justice In Our Communities
This panel will explore how control over birthing experiences has been a part of the broader fight for reproductive rights and body sovereignty. Speakers will discuss their experiences with birth INjustices and with creating experiences of birth justice. We will address racism's role in health disparities, reclaiming our traditional knowledge, efforts to expand community-based and full-spectrum models of care, mental healthcare and depression, and holding the movement accountable to the full spectrum of birthing experiences (including abortion, loss, and postpartum). We will highlight the need for education, access, and support for marginalized pregnant/birthing/parenting people, including people of color, incarcerated people, and rural folks. People in our communities may have the least access to quality care and birth options, but the greatest need.
Speakers (click to view): Mollie Hartford (She/Her), La Loba Loca (She/They/Loba), Marisa Pizii (She/Her), Monica Simpson (She/Her)

Birth Is More Than A Moment: Birth Justice In Our Communities

Speakers

Mollie Hartford (She/Her)

Mollie Hartford is a Childbirth Educator, a mother, and a Hampshire Alum. When she’s not knitting reproductive anatomy or hats that look like pigeons, she is working to make sure that mothers have the tools in place to care for themselves and their families, and that communities realize their responsibility in raising the next generation.

Groups audience: 

La Loba Loca (She/They/Loba)

La Loba Loca is based in so-called Los Angeles. Loba is a Queer Machona South American Migrant, zine maker, writer, tattooist, crafter, full spectrum companion, aspiring midwife student, seed-saver, and gardener. La Loba Loca is invested in disseminating information with the hope that self-knowledge and (re)cognition of #abuelitaknowledge will create a future where we can depend on ourselves and communities. La Loba Loca’s core philosophy is based on (re)claiming and (re)membering Abuelita Knowledge and learning how to use our roots as a tool for liberation and transformation. IG:@lalobalocashares,lalobaloca.com, facebook.com/lalobaloca, lalobaloca.bigcartel.com

Groups audience: 

Marisa Pizii (She/Her)

Marisa Pizii is the Director of Programs with The Prison Birth Project. In addition to her work for reproductive and birth justice, Marisa has a deep commitment to the vision of a community where human rights and love are part of the core operating principles of people and policies.

Groups audience: 

Monica Simpson (She/Her)

Monica Raye Simpson is the Executive Director of SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. A native of rural North Carolina, Monica is deeply invested in southern movement building and the fight for Black liberation. She is also committed to birth justice as a certified Doula. Monica couples her activism with her artistry and created SisterSong's first program focused on creating innovative culture shift strategies. Because of her “artivism” Monica was named as a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine and chosen as one of Advocate Magazine’s 40 under 40 leaders.

Groups audience: 

Birth Justice 101
This workshop will introduce participants to the Birth Justice framework by examining how pregnancy, birth, and parenting intersect with social, racial, and economic justice. We will also explore the rising maternal and infant mortality rates in this country, with a particular lens toward intersectional analysis. Participants will have the opportunity to get involved with interactive methods and tools to build the Birth Justice movement and strategize about how to utilize a radical approach to organizing, education, and access to birth options, including midwifery care.
Speakers (click to view): Jamarah Amani, Hadassah, Mahoro, Nalubaale and Mosiah

Birth Justice 101

Speakers

Jamarah Amani, Hadassah, Mahoro, Nalubaale and Mosiah

Jamarah Amani is a community midwife and mother of four. Her mission is to do her part to build a movement for birth justice locally, nationally and globally. A community organizer from the age of 16, Jamarah has worked with several organizations across the United States, the Caribbean, and in Africa on various public health issues. She is currently the director of Southern Birth Justice Network, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.

Groups audience: 

Boston Doula Project: A Case Study on Reclaiming Space for BIPOCs
This is a closed session for black, indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) to explore the challenges faced by BIPOCs when working with a white feminist approach to reproductive health organizing. Boston Doula Project will offer a brief overview of its history and share strategies around reclaiming spaces for BIPOC with attention to relational building, affinity spaces and organizing against oppressive dynamics. We are committed to centering and uplifting the voices of black womxn, trans and non-binary people.
Speakers (click to view): Janhavi Madabushi (They/Them), Mary Durden

Boston Doula Project: A Case Study on Reclaiming Space for BIPOCs

Speakers

Janhavi Madabushi (They/Them)

Janhavi Madabushi is a South Indian immigrant, queer and nonbinary person. They are a full-spectrum doula, a racial justice organizer and a yoga teacher trainee who works in the Boston metro area.

Groups audience: 

Mary Durden

Mary Durden is a queer, black woman fighting to uplift survivors of oppression. She volunteers for the Boston Doula Project, an abortion doula collective that provides nonjudgmental support for people experiencing abortion. She is also the Communications and Outreach Manager at Ibis Reproductive Health where she works on the Free the Pill campaign to make a birth control pill available over the counter in the US.

Groups audience: 

Campus Accountability, Consent and Ending Rape Culture

Building campus communities that can effectively intervene, prevent and eventually end the epidemic of sexual violence means taking a multi-pronged approach that pushes the administration to hold perpetrators accountable while shifting and ensuring conversations about consent and rape, and making space for healing to help survivors move forward. From updating student code definitions to cultivating story telling sessions, we can make a difference. Hear from advocates about examples of education, prevention and support programs that are working to create safer space and change the culture on college campuses.

Speakers (click to view): Mahroh Jahangiri, Morgan Meneses-Sheets, Rebecca Gorena, Zoe Ridolfi-Starr

Campus Accountability, Consent and Ending Rape Culture

Speakers

Mahroh Jahangiri

Mahroh Jahangiri is a Deputy Director of Know Your IX, a national survivor-run, student-driven campaign to end sexual violence in schools. Before joining KYIX, Mahroh was a junior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Her research on immigration detention in Washington, DC and work in Cairo, Egypt has focused on the ways in which American militarization, racism, and sexual violence impact non-white communities transnationally.

Groups audience: 

Morgan Meneses-Sheets

Morgan Meneses-Sheets has more than 15 years of experience leading programs for a range of reproductive and social justice organizations. Currently, she is a consultant working with nonprofit advocacy groups to create effective communications and public affairs strategies to raise awareness and cultivate support for social, culture and policy change.

Groups audience: 

Rebecca Gorena

Rebecca Gorena is an unapologetic queer & feminist activist and Texas State Organizer with URGE: Unite for Reproductive & Gender Equity, where she does civic engagement, training and mobilizing young Texans for reproductive justice. A 2012 University of Texas at Austin alum, she served as an Americorps VISTA with the Girls Empowerment Network before moving to Philadelphia to join the development team at WOMEN’S WAY.

Groups audience: 

Zoe Ridolfi-Starr

Zoe Ridolfi-Starr is an activist, writer, and educator focused on sexual violence, health, pleasure, and power. Zoe is the Deputy Director at Know Your IX, a survivor- and youth-driven organization working to end gender violence in schools. She graduated from Columbia University in 2015, where she was a complainant in the Title IX complaint against her school and involved in organizing against violence on campus.

Groups audience: 

Combatting Settler-Terrorism Through Indigenous Liberation
There can be no justice on stolen, indigenous land without indigenous justice. Oli (Osage/Chichimeca/Mvskoke) and Ashley (Oglala Lakota/Absentee Shawnee) will use Oklahoma indigenous grassroots resistance as a foray into a discussion about settler-terrorism, racial justice, indigenous liberation, environmental justice, cross-movement collaboration, and bridge building. With the ever-pressing threat of occupied leaders “Oklahomanizing” the rest of the so-called United States, there is much to learn from those on the frontlines in Oklahoma actively resisting settler-terrorism, climate change, and oppressive policies that contribute to mass incarceration, environmental genocide, and high rates of police killings of indigenous and black people. Participants will walk away with a better understanding of their relationship to the land, the struggles faced by those involved in frontline grassroots indigenous resistance, and how to stop complicity in systems that contribute to and perpetuate the silencing, erasure, and genocide of indigenous peoples.
Speakers (click to view): Ashley Nicole McCray, oli ramirez

Combatting Settler-Terrorism Through Indigenous Liberation

Speakers

Ashley Nicole McCray

Ashley Nicole McCray is a grassroots indigenous organizer from the Oglala Lakota Nation and Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma. Ashley fights on behalf of indigenous liberation, racial justice, and the environment in Oklahoma and across Indian Country.

Groups audience: 

oli ramirez

oli is a native youth from oklahoma who partakes in direct action and direct action training who encourages diverse network building to help each other with tactics and knowledge to help achieve goals.

Groups audience: 

Contraceptive Safety and LARC

Long-acting reversible contraceptives (like IUDs and hormonal implants) and hormonal injections (like Depo-Provera) are disproportionately marketed and prescribed to young women, women of color, and women in the global South. Panelists will provide a brief overview of health disparities affecting women of color and queer and trans youth; contraceptive equity as it relates to sexual and reproductive health; forms of eugenics and population control; sterilization of people who are institutionalized; and barriers to access to a full range of contraceptives.

Speakers (click to view): Anne Hendrixson, Dr. Krystal Redman, Monica Raye Simpson

Contraceptive Safety and LARC

Speakers

Anne Hendrixson

Anne Hendrixson is the Director of the Population and Development Program (PopDev) at Hampshire College.

Groups audience: 

Dr. Krystal Redman

Dr. Krystal Redman brings over 10 years of experience in managing low-income and women focused public health access and community-based youth development programs. Previously, Dr. Redman served as the Senior Project Director, Maternal and Child Health, at the Georgia Department of Public Health, where she worked on creating greater healthcare access for women throughout the state of Georgia. Dr. Redman received her Bachelors of Science in Sociology from University of California, Riverside and a Masters of Health Administration from University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and her Doctorates of Public Health from Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California.

Groups audience: 

Monica Raye Simpson

Monica Raye Simpson is the Executive Director of SisterSong, and has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, and the systematic physical and emotional violence inflicted upon Black people with an emphasis on Black Southerners and LGBTQ people. She is also a singer, full circle Doula and was named a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine & a 40 under 40 leader by the Advocate.

Groups audience: 

Embodied Leadership
This workshop will demonstrate simple steps participants can take to attune to the embodied, relational, and emotional aspects of your nervous system. In doing so, we integrate the intelligence of the body into our activism, organizing, leading, and education work. We deepen our capacity to connect across difference, and we create access to greater cognitive functioning.
Speakers (click to view): Jamila Umi Jackson (She/Her)

Embodied Leadership

Speakers

Jamila Umi Jackson (She/Her)

Jamila Jackson is a dancer and community organizer. Originally from the San Francisco Bay Area and a Hampshire College Alum, her work focuses on youth leadership, embodiment, healing, and community building.

Groups audience: 

Funding the Movement: Strategies for Foundation Fundraising and Rapid Response Resources for Reproductive Justice Activists
Reproductive justice and social justice organizations rely heavily on funding from foundations. Yet if all of U.S. foundation giving were represented by one dollar, only seven cents would go to organizations that work on issues connected to women and girls. Even fewer than seven cents is allocated to organizations that are grassroots, lack 501c3 status, are led by young people, are led by women of color and indigenous women, are led by transgender or non-binary people, and/or are located in rural areas and/or red states. However, these areas and communities are often most impacted by reproductive injustice and oppression. Third Wave Fund is a national funder of youth-led reproductive and gender justice organizing, activism, and healing, with a focus on issues and communities that have traditionally been left out of philanthropy. This workshop will provide an introduction to philanthropy, tips on how to seek foundation funding, and an overview of the research, proposal, and follow-up processes. Participants will have an opportunity to practice skills, ask questions, and get the info they need to build grants resources for their groups, communities, and movements!
Speakers (click to view): Joy Messinger, mai doan

Funding the Movement: Strategies for Foundation Fundraising and Rapid Response Resources for Reproductive Justice Activists

Speakers

Joy Messinger

Joy Messinger is a queer, disabled, femme organizer of spreadsheets, funding, and people to build sustainability, healing, wellness, and power for reproductive justice, queer and trans liberation, and disabled, migrant, and POC communities. As Third Wave Fund's Program Officer, she oversees Third Wave's rapid response, multi-year general support, and capacity building grantmaking and supports its cross-sector philanthropic advocacy.

Groups audience: 

mai doan

mai is queer writer, facilitator, and healing justice lover living in Chicago, IL. she brings over 10 years of experience as a youth worker and advocate focused on gender and reproductive justice to her position as a Program Assistant with the Third Wave Fund.

Groups audience: 

How Do Families Resist?
Building on past conversations at CLPP within COFFEE (Conference on Feminist Families, Equality, and Experiences), we want to create a space to wrestle with the intersections of personal, political, and familial in our new political reality. Beginning November 9th, it’s arguable that all the issues surrounding family feel different (and maybe are different) than before. Join us — we’ll discuss differentiating the urgent and the important, asking how we prioritize, find joy, gather strength and continue to move forward in a time of resistance. We will also tackle practical topics like what does family activism look like and how to talk to our kids about Trump and this moment in American history, including rising rates of bigotry in the country.
Speakers (click to view): Sarah Buttenwieser, Natasha Vianna, Tope Fadiran

How Do Families Resist?

Speakers

Natasha Vianna

Natasha Vianna is a rebelde in tech, a repro justice activist, and co-founder of #NoTeenShame.

Groups audience: 

Tope Fadiran

Tope Fadiran Charlton is a writer and researcher whose work addresses the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in American culture. She is a research fellow with Political Research Associates, a progressive social justice think tank. Her work has been featured by TIME.com, The Guardian, Salon, Bitch Magazine, and other outlets.

Groups audience: 

- Private group -
How We Win: Using Direct Action to Increase Access to Abortion and Advance Reproductive Justice

If we want to stop losing and start winning, we need to make it clear we're unwilling to lose. In this interactive workshop we will lead a direct action training tailored to reproductive justice activists and advocates working at the grassroots level. Using examples and clear definitions, we'll cover what direct action is, why direct action is a necessary part of the movement, and how it's effective in bringing about change. We'll spotlight the work of intersectional social change activists, and lead a training for those interested in leading direct actions in their own communities.

Speakers (click to view): Erin Matson, Pamela Merritt

How We Win: Using Direct Action to Increase Access to Abortion and Advance Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Erin Matson

Erin Matson is co-founder and co-director of Reproaction, a new group forming to increase access to abortion and advance reproductive justice. An organizer and writer, Erin lives in Virginia and has a young daughter.

Groups audience: 

Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

Groups audience: 

How to Fight the Right
Successful campaigns must include both offensive and defensive strategies. By taking into account the who, how, and why of our opposition, we become more capable of anticipating and confronting the myriad ways in which they attempt to thwart our liberation. In this workshop, participants will gain a general understanding of the network of organizations and individuals who represent the greatest threats to reproductive justice, the ideologies that fuel them, and the strategies and mechanisms used to advance their agenda. Woven into this framing will be examples of diverse and creative forms of resistance from frontline organizers in order to spark and inspire our collective imagination. With the support of facilitators, participants will then have the opportunity to examine the key sources of opposition in their local context, consider possible points of intervention, and begin to map out their own Fight the Right strategy.
Speakers (click to view): Cole Parke, Erin Matson, Pamela Merritt

How to Fight the Right

Speakers

Cole Parke

Cole Parke has degrees in theology and conflict transformation, and has been working at the intersections of faith, gender, and sexuality as an activist, organizer, and scholar for more than a decade. Their research and writing examines the infrastructure, mechanisms, strategies, and effects of the Religious Right on LGBTQ people and reproductive rights, both domestically and internationally, always with an eye toward collective liberation.

Groups audience: 

Erin Matson

Erin Matson is co-founder and co-director of Reproaction, a direct action group formed to increase access to abortion and advance reproductive justice. She lives in Arlington, Virginia.

Groups audience: 

Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

Groups audience: 

Imagination as the Antidote to the Impossible: Imaginative Practices for Reproductive Justice

Many of us working on reproductive justice are faced with “impossible” tasks everyday. Moving forward means thinking outside the box and opening our minds to new ideas and practices to get us through tough problems and towards creative solutions. How can “play” be productive? How can imagination open us to new ways of working and living? Join us at our interactive imagination stations to explore these and other questions.

Speakers (click to view): Indra Lusero, Nikki Zaleski, Sandra Criswell, Yong Chan Miller

Imagination as the Antidote to the Impossible: Imaginative Practices for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Indra Lusero

Indra Lusero is a reproductive justice attorney and entrepreneur and proud to have been named “All Around Reproductive Justice Champion” by the Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights. Indra is the founder and director of Elephant Circle and the Birth Rights Bar Association.

Groups audience: 

Nikki Zaleski

Nikki Zaleski is the Education and Arts Justice Director at the Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health, where she manages a participatory performance cadre called For Youth Inquiry (FYI) as well as other ICAH educational programs.

Groups audience: 

Sandra Criswell

Sandra Criswell is a mixed race Pinay high holy femme from Oklahoma City, OK. As the CoreAlign Field Building Manager, she works with brilliant organizers to co-create generative spaces and innovative solutions in the Central and South. Sandra plays with graphic recording, space creation, and cooking her thoughts and feelings and serving them up to her friends and family to unlock imagination’s potential to solve the impossible.

Groups audience: 

Yong Chan Miller

Yong Chan Miller lives in Oakland, CA, and is the executive director of Surge. She has worked in social justice movements for over 20 years primarily at the intersections of race, class, and gender.

Groups audience: 

Is There Such a Thing as Bad Abortions? When Storytelling Gets Real

Storytelling has and is being used as a tool for social impact and culture shift, specifically regarding the power of story sharing when it comes to personal perceptions of abortion. But what are some of the difficulties in using storytelling as a movement building tool? In bringing to light a wide experience of abortion stories, are there tough questions to address regarding morality, objectivity, and the multiple stigmas at play? Let’s have a real and honest conversation about what people perceive as “good abortions” and “bad abortions,” and use our collective knowledge and experiences to more effectively use storytelling as a game-changing tool.

Speakers (click to view): Julia Reticker-Flynn, Shomya Tripathy

Is There Such a Thing as Bad Abortions? When Storytelling Gets Real

Speakers

Julia Reticker-Flynn

Julia Reticker-Flynn is the Director of Youth Organizing and Mobilization at Advocates for Youth, where she works with young people across the country to advocate for cultural and policy change that supports young people’s sexual health and rights. In 2011, she launched the 1 in 3 campaign to destigmatize abortion and promote access to abortion services. She currently serves on the Board of Directors of Nursing Students for Choice.

Groups audience: 

Shomya Tripathy

Shomya Tripathy is the Youth Activist Network Manager at Advocates for Youth and works with young people around the country to fight abortion stigma on their campuses.

Groups audience: 

Money for Our Movements
How will your reproductive justice work get the funding it needs? This session is geared towards anyone who has a project or organization they want to raise funds for, as well as people who want to learn more about the field of philanthropy and the value of being an activist donor. We will provide an overview of the foundation landscape for reproductive justice work and will provide practical advice for approaching foundation staff as well as the ins and outs of the grant proposal process. In addition to fundraising from foundations, we will dive into fundraising from individuals, a prospect where there is far more light at the end of the tunnel! We’ll discuss major donor fundraising as well as grassroots fundraising campaigns.
Speakers (click to view): Alicia Jay, Joy Messinger, Rye Young

Money for Our Movements

Speakers

Alicia Jay

Alicia Jay is a Co-Founder and the Managing Director of Make It Work, a campaign to bring about change on the economic security issues that impact women and working families. She is also the Principal of Rabble Up Coaching for emerging social change leaders, and brings a background in gender justice, philanthropy, and leadership development to all of her work. She proudly sits on the Advisory Board of the Third Wave Fund.

Groups audience: 

Joy Messinger

Joy Messinger is a passionate community advocate whose life and career is guided by a commitment to social and reproductive justice. Currently calling Chicago home, she has also lived and worked in Central North Carolina and Western New York. Joy is Third Wave Fund's Program Officer and also devotes time to local and national feminist, adoptee justice, Asian American, and LGBTQ community building.

Groups audience: 

Rye Young

Rye Young is the Executive Director of Third Wave Fund (www.thirdwavefund.org) which supports and strengthens youth-led gender justice activism focusing on efforts that advance the political power, well-being, and self-determination of communities of color and low-income communities. He serves on the Board of Directors of the New York Abortion Access Fund and Funders for LGBTQ Issues, and serves on the advisory board of A is For. Rye is passionate about expanding opportunities for communities who are most affected by oppression yet remain marginalized in our movements and in philanthropy. He is an avid cook, and ferocious lover of bingo.

Groups audience: 

Mother Who Works the Land - Decolonizing Reproductive Justice and Building Collective Voice on Land, Body and Place
This interactive workshop is intended to provide a forum where reproductive justice is explored through the lens of Indigenous and land based peoples. Through the facilitation of Trauma Rocks, a multigenerational story of trauma and resiliency, we will provide a space that is both experiential and visual for participants to understand the fundamental connections of land and bodies. By exploring environmental and reproductive justice, participants will build collective understanding, and voice the implications of place, land and body within their work. Throughout the discussion, participants will be led through breath and movements as a way to encourage healthy embodiment, self-care and exploration of story.
Speakers (click to view): Jessica Riggs (She/Her), Nathana Bird (She/Her), Steph McCreary (She/Her)

Mother Who Works the Land - Decolonizing Reproductive Justice and Building Collective Voice on Land, Body and Place

Speakers

Jessica Riggs (She/Her)

Jessica Riggs is a passionate advocate for reproductive and birth justice and has made it her mission to provide compassionate and culturally appropriate doula care to the families in her community. She is committed to working in the intersections of indigenous women’s health, reproductive justice, environmental justice, and ending violence against girls, women, and Mother Earth. She lives in rural Northern New Mexico, where she is a co-parenting mother of a beloved son.

Groups audience: 

Nathana Bird (She/Her)

Nathana Bird, M.A., is a mother from Ohkay Owingeh and Kewa pueblos in NM and the Women’s Leadership & Economic Freedom Program Manager at Tewa Women United. In the last 3 years with TWU, Ms. Bird has worked primarily with our A'Gin Healthy Sexuality and Body Sovereignty Project in local public and tribal schools.

Groups audience: 

Steph McCreary (She/Her)

Steph McCreary works as the Doula Project Coordinator for Tewa Women United in rural northern New Mexico. As an instructor of Kundalini Yoga, she is interested in how embodiment, meditation, and healing practices can be woven into our work within the social & reproductive justice movements.

Groups audience: 

Not Just Women: Changing Our Language for a Trans Inclusive Movement
This interactive workshop is for cisgender (non-transgender) folks who wish to invest in a more trans inclusive reproductive justice movement. Let's learn together by engaging in dialogue after gaining the basic tips and tools on language and the experiences of trans bodies in the movement. This space is intended to be a learning space to get your questions answered and challenge each other to hold our communities accountable for bringing the valuable voices of trans folks to the forefront.
Speakers (click to view): NikoTiare

Not Just Women: Changing Our Language for a Trans Inclusive Movement

Speakers

NikoTiare

NikoTiare is a shapeshifting queer of color currently based in Pomona, CA. Niko's work currently centers on facilitating support groups for trans students. At the core of their work, Niko aims to make theoretical models of identity development accessible through empowering individuals to share knowledge and experiences with each other. Niko believes a healthy, sustainable community begins with attempting to understand ourselves and each other.

Groups audience: 

Now What? Strategy Session on Building a Trans Reproductive Justice Agenda
In 2016's panel we laid the foundation for a healing space to talk about the ways in which Black women, cis and trans, are pitted against each other for space around reproductive justice issues. Now we want to take that momentum and talk about how to advance this conversation that shares strategies and serve as a space to think outside the box around how we build relationships and move work.
Speakers (click to view): Lucia Leandro Gimeno (They/Them or He/Him), Lill M. Hewko (They/Them or She/Her), Marianne Bullock (She/Her), Quita Tinsley (She/Her or They/Them), Stacy Torres (She/Her)

Now What? Strategy Session on Building a Trans Reproductive Justice Agenda

Speakers

Lucia Leandro Gimeno (They/Them or He/Him)

Lucia Leandro Gimeno is an Afro-­Latinx, trans masculine femme counselor/bruja/organizer. Lucia Leandro lived in New York City for 15 years organizing with queer and trans communities of color. He is the Director of the Queer & Trans People Of Color Birthwerq Project, an organization dedicated to mending the disconnect between trans justice and reproductive justice. An expert chilaquiles maker, fashion queen and movement builder, some people say you can even hear his laugh from a mile away.

Groups audience: 

Lill M. Hewko (They/Them or She/Her)

Lill Hewko, an attorney and activist, uses the reproductive justice framework to bring incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals together to advocate for systemic change. A graduate of the University of Washington School of Law. Lill identifies as a queer, mixed-Latinx from a working-class background.

Groups audience: 

Marianne Bullock (She/Her)

Marianne Bullock is currently the Manager at Community Action's Family Center in Franklin Co. She is also a trainer with the Franklin Co. Community Birthworkers. She is a founder of The Prison Birth Project and served as lead doula with them for a decade. She was a lead organizer on Antishackling legislation & Paid Sick Days in Mass.

Groups audience: 

Quita Tinsley (She/Her or They/Them)

Quita Tinsley is a fat, Black, queer femme that writes, organizes, and builds toward liberatory change in her home, the South. She is a columnist for Feministing, a board member of Access Reproductive Care – Southeast, and a member of Echoing Ida, a Black women and nonbinary folks’ writing collective of Forward Together.

Groups audience: 

Stacy Torres (She/Her)

Stacy Torres Is a politicized healer who is working to provide culturally-relevant care that is responsive to her communities’ needs.She strives to uplift people of color by fostering a (re)connection to past, present, and future generations through our healing legacies and community connections. ​

Groups audience: 

Organizing for Sexual and Reproductive Justice in NYC: Engaging Community to Transform Public Institutions
A reproductive justice revolution is happening in New York City: a municipal agency (the nation’s largest health department) is working to adopt the principles of reproductive justice, guided by the Sexual and Reproductive Justice Community Engagement Group (CEG) comprised of over 50 nonprofit organizations, community leaders, activists, and academics. The purpose of this workshop is to 1) provide an overview of the CEG and its approach to incorporate a sexual and reproductive justice framework into the work of the NYC Health Department, 2) reflect on the CEG process and share successes, challenges, and lessons learned to date, and 3) facilitate a discussion around opportunities for communities to engage government institutions in order to forge partnerships that drive institutional transformation processes aligned with sexual and reproductive Justice. This workshop is offered in the spirit of open sharing and honest self-reflection, in hopes that others will be inspired to carry seeds of this idea across the nation.
Speakers (click to view): Nicole JeanBaptiste, Kaleb Oliver Dornheim, Allyna Steinberg, Lynn Roberts, PhD, Farah Diaz-Tello

Organizing for Sexual and Reproductive Justice in NYC: Engaging Community to Transform Public Institutions

Speakers

Nicole JeanBaptiste

Nicole JeanBaptiste is the creator and lead doula of NYC-based Sésé Doula Services. Currently a Birth Justice Project Coordinator consultant with the NYC Department of Health’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Unit, Nicole works directly with community members from across NYC to advocate for birth justice. Nicole also teaches a community-based yoga class once a week in the South Bronx.

Groups audience: 

Kaleb Oliver Dornheim

Kaleb Dornheim is 25, poor, trans/nonbinary, queer, mentally ill, Baltimore and Hudson Valley grounded, has their Masters in Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies concentrating in Trans Studies Education, and works at GMHC as a Sexual and Reproductive Advocate for TGNC folks. When they aren't working or doing activism, they like being around farm animals, plants, and engaging in Kardashian Discourse.

Groups audience: 

Allyna Steinberg

Allyna Steinberg became active in promoting sexual health after losing her uncle to AIDS in the early 1990s. Currently at the NYC Health Department, she co-leads health campaigns with reproductive justice advocates and diverse centered communities, organizes internally for Race to Justice, and teaches mindfulness and movement as a certified Alexander Technique teacher (addressing the role the body plays in healing from stress and trauma).

Groups audience: 

Lynn Roberts, PhD

Lynn Roberts is an assistant professor in the Department of Community Health and Social Sciences at the CUNY School of Public Health. Prior to joining CUNY, she oversaw the development, implementation, and evaluation of several prevention programs for women and youth in NYC. Dr. Roberts’ current activism and scholarship examines the intersections of race, class, and gender in adolescent dating relationships, juvenile justice, and reproductive health policies, as well as the impact of models of collaborative inquiry and teaching on civic and political engagement. She is co-editor and contributing author of the anthology Radical Reproductive Justice: Foundation, Theory, Practice, Critique (Feminist Press, 2017).

Groups audience: 

Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah is a human rights attorney dedicated to the pursuit of reproductive justice, with a focus on dignity, self-determination, and freedom from violence and coercion in pregnancy and the full spectrum of pregnancy outcomes. She is Senior Counsel for the SIA Legal Team, and serves on the Board of All-Options.

Groups audience: 

Our Communities Are Not Dumping Grounds: Environmental and Reproductive Justice
What role does pollution play in our reproductive lives? How have companies profited from exposing Black women to harmful toxins and hidden chemicals linked to cancer, infertility, birth defects, and other serious health problems through “feminine care” products? How does climate change exacerbate "natural" disasters, and why are people of color at the greatest risk of having their lives disrupted? This workshop will examine urgent environmental issues with a close look at the economic and racial inequities that disproportionately impact communities of color and fenceline communities. From building resiliency and political power in fenceline communities to fighting back against toxic assault and reclaiming our right to safe products, it’s time for reproductive justice advocates to invest deeply in environmental justice!
Speakers (click to view): Nourbese Flint, Sarada Tangirala, Elisabeth Lamar

Our Communities Are Not Dumping Grounds: Environmental and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Nourbese Flint

Nourbese Flint is a blerd with a background in reproductive justice, journalism, all things X-Men and Batman related, matte lipsticks, Bob's Burgers, and Star Trek. She is currently working at Black Women for Wellness and Black Women for Wellness Project where she directs policy, RJ programs, civic engagement, graphic design, and keeping markers and crayons organized.

Groups audience: 

Sarada Tangirala

Sarada Tangirala leads corporate campaigns aimed at eliminating toxic chemicals from products that impact women's health and our communities. Before that, she led market-based change efforts at the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics and conducted strategic corporate research for environmental justice campaigns at the DataCenter. She holds a master's in public policy from Oregon State University and a BA in sociology from UC Davis.

Groups audience: 

Elisabeth Lamar

Elisabeth Lamar has advocated for safe and legal abortion since the age of 14. Her very first job was as a peer educator for Planned Parenthood where she helped organize a teen conference. Elisabeth holds a degree in Womxn's Studies and has served as a Sierra Club volunteer for the past five years.

Groups audience: 

Qs About the T: Talking About Trans* Lives and Experiences
New allies encouraged to attend! This workshop is a 101-level crash course in navigating discussions about the trans* and gender-variant community. Structured as half-lecture, half-Q&A, participants will first build foundational knowledge around privilege and oppression, trans* terminology, and issues affecting the community. The presenter will then open themself up to answer all your burning questions about their own experiences, and what their life is like as a trans*-identified person. All are welcome!
Speakers (click to view): Kai Devlin

Qs About the T: Talking About Trans* Lives and Experiences

Speakers

Kai Devlin

Kai is a queer educator, activist, and youth advocate working toward improving the lives of youth and young people. A Smith College alum, Kai is an M.Ed. candidate at Springfield College in the School Counseling program. He currently serves as a Middle School Advisor for the GEAR UP grant in Springfield Public Schools, a speaker with SpeakOUT Boston, and a freelance LGBTQ consultant and trainer in Massachusetts and beyond.

Groups audience: 

Red State Resistance: Missed Connections
Abortion is a centerpiece of reproductive access organizing, especially in conservative areas where it is heavily restricted. Though abortion is essential to overall access to reproductive autonomy, the challenges faced by trans people of color in red states are often ignored or not at all addressed by the abortion access movement. In this session, we ask participants to interrogate the impacts of this focus on abortion and identify what unaddressed gaps are part of true access to reproduction. attendees are encouraged share about needed or existing work in their conservative regions, particularly work that uplifts and/or addresses the needs of Black & Indigenous people & people of color who are trans women, sex workers, disabled people, undocumented people, incarcerated people, and all others on the margins of access. Through discussion, reflection, and networking activities, we will explore how we can use our various connections to address & expand access to reproductive autonomy beyond abortion.
Speakers (click to view): Morgan Collado (She/Her), Noreen Khimji (They/Them)

Red State Resistance: Missed Connections

Speakers

Morgan Collado (She/Her)

Morgan Collado is a working class femme trans latina. She is co-director of Cicada Collective and assistant director of North Texas Abortion Support Network. She is also a facilitator, organizer, performance artist, and published poet of the book Make Love to Rage. Her work centers around leaving a legacy behind for girls like her who are often erased from history and movement spaces.

Groups audience: 

Noreen Khimji (They/Them)

Noreen Khimji is a desi/South Asian femme trans disabled artist, writer, doula, and community organizer. They are co-founder and co-director of Cicada Collective, as well as sole founder and director of the North Texas Abortion Support Network (NTX ASN), a practical support network that provides transportation and more to individuals seeking abortion in DFW.

Groups audience: 

Reproductive Justice & State Legislative Abortion Trends: A Discussion on Innovative Intersectional Strategies
Access to abortion care is a reproductive justice issue. Communities of color, immigrant communities, women, girls, and trans and gender non-conforming folks are all affected by appalling and ever-evolving anti-abortion laws in states across the country. These laws, written mostly by cis white men, are meant to target the most marginalized communities. Learning from the reproductive justice framework, presenters will provide an overview of legislative trends, put abortion restrictions in a demographic context, and discuss proactive strategies to connect with attendees about their experiences at the local and state levels by utilizing storytelling and small group work. Attendees will explore intersections between abortion rights, racial justice, economic justice, gender justice, and immigrant rights to gain a comprehensive understanding of abortion issues in the country today. Presenters will highlight how recent developments in abortion legislation impact marginalized communities' ability to access abortion care and other necessary reproductive health services.
Speakers (click to view): Bethany Van Kampen, Lizamarie Mohammed, Nimra J. Chowdhry

Reproductive Justice & State Legislative Abortion Trends: A Discussion on Innovative Intersectional Strategies

Speakers

Bethany Van Kampen

Bethany Van Kampen serves as the Policy Analyst at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, where she is responsible for the abortion access and affordability portfolio. Bethany leads the federal policy work and supports the needs of the Latina Advocacy Networks (LANs) on issues related to abortion access and affordability. Prior to joining NLIRH as Policy Analyst, Bethany was a Women’s Policy Inc. legislative fellow in the office of Senator Barbara Boxer. Bethany received her law degree and Master of Social Work from Tulane University where she co-founded and served as President of the Tulane Law Students for Reproductive Justice and was a member of the Law & Sexuality Journal and the Tulane Domestic Violence Law Clinic. While in graduate school, Bethany also served as a board member of the New Orleans Abortion Fund, as well as a founding member of the Louisiana Coalition for Reproductive Freedom and the Louisiana Judicial Bypass Project. She received her BA in Psychology from Tufts University.

Groups audience: 

Lizamarie Mohammed

Lizamarie Mohammed is the State Issues Manager at the Guttmacher Institute. She is responsible for analyzing legislative, regulatory, and judicial actions on reproductive health issues, tracking state policy developments, and monitoring state trends across the country. Before joining the Institute, Lizamarie worked on state policy issues for Catholics for Choice. She graduated from Skidmore College and earned her JD from Seattle University School of Law.

Groups audience: 

Nimra J. Chowdhry

Nimra J. Chowdhry is the State Legislative Fellow at the Center for Reproductive Rights. Prior to her work at the Center, Nimra was a Policy Analyst and Senior If/When/How Fellow with Advocates for Youth where her work focused on reproductive justice for Muslim and immigrant youth. Nimra also worked as an If/When/How Fellow at NAPAWF where she advanced policies for the Asian American community. A proud Pakistani-Texan, Nimra holds a JD and a master’s certificate in Women and Gender Studies (WGS) from the University of Houston and a BA in Government and WGS from the University of Texas at Austin.

Groups audience: 

Reproductive Justice 101
Heard the term reproductive justice thrown around a lot? Not really sure what it means or where it comes from? As a framework that many social justice organizations and activists base their work on, it’s important for us to understand what it is we are talking about. Join us to have some of those questions answered and engage in a dialogue on the history, meaning, and application of reproductive justice in our work toward achieving reproductive freedom. Hear from facilitators working on reproductive justice in a number of capacities and figure out what it means for you!
Speakers (click to view): Claire Herrmann, Louisa Bernarbane

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers

Claire Herrmann

Claire Herrmann is a third year student at Hampshire College studying reproductive health with a focus on public policy and access. She has been working with the CLPP student group to help run the childcare program during the conference since her first year at Hampshire.

Groups audience: 

Louisa Bernarbane

Louisa Benarbane is a first year student at Hampshire College studying international politics and law with a focus on the Middle East and North Africa. She currently co-leads for Students for Justice in Palestine and is a CLPP student group member. She looks forward to working and meeting with all of our wonderful conference attendees as we navigate the intersections of systemic, social and of course, reproductive justice.

Groups audience: 

Reproductive Justice 101
Reproductive justice was coined in 1994 by Women of African Descent for Reproductive Justice, a group of Black women who recognized that the white-led women's rights movement was not prioritizing issues critical to women of color, and that we must represent our own communities. This workshop will discuss some of the history of RJ as well as give participants a chance to express their RJ stories. The workshop also involves understanding what's at stake for folk who are often left out of reproductive justice considerations, such as trans women and trans non-binary folks.
Speakers (click to view): Ash Williams, Monica Simpson

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers

Ash Williams

Ash Williams is a trans non-binary femme from Fayetteville, NC. As a Black Lives Matter organizer, Ash has educated the NC community about state-sanctioned violence as it relates to trans and queer people of color. Since 2013, this work has included leading rapid response actions, building solidarity and coalitions across differences, developing press strategies, designing campaigns, educating and mobilizing people on social media, and training other organizers. Ash is a 2016 Human Rights Advocacy Fellow in Residence and Ignite NC Fellow (working against voter suppression), and won the Cyrus M. Johnson Award for Peace and Social Justice in 2014 and the Charlotte Pride Young Catalyst Award in 2016. They hold a master's in Ethics and Applied Philosophy and a bachelor's in Philosophy from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Ash is also a dancer, choreographer, and dance teacher.

Groups audience: 

Monica Simpson

Monica is the Executive Director of SisterSong: Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. Monica has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, racism and intolerance and is deeply invested in southern movement building. Because of her “artivism” Monica was named as a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine and chosen as one of Advocate Magazine’s 40 under 40 leaders.

Groups audience: 

Resist the Right: Cultivate Radical, Inclusive, Intersectional Power
We are resisting, and we have been resisting. While we have worked to actualize a vision of collective liberation, where struggles for LGBTQ rights, racial justice, indigenous sovereignty, disability justice, prison abolition, immigrant rights, and abortion access are understood to be fundamentally linked, the Right has attempted to—sometimes successfully—drive wedges into the borders of our communities, fragmenting our movements and our beings. But when the Right tried to divide us with “All Lives Matter," we responded with more diverse voices asserting that “Black Lives Matter." Panelists will describe how their queer, black, immigrant, digital, and indigenous communities are building intersectional power that cannot be divided.
Speakers (click to view): Shelby Chestnut (They/Them or She/Her), Cole Parke (They/Them), Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa (She/Her/They/Them)

Resist the Right: Cultivate Radical, Inclusive, Intersectional Power

Speakers

Shelby Chestnut (They/Them or She/Her)

Shelby Chestnut is the Director of Community Organizing and Public Advocacy at the New York City Anti-Violence Project. For over a decade, Shelby has been organizing with LGBTQ people, people of color, and low income communities to address violence, promote access to resources, and affect local policy change that is for and by the people most impacted by oppression. Shelby holds a BA from Antioch College and an MS from the New School. Shelby is a member of the Assinibouine Nation in Montana. Shelby currently calls Brooklyn, New York home.

Groups audience: 

Cole Parke (They/Them)

Cole Parke is the LGBTQ & Gender Justice Researcher at Political Research Associates, a social justice think tank based in Boston. PRA is dedicated to supporting organizers and activists on the Left with info and analysis about right-wing opposition to our collective struggle(s) for liberation.

Groups audience: 

Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa (She/Her/They/Them)

Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa is a 25-year-old Kenyan organizer and poet in New Orleans, LA. She is an Anti-Racist and Reproductive Justice organizer who has spent most of her life living and writing at the intersection of arts, education and activism. In New Orleans, she organizes & advocates with BYP100-NOLA and Women With A Vision, does youth work & poetry with the New Orleans Youth Open Mic and Team Slam New Orleans (Team SNO) and is an African Culture/Fashion Blogger with Noirlinians. View her work at www.FreeQuencySpeaks.com & www.Noirlinians.com.

Groups audience: 

State Violence and the Criminalization of Our Bodies and Communities
What is state violence, and what are its impacts on our communities? How do institutions and policies deliberately target and criminalize communities of color? How can—and do—movements work to combat the realities of state-sanctioned violence and racism? Join this panel of activists mobilizing against state violence and criminalization at the intersections of policing and police violence, mass incarceration, immigration and detention, and trans/queer liberation to learn more about the movements challenging these threats to our communities.
Speakers (click to view): Sasha Alexander (He/She/They), Thanu Yakupitiyage (She/Her), Juana Peralta (She/Her or They/Them), Miski Noor (They/Them)

State Violence and the Criminalization of Our Bodies and Communities

Speakers

Sasha Alexander (He/She/They)

Sasha Alexander. is a trans black/south asian, artist, educator, and healer whose worked at the intersections of lgbtq, youth, media, economic, gender and racial justice movements for almost 20 years. Sasha is the founder of Black Trans Media and works as the Membership Director at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project (SRLP). Sasha uses the pronouns he/she/they and insists you mix it up.

Groups audience: 

Thanu Yakupitiyage (She/Her)

Thanu Yakupitiyage is a long-time immigrant rights activist, media professional, and cultural organizer based in New York City. She worked for the New York Immigration Coalition for close to seven years where she headed the organization's communications and media relations strategy. Through her work at NYIC, she became an immigration policy expert, using her skills in media and communications to shift narratives on immigration and immigrants themselves. She was a lead organizer in recent efforts to push back against Trump's executive orders in his first week in office that mandated a Muslim Ban and increased enforcement and raids against immigrant communities. Most recently, she has taken on the role of managing U.S Communications for 350.org and bringing a migration perspective to the critical work of climate justice. Thanu has an MA in communications from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and a BA in critical media studies and international development from Hampshire College.

Groups audience: 

Juana Peralta (She/Her or They/Them)

Juana Peralta is a queer, fat hard femme Latinx who has been educating and organizing around issues of gender, sexuality, race, class, and disability for 10 years. In 2012, Juana was named one of Chicago’s “30 Under 30” by the Windy City Times. Currently, Juana resides in NYC, and serves as the Director of Outreach and Community Engagement at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. At SRLP, she co-directs the Movement Building Team, and works to strengthen the leadership of transgender, gender non-conforming, and intersex (TGNCI) people; leads cultural/community organizing; and fights for trans liberation, specifically prioritizing the leadership of formerly-/incarcerated, low-/no-income, immigrants, people with different abilities, and TGNCI people of color. Juana has a deep commitment to abolition and organizing around the intersections of prison justice and reproductive justice, and works alongside SRLP’s Prisoner Advisory Committee, using public education to organize around the harms of the prison industrial complex and prisons as centers of reproductive oppression.

Groups audience: 

Miski Noor (They/Them)

Miski Noor is an organizer and writer based in Minneapolis, MN where they work as a Communications Strategist for the Black Lives Matter Global Network and a leader with the local Black Lives Matter--Minneapolis chapter. They are a graduate of the University of Minnesota where they studied Political Science and African and African-American Studies. As a Black, African, immigrant queer person, Miski is committed to working to create a world in which Black life is protected and our collective liberation is realized.

Groups audience: 

Survival and Resilience in the Child Welfare, Juvenile and Criminal Justice Systems
State interference disproportionately affects the integrity of families in the most vulnerable circumstances, including those facing deep poverty, disability, mental health issues, drug addiction, and incarceration. Advocates from Community Legal Services in Philadelphia, the Incarcerated Parents Project, and Justice Now will discuss how these laws and policies, combined with the lack of concrete, systemic supports, destabilize low income families and communities, and their work to share information, resources and strategies to create wellness and build community power.
Speakers (click to view): Lill Hewko, Mianta McKnight, Maggie Potter, Sarah Coburn, Adina Giannelli

Survival and Resilience in the Child Welfare, Juvenile and Criminal Justice Systems

Speakers

Lill Hewko

Lillian Hewko is an attorney at the Incarcerated Parents Project in Seattle, WA. They use the reproductive justice framework to bring incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals together to advocate for systemic change. A graduate of the University of Washington School of Law, Lillian identifies as a queer mixed-Latinx from a working-class background. Lillian is a board member of Surge, a reproductive justice collaborative.

Groups audience: 

Mianta McKnight

Mianta McKnight is a formerly incarcerated juvenile offender tried as an adult who is passionate about incarcerated women. She knows firsthand what the prion experience is like since she served 18 years & 1 day on a 15 year to life sentence and essentially grew up within the prison industrial complex. As a fellow for Justice Now and activist for social change, she is dedicated to challenging inhumane conditions and being a voice for those who are unable to speak for themselves. She attends SFSU and is majoring in dance, which she plans to use to work along with holistic medicine to promote longevity, self-awareness, and self-care.

Groups audience: 

Maggie Potter

Maggie is a Social Worker in the Family Advocacy Unit at Community Legal Services in Philadelphia. She advocates for parents to safely maintain or regain custody of their children. She received a joint Master in Social Work (MSW) and Master of Science in Social Policy (MSSP) degree from the University of Pennsylvania. She lives in Philly with her husband and their two year old daughter.

Groups audience: 

Sarah Coburn

Sarah Coburn works in the Family Advocacy Unit at Community Legal Services of Philadelphia where she serves indigent parents in the child welfare system, helping them maintain or regain custody of their children. Prior to joining CLS as a Staff Attorney, Sarah worked as a public defender in Philadelphia and was previously employed by the ACLU of PA’s Reproductive Rights Project. She is a CLPP and NLNI alum.

Groups audience: 

Adina Giannelli

Trained as a lawyer, Adina Giannelli is a writer, teacher and activist. She lives, works, and agitates in western Massachusetts with her four year old child, where she is at work on her first book, a family memoir titled Ghosts That Haunt Us.

Groups audience: 

Survivor Justice & #MeToo: Building Power to End Sexual Violence and Lead Change for Survivors
We stand at a collective tipping point. We exist at the intersection of the revolutionary #MeToo movement, transforming accountability, solidarity, healing, and justice for survivors, and the Trump administration’s attacks on vital rights and protections for survivors and marginalized people. Now more than ever, we need a powerful, intersectional, and informed survivor justice movement. In this interactive workshop, the facilitator will lead a direct action organizing training tailored to activists and advocates working against sexual, intimate partner, and gender-based violence at the campus and grassroots community level. We will explore your rights, campus and federal policies, the administration’s actions, the possibilities of #MeToo, and the effectiveness of direct action. Using trauma-informed scenarios, participants will learn key tools to mobilize their own community or organization, create and sustain a successful campaign, hold decision-makers accountable, build power, and win real change for survivors. Together, we can advance the movement for survivors and build the future we want to live in. Open to folks of all a/genders and a/sexualities. Open to survivors and allies at all levels of engagement in this work.
Speakers (click to view): Priya Ghosh

Survivor Justice & #MeToo: Building Power to End Sexual Violence and Lead Change for Survivors

Speakers

Priya Ghosh

Priya Ghosh is a survivor activist, community organizer, and educational trainer with a background in movement building, direct action campaigns, and advocacy for survivors of sexual, intimate partner, and gender-based violence. Priya is the Founding Director of the Survivor Justice Project, a grassroots organization empowering and training people to end violence and lead change for survivors. As the former president of CERC at UMass Amherst, she led a successful 2 year campaign for the institution of a Survivor’s Bill of Rights to expand and protect Title IX rights. Priya is deeply invested in the collective building of a transformative, intersectional movement for survivors. Priya currently works at Safe Passage and lives and organizes in the Pioneer Valley.

Groups audience: 

Survivor Justice & #MeToo: Building Student Power to End Sexual Violence and Lead Change for Survivors
We are at a collective tipping point. We exist at the intersection of the revolutionary #MeToo movement, transforming accountability, solidarity, healing, and justice for survivors, and the Trump administration’s attacks on vital rights and protections for survivors and marginalized people. Now more than ever, we need a powerful, intersectional, and informed survivor justice movement. In this interactive workshop, the facilitator will lead a direct action organizing training tailored to activists and advocates working against sexual, intimate partner, and gender-based violence at the campus and grassroots community level. We will explore your rights, campus and federal policies, the administration’s actions, the possibilities of #MeToo, and the effectiveness of direct action. Using trauma-informed scenarios, participants will learn key tools to mobilize their own community or organization, create and sustain a successful campaign, hold decision-makers accountable, build power, and win real change for survivors. Together, we can advance the movement for survivors and build the future we want to live in. Open to folks of all a/genders and a/sexualities. Open to survivors and allies at all levels of engagement in this work.
Speakers (click to view): Priya Ghosh

Survivor Justice & #MeToo: Building Student Power to End Sexual Violence and Lead Change for Survivors

Speakers

Priya Ghosh

Priya Ghosh is a survivor activist, community organizer, and educational trainer with a background in movement building, direct action campaigns, and advocacy for survivors of sexual, intimate partner, and gender-based violence. Priya is the Founding Director of the Survivor Justice Project, a grassroots organization empowering and training people to end violence and lead change for survivors. As the former president of CERC at UMass Amherst, she led a successful 2 year campaign for the institution of a Survivor’s Bill of Rights to expand and protect Title IX rights. Priya is deeply invested in the collective building of a transformative, intersectional movement for survivors. Priya currently works at Safe Passage and lives and organizes in the Pioneer Valley.

Groups audience: 

The Revolution Starts with Me: Recipes, Remedies, Rituals and Resources for Activist Self Care
Newly revised for 2017, this session brings together new and seasoned activists who are dedicated to making community and societal change, AND who are faced with the too-real task of balancing the demands of families, peers, and communities. We are committed to creating a balance between advocating for others and taking care of ourselves. But how do we prioritize self care when we’re being pulled in multiple directions? And what can we do when self care doesn’t feel like an option? Through collaborative activities, storytelling, and skill-sharing, we will examine the effects of burnout at the individual, community, institutional, systemic, and generational levels. You will develop a personalized “Recipes, Remedies, Rituals, and Resources”, and you’ll receive the 2017 "The Revolution Starts with Me: Recipes, Remedies, Rituals, and Resources”, a self care zine with tools, exercises, and advice from the presenters.
Speakers (click to view): Nicole Clark M.S.W. (She/Her)

The Revolution Starts with Me: Recipes, Remedies, Rituals and Resources for Activist Self Care

Speakers

Nicole Clark M.S.W. (She/Her)

Nicole Clark is a licensed social worker, independent consultant and Reproductive Justice activist who uses the RJ framework with nonprofits, government agencies, and community groups to design, implement, and evaluate programs, services and campaign that raises the voices and lived experiences of women and girls of color. Nicole is based in Brooklyn, New York.

Groups audience: 

We Testify: Our Abortion Stories
Almost a third of people who can become pregnant will have an abortion by age 45, and most people only tell 1 or 2 people in their lives. As people who have abortions, we often experience shame and stigma from our communities, society, and even ourselves. In this closed session for people who have had abortions, we will hold space with one another, learn about abortion stigma and how it impacts our experiences, and share our stories. This workshop is led by We Testify, a program of the National Network of Abortion Funds, which seeks to build the leadership of people who’ve had abortions.
Speakers (click to view): Jack Qu'emi Gutierrez (They/Them), Sharon Lagos (She/Her)

We Testify: Our Abortion Stories

Speakers

Sharon Lagos (She/Her)

Sharon is a latina from Honduras studying pre-nursing as an international student. She is passionate about helping those in need.

Groups audience: 

What's the Deal About Families?

Why is family such a huge issue when it comes to feminism? Join us as we launch into the conference weekend by reigniting conversations begun at last year's pre-conference COFFEE (Conference on Feminism, Families, Equity and Experience). Together we will identify key issues relating to families, parenting, and reproductive justice. This session is open to all who are interested in exploring intersections of families and feminism during the conference weekend.

Speakers (click to view): Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser, Avital Norman Nathman, Natasha Vianna, Tope Fadiran

What's the Deal About Families?

Speakers

Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser

Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser is a Hampshire alum. Former CLPP staff, she organized the first years of this very conference. Now, she's a writer whose emphasis includes family issues.

Groups audience: 

Avital Norman Nathman

Avital Norman Nathman is a freelance writer and editor of The Good Mother Myth. Her work has appeared in the NY Times, CNN, The Daily Dot, Cosmopolitan, The Establishment and more. She is also a co-founder of COFFEE.

Groups audience: 

Natasha Vianna

Natasha Vianna is a rebelde in tech, a repro justice activist, and co-founder of #NoTeenShame.

Groups audience: 

Tope Fadiran

Tope Fadiran is a writer and researcher whose work addresses the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in American culture. She is a research fellow with Political Research Associates, a progressive social justice think tank. Her work has been featured on TIME.com, The Guardian, Salon, Bitch Magazine, and other outlets.

Groups audience: 

When Sex Trafficking Is Sensationalized: Criminalizing Working Together
The goal of our workshop is to provide an understanding of sex work and sex trafficking, how they are different, and how, in many states, this distinction is not made. We will discuss the legal definitions and explore how participants understand sex trafficking. Using Alaska as a case study, we will explore the differences between these federal and state laws. We will share how these definitions disproportionately impact the lives of women of color and their families. We will also explain that some people with these charges must register as sex offenders, which further impacts their lives upon their release. We will brainstorm what common elements are important to make sex work safe without causing sex work to be confused as sex trafficking. Our presentation includes a short documentary that shares the stories of individual "sex traffickers" who discuss their lives and experiences prior to and as a result of these charges and incarceration.
Speakers (click to view): Jill McCracken, Amber Batts

When Sex Trafficking Is Sensationalized: Criminalizing Working Together

Speakers

Jill McCracken

Dr. Jill McCracken is an Associate Professor of Rhetoric at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg and the Co-Founder/Co-Director of Sex Workers Outreach Project (SWOP) Behind Bars, an organization that provides community support for incarcerated sex workers and connects incarcerated sex workers in U.S. prisons and jails to the sex worker rights movement. Her primary areas of research focus on sex work and trafficking in the sex industry, the impact of sexuality education on marginalized communities, and women who are incarcerated.

Groups audience: 

Amber Batts

Sex worker deemed sex trafficker from Alaska, where consensual sex workers organized together for safety and security is sex trafficking according to legislation. In 2014 I was charged for sex trafficking due to operating a progressive coalition business featuring sex workers. I was sentenced to 5.5 years and currently I am on discretionary parole.

Groups audience: 

Saturday Session 1: 1:15PM - 2:45PM

A Media Makers Roundtable on Racial Justice
From articulating the needs of our communities to affirming our multi-faceted lives, to visioning new worlds and just futures, media-makers play an integral role in our movements. Join this distinguished panel of media makers using multi-pronged media strategies, written communications, podcasts, music, performance, and multi-media art to make critical political and cultural interventions that guide our activist movements.
Speakers (click to view): Sasha Alexander (He/She/They), Pamela Merritt (She/Her), Shanelle Matthews (She/Her), Taja Lindley (She/Her), Verónica Bayetti Flores (She/Her)

A Media Makers Roundtable on Racial Justice

Speakers

Sasha Alexander (He/She/They)

Sasha Alexander. is a trans black/south asian, artist, educator, and healer whose worked at the intersections of lgbtq, youth, media, economic, gender and racial justice movements for almost 20 years. Sasha is the founder of Black Trans Media and works as the Membership Director at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project (SRLP). Sasha uses the pronouns he/she/they and insists you mix it up.

Groups audience: 

Pamela Merritt (She/Her)

Pamela Merritt is co-founder and co-director of Reproaction, a new direct action group forming to increase access to abortion and advance reproductive justice. Merritt blogs at AngryBlackBitch.com, and is a founding member of the Trust Black Women Partnership. She has been a featured contributor on National Public Radio (NPR), and her writing has been published in the Chicago Sun-Times, Rewire, Rolling Stone, and The Guardian.

Groups audience: 

Shanelle Matthews (She/Her)

Shanelle Matthews is an award-winning political communications strategist with a decade of experience in journalism as well as legislative, litigation, rapid response, and campaign communications. She serves as the Director of Communications for the Black Lives Matter Global Network, organizing to end state-sanctioned violence against Black people by building power and winning immediate improvements in the lives of Black people.

Groups audience: 

Taja Lindley (She/Her)

Taja Lindley is a healer, artist, and writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She is the Founder and Managing Member of Colored Girls Hustle, and a member of Echoing Ida and Harriet's Apothecary. Her writing has appeared in EBONY, Salon, Rewire and YES! Magazine. www.TajaLindley.com / www.ColoredGirlsHustle.com

Groups audience: 

Verónica Bayetti Flores (She/Her)

Verónica Bayetti Flores is a writer, consultant, and cultural critic. She has led national policy and movement building work at the intersections of immigrants’ rights, health care access, police accountability, and LGBTQ liberation. She is co-host of Latinx music podcast Radio Menea, Managing Partner at the Center for Advancing Innovative Policy, and Co-President of the Board of Directors of the National Network of Abortion Funds.

Groups audience: 

A Seat At The Table: Exploring Disruptive Leadership with a Solange Soundtrack
Love to work to a soundtrack? Interested in strategies that can transform space to be more inclusive? So are we. Solange created the perfect soundtrack for organizational change. We are weary, ready to share our magik, and MAD. Joining the fight for Reproductive Justice can mean that you are surrounded by Q/T/ GNC/POC or it can mean knocking down the barriers of white supremacy in a "feminist" organization, collective, or group. How can we live our values, and make actions that propel the RJ movement forward? These are large questions and we want to think them through with you and provide some strategies, games, and tactics to battle white supremacy and structures that organizations lean on to support it. Also if you just want an excuse to dialogue about " A Seat at the Table," we can do that too! This session is Part I of a two-part workshop series and will be followed by Part II: "No Milk For Your Cookies: A Critical Look At White Allyship In The RJ Movement." Join us for one or both sessions!
Speakers (click to view): Erin Grant, Randi Gregory, Alana Belle, Kris Keen

A Seat At The Table: Exploring Disruptive Leadership with a Solange Soundtrack

Speakers

Randi Gregory

Randi has been organizing on electoral, union, and issue based campaigns for the last 8 years. She is dedicated to bringing grassroots organizing and public policy to marginalized communities, specifically LGBTQIA youth of color. She previously worked for SEIU and NARAL Pro Choice Ohio as well as various state Democratic parties as a field director. Currently Randi serves as the Director of Programs for SPARK Reproductive Justice Now, where she is responsible for their field and policy work.

Alana Belle

Alana has been involved in various social justice movements for a few years; she has influenced change in regards to local politics, racial justice, economic justice, and most recently, reproductive justice. The current Community Organizer for New Voices for Reproductive Justice - Cleveland, Alana welcomes every opportunity to engage people in the RJ movement.

Groups audience: 

Kris Keen

Over the past 7 years Kris has dedicated their time to various nonprofit arts and culture and issue-based campaigns to support working class youth of color in Philadelphia. For the past two years Kris worked as a youth organizer servicing Black and Brown youth who were pushed out of and disinvested in by traditional public schools of Philadelphia. Kris is now using that experience to influence their work as a community organizer dedicated to developing Black women, fems, and girls in partnership with LGBTQIA organizations to achieve health and wellness through centering a reproductive justice framework.

Groups audience: 

Abortion Access: Overcoming Barriers and Removing Obstacles
Efforts to restrict access to safe and legal abortion persist, disproportionately affecting the most marginalized people in our society and worldwide. Join us to hear from a distinguished panel of advocates and providers working at the frontlines in hostile climates to discuss the current landscape of (in)access to abortion care. Panelists will talk about current barriers to accessing care and discuss multi-pronged strategies to reduce stigma, add nuance to the conversation about abortion, and fight back against the criminalization of self-induced abortion.
Speakers (click to view): Farah Diaz-Tello, Yashica Robinson, MD, Bhavik Kumar, MD, MPH, Marlene Gerber Fried

Abortion Access: Overcoming Barriers and Removing Obstacles

Speakers

Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah is a human rights attorney dedicated to the pursuit of reproductive justice, with a focus on dignity, self-determination, and freedom from violence and coercion in pregnancy and the full spectrum of pregnancy outcomes. She is Senior Counsel for the SIA Legal Team, and serves on the Board of All-Options.

Groups audience: 

Yashica Robinson, MD

Dr. Yashica Robinson is the medical director of Alabama Women’s Center for Reproductive Alternatives. She is the primary provider of second trimester abortion care in Alabama, while running a busy solo OBGYN practice. Robinson received her Doctor of Medicine from Morehouse School of Medicine. She completed her internship and residency training in Obstetrics and Gynecology at University of Alabama, Birmingham. She is a comprehensive women’s health specialist.

Groups audience: 

Bhavik Kumar, MD, MPH

Bhavik currently works as an abortion provider in Texas and serves as the medical director for the four Whole Woman's Health clinics in Texas. He completed his residency and fellowship training at Albert Einstein COM in Bronx, NY and returned to his home state afterwards. He is public about his work with an aim to reduce abortion stigma and increase visibility of abortion providers.

Groups audience: 

Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a scholar and long-time advocate for abortion access and reproductive justice. She is Professor of Philosophy at Hampshire College and Faculty Director of CLPP. She serves on the board of the Abortion Rights Fund of Western MA and Our Bodies Ourselves, is a consultant to Women Help Women, and is currently a Global Scholar at the O’Neill Institute at Georgetown Law School.

Groups audience: 

Abortion Access: Threats and Resistance Strategies
Efforts to restrict access to safe and legal abortion persist, disproportionately affecting the most vulnerable people in our society and worldwide. Panelists will talk about current barriers to access and discuss activist strategies to resist the threats, including grassroots, national and international campaigns to overturn restrictions on public funding of abortion; and campaigns that position the right to abortion within the broader reproductive justice and human rights frameworks.
Speakers (click to view): Willie J. Parker, Marlene Gerber Fried, Marlo Barrera, Morgan Hopkins, Yamani Hernandez

Abortion Access: Threats and Resistance Strategies

Speakers

Willie J. Parker

Dr. Willie Parker is an advocate of reproductive, social, racial, and gender justice who seeks to model healthy, inclusive, non-patriarchal masculinity while working for change.

Groups audience: 

Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a long time activist for abortion rights and reproductive justice. She is the professor and faculty director of CLPP, the founding president of the National Network of Abortion Funds (NNAF) and the Abortion Rights Fund of Western MA. Marlene is a co-author with Silliman, Ross and Gutierrez of Undivided Rights. She is a recipient of the 2015 NNAF Vanguard Award, the 2014 Felicia Stewart Advocacy Award (APHA), and the SisterSong Warrior Woman Award.

Groups audience: 

Marlo Barrera

Marlo Barrera is a New Orleans native doing reproductive rights work in her hometown. As Intake Coordinator of the New Orleans Abortion Fund, she organizes volunteers to answer the hotline and works directly with clients to assist them in funding their abortions. She also works with her hands—cooking, zine making, and poetry making.

Groups audience: 

Morgan Hopkins

Morgan Hopkins creates synthesis between the state, federal, and field work of the All* Above All public education campaign. Previously, she worked at the National Network of Abortion Funds. Morgan has a B.A. with Honors in Psychology from Hobart and William Smith Colleges and a Masters in Psychology with a certificate in Women's Studies from the University of Houston-Clear Lake.

Groups audience: 

Yamani Hernandez

Yamani Hernandez is the Executive Director of the National Network of Abortion Funds (NNAF), an organization that builds the capacity and power of grassroots member organizations and leverages their direct access to abortion seekers across the country for cultural and political change. She is a member of the Strong Families leadership team and a writer for Echoing Ida, a program of Forward Together.

Groups audience: 

Artists United for Reproductive Justice: Conjuring Community Through Art and Culture

Artists United for Reproductive Justice cultivates artistic leadership and strategy that connects uncommon, idealistic, or even radical ideas with everyday life in working to connect art and culture, activists, scholars, and community builders to examine the political implications and social significance of their work and the work of other practitioners historically and today. In this interactive arts-based experience, participants will explore models for amplifying arts practices for reproductive justice in local communities, and collectively draft goals for strengthening our programming around arts and cultural work as well as offering activist best practices and skill shares.

Speakers (click to view): Monica Raye Simpson, Stephanie J. Alvarado

Artists United for Reproductive Justice: Conjuring Community Through Art and Culture

Speakers

Monica Raye Simpson

Monica Raye Simpson is the Executive Director of SisterSong, and has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, and the systematic physical and emotional violence inflicted upon Black people with an emphasis on Black Southerners and LGBTQ people. She is also a singer, full circle Doula and was named a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine & a 40 under 40 leader by the Advocate.

Groups audience: 

Stephanie J. Alvarado

Stephanie J. Alvarado is a radical queer Latina feminista poet born and raised in the Bronx, NY by way of Guayaquil, Ecuador. Since becoming politicized in her early adolescence around the power of community organizing, cultural, and artistic activism, she has worked at the intersections of youth organizing, reproductive justice, immigrant rights, racial justice, queer liberation, transnational feminism, and language justice. ¡Pa’lante Siempre Pa’lante!

Groups audience: 

Beyond Know Your Rights: The Spectrum of State Violence on Immigrant Communities
This workshop will raise awareness of the challenges that undocumented and mixed-status families face under the Trump administration beyond "Good/Bad Immigrant" rhetoric. Policies that restrict communities of immigrants' ability to live, work, and love with dignity have physical as well as psychological effects on families; for this reason, the immigrant and reproductive justice movements are one and the same. In addition to reflecting on some of the tactics used to police poor immigrant communities of color, participants will work in small groups to better understand the timeline of racist anti-immigrant policies that are already in place. This conversation will center and affirm the resistance and experiences of individuals from the communities directly affected by this violence, especially those living at the most vulnerable intersections of our society, but we invite individuals who work directly with these communities to equip themselves with this critical knowledge.
Speakers (click to view): Janet Perez Valle, Jenifer Guzman, Kelly Tellez

Beyond Know Your Rights: The Spectrum of State Violence on Immigrant Communities

Speakers

Janet Perez Valle

Janet Perez Valle is the Volunteer Coordinator and Community Organizer for Mixteca Organization located in Brooklyn, New York. As a directly impacted person, her work in immigration and with undocumented communities has inspired her to continue advocating and organizing in both her work and personal life.

Groups audience: 

Jenifer Guzman

Jenifer Guzman is a junior in college majoring in psychology and political science, and planning on pursuing a career as a lawyer. She is a self-proclaimed feminist advocating for immigration and reproductive health rights.

Groups audience: 

Kelly Tellez

Kelly Tellez is a queer femme of Mexican descent from Brooklyn, the child of working class immigrants, and a first generation college graduate. Since graduating, Kelly has been supporting her community as an Sadie Nash ELLA fellow at Mixteca Organization and as an abortion doula with the NY Doula Project.

Groups audience: 

Black Mamas Matter
This workshop will explore racial disparities in maternal health through the lenses of reproductive justice, racial justice, and human rights. Presenters will introduce workshop participants to the issues at stake, and describe key events that led them to: (1) confront the normalization of Black maternal mortality and morbidity; (2) reframe maternal health as a social justice advocacy issue; and (3) build a multi-disciplinary network of leaders and stakeholders committed to change. After sharing the history and strategic decision points that have shaped their maternal health and justice work to date, presenters will invite participants to engage in an interactive brainstorming session around the challenges and opportunities of mobilizing for maternal health in our current political climate.
Speakers (click to view): Kwajelyn Jackson (She/Her), Monica Simpson (She/Her), Patrisse Khan-Cullors, Pilar Herrero (She/Her)

Black Mamas Matter

Speakers

Kwajelyn Jackson (She/Her)

Kwajelyn Jackson serves as the Community Education & Advocacy Director at Feminist Women's Health Center, where she manages volunteer engagement, leadership development, community outreach & education, and legislative advocacy to improve reproductive health, rights and justice in Georgia. Kwajelyn also sits on the board of directors for Backline, Abortion Care Network, Soul Food Cypher, ProGeorgia, and the steering committee for the Black Mamas Matter Alliance.

Groups audience: 

Monica Simpson (She/Her)

Monica Raye Simpson is the Executive Director of SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. A native of rural North Carolina, Monica is deeply invested in southern movement building and the fight for Black liberation. She is also committed to birth justice as a certified Doula. Monica couples her activism with her artistry and created SisterSong's first program focused on creating innovative culture shift strategies. Because of her “artivism” Monica was named as a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine and chosen as one of Advocate Magazine’s 40 under 40 leaders.

Groups audience: 

Patrisse Khan-Cullors

Patrisse Khan-Cullors is an artist, organizer and freedom fighter living and working in Los Angeles. She is one of the co-founders of Black Lives Matter and a Senior Fellow at MomsRising.

Groups audience: 

Pilar Herrero (She/Her)

Pilar Herrero is a human rights lawyer working at the intersections of law and health. At the Center for Reproductive Rights, Pilar has worked collaboratively and creatively with a wide range of stakeholders to address racial inequities in U.S. maternal health. Her approach to law, policy and advocacy is informed by many years of community-building for social, racial, and reproductive justice.

Groups audience: 

Black and Jewish Liberation Practices in the Pro-Choice Movement
There is a rich, imperfect history between Black and Jewish communities in the United States. When it comes to reproductive justice, both Black and Jewish communities have factions within that fight female bodily autonomy and are anti-choice. At the same time, Black and Jewish communities have been faced with horrible systems of oppression by white supremacists that subjected them to forced sterilization and other experimentation against their wills. Both communities have roots in the social justice movement, both out of necessity and desire. Yet we are not immune to our own conflicts: there exists in the Jewish community the ugly specter of racism, and in the Black community, there is anti-Semitism. Many of us are working on these festering problems within our own communities, particularly for those who straddle both worlds. We believe that the Black and Jewish communities are strong enough and principled enough, and have enough shared history and love for one another to overcome these painful hurdles in order to build on our bonds and break through any chains that seek to hold us down. The white cis heteronormative has used us, and used us against one another, and it needs to end. Now. Yesterday. Centuries ago. Black and Jewish communities will, do, and should always strive to work together to combat white supremacy in the anti-choice movement and the feminist movement. This panel is suitable for anyone. It centers around Black and Jewish voices; however, people from all walks of life are welcome and highly encouraged to participate. This is a traditional panel that will have space for audience/presenter interaction.
Speakers (click to view): Aliza (uh-LEE-zuh) Worthington, Avital Norman Nathman, Jasmine Banks, Elisha Nain

Black and Jewish Liberation Practices in the Pro-Choice Movement

Speakers

Aliza (uh-LEE-zuh) Worthington

Aliza Worthington is a writer, editor, and activist. She tries not to be problematic white lady, does clinic defense, and moderates discussions in large groups on Facebook. She is a four-time BlogHer Voices of the Year award recipient (2013, 2015, 2016, 2017). You can find her writing on her blog, The Worthington Post, and at The Broad Side, Purple Clover, Kveller, and Salon.

Groups audience: 

Avital Norman Nathman

Avital Norman Nathman is an editor for GrokNation and a freelance writer who writes about everything from parenting to pot and pop culture. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, VICE, Cosmopolitan, Rolling Stone, and more. Find her tweeting at @TheMamafesto.

Groups audience: 

Jasmine Banks

Jasmine is a queer Black feminist, a digital campaigner, community organizer, and licensed therapist.

Groups audience: 

Elisha Nain

Elisha Nain is a writer, producer, and singer living in Savannah, GA. She believes her multi-ethnic family, musical-loving Grandma Susan, and a near-death experience in Paris drove her to write. Nain is currently writing a narrative entitled, "How to be a Jewish Afro-Latina from Virginia."

Groups audience: 

Blood, Memories and Other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice
Memories are carried between generations in many different ways. Many of us — cultural workers, full spectrum birth workers and reproductive justice organizers of color — understand the importance to (re)learn and (re)member traditional medicine as we work towards body literacy, autonomy, and freedom. Menstruation can be a tool to better understand our bodies, track natural cycles, control fertility, and also learn about cultural and familial traditions around menstruation. In this session, we will talk about the importance of cultural preservation and menstrual education in reproductive justice, and share knowledge and experiences around holistic menstrual care. This is a closed space for people of color.
Speakers (click to view): Loba, NikoTiare

Blood, Memories and Other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Loba

La Loba Loca is a TortaQueer Feminista Abortista, Chocolla, Andina, South American migrant, artist, researcher, writer, handpoke tattooist, full spectrum companion/doula, aspiring midwife student, seed-saver, gardener, and yerbetera. Loba is currently based in Los Angeles, CA but constantly travels across Turtle Island and Abya Yala to facilitate shares and circles on herbalism, plant relations, social justice, healing justice, and autonomous health. In the past years, Loba has been delving into creating educational material and providing consulations/comadreo online to ensure the work is accessible to all. Loba is invested on disseminating information with the hope that self-knowledge and (re)cognition of abuelita knowledge will create a future where we can depend on ourselves and communities.

Groups audience: 

NikoTiare

NikoTiare is a shapeshifting queer of color currently based in Pomona, CA. Niko's work currently centers on facilitating support groups for trans students. At the core of their work, Niko aims to make theoretical models of identity development accessible through empowering individuals to share knowledge and experiences with each other. Niko believes a healthy, sustainable community begins with attempting to understand ourselves and each other.

Groups audience: 

Breaking It Down: Identifying and Smashing Barriers to Youth Sexual Health Care

Young people face unique barriers when accessing sexual and reproductive health care, such as: abortion notification laws, access to contraception, Title IX compliance at their institutions, and access to comprehensive sexual health education that reflects their lives, among others. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss barriers unique to young people and discuss the intersections of race, socioeconomic status, ability, gender identity and sexual orientation in a young person's capacity to access needed care. Through resource-mapping and collaborative brainstorming, participants will learn about strategies that they can use to help young people access community resources.

Speakers (click to view): Sadia Arshad, Eshani Dixit

Breaking It Down: Identifying and Smashing Barriers to Youth Sexual Health Care

Speakers

Sadia Arshad

Sadia Arshad is a reproductive justice nerd working in health communications during the day and doing youth empowerment and community engagement work at night. She fell into this work by accident, but couldn't be happier.

Groups audience: 

Eshani Dixit

Eshani Dixit is a senior at Rutgers University studying Political Science, Economics, and Women's and Gender Studies. She has served as a member of the Young Women of Color Leadership Council for the past four years and has been involved in reproductive health, rights, and justice advocacy for the past five.

Groups audience: 

Building our Future: Trials and Triumphs of Being Radical From the Inside Out
Hear directly from currently incarcerated individuals and build strategy and support with Justice Now activists in this interactive session. Presenters will share their vision of abolition and inspiring resilience through stories of the trials and triumphs of being radical from the inside out. Join us as we dream beyond prison walls to build a future free of prisons and state violence where families are whole and communities are supported.
Speakers (click to view): Misty Rojo (She/Her or They/Them), Allie Cislo (She/Her or They/Them)

Building our Future: Trials and Triumphs of Being Radical From the Inside Out

Speakers

Misty Rojo (She/Her or They/Them)

Misty Rojo comes to prison abolition work after leaving home at 14 and ultimately leaving an abusive relationship at 23, only to end up serving a 10 year prison sentence. While incarcerated, Misty was mentored by true activists and survivors, learning the meaning of self-determination and resilience. Misty's work focuses on campaigns to build coalitions and bring about policy change using an intersectional prison abolition framework. Misty has sponsored two California state bills that directly impact people in CA women's prisons and their families, and continues to work in collaboration with CA RJ groups to expand reproductive rights and access to care in prisons.

Groups audience: 

Allie Cislo (She/Her or They/Them)

Allie Cislo works at Justice Now, where she raises funds to dismantle and abolish the prison-industrial complex in solidarity with people in CA women's prisons. A queer Jewish anti-occupation organizer, full-spectrum doula, and sex educator, Allie is passionate about bringing attention and energy to the intersection of reproductive justice and the many manifestations of incarceration worldwide.

Groups audience: 

Criminalizing Pregnant People: the Next Phase of Controlling Our Bodies
Mass incarceration and human rights abuses in the criminal justice system are key concerns for the reproductive justice movement, with a variety of activists working to oppose and mitigate the harms that these systems have created for individuals, families, and communities. Laws and policies criminalizing pregnant people have undermined reproductive autonomy and rights. In particular, pregnant people who use drugs (even legal, prescribed ones) have become vulnerable to criminal prosecution all across the country. Attacks on reproductive rights and justice, the war on drugs, and efforts to put "personhood" measures on the books have advanced unscientific laws and increased stigma. Hear from activists and journalists about how communities are fighting back against this form of reproductive injustice.
Speakers (click to view): Allison Glass, Cherisse Scott, Laura Huss, Nina Martin

Criminalizing Pregnant People: the Next Phase of Controlling Our Bodies

Speakers

Allison Glass

Allison Glass first got connected to reproductive freedom after the home birth of her son as a young, single woman. She now serves as the State Director of Healthy and Free Tennessee where she leads a statewide coalition in shaping policy and fighting for reproductive freedom and sexual health. She has the honor and the challenge of working with, educating, and mobilizing opposition to Tennessee's (very, very red) legislators who far too often work against the interests of women and families.

Groups audience: 

Cherisse Scott

Cherisse Scott is the founder and CEO of SisterReach, Tennessee’s only reproductive justice organization. Under Ms. Scott’s leadership, SisterReach has released a 2015 report on the need for comprehensive sex ed for southern youth of color, rolled out their ProWoman Billboard campaign and presented to the United Nations Working Group on the Issue of Discrimination against Women in Law and Practice (UNWGDAW) on the impact of the fetal assault law on TN women.

Groups audience: 

Laura Huss

Laura Huss is Editorial and Research Associate at RH Reality Check. Laura received her Master’s from the University of Cape Town in South Africa studying social movements, activism, and community-based development. After graduate school she worked as a researcher in South Africa on issues relating to the incarceration of women, gender-based violence, and sexual assault. Prior to joining RH Reality Check, Laura worked at National Advocates for Pregnant Women where she advocated against punitive attacks on pregnant people, documented hundreds of arrests of pregnant people across the U.S., and conducted research on media misinformation about pregnancy and drug use.

Groups audience: 

Nina Martin

Nina Martin is a reporter for the nonprofit investigative news organization ProPublica, covering sex and gender, with a special interest in issues involving pregnancy and maternal health and well-being. She lives and works in Berkeley CA.

Groups audience: 

Deeds Not Words: Building Intergenerational Intersectional Activism Campaigns
Wendy Davis stood on the Texas Senate floor for 13 hours as she filibustered a conservative bill that would decimate the right of Texas women to access reproductive services. Since then, she’s built Deeds Not Words, a nonprofit focused on empowering the next generation to achieve equality for women. Our approach is intersectional. With a coalition of partners across various issues, we connect young people to campaigns and legislative efforts they can plug into; and in turn, we lift up the creativity and passion young people have to change the world. Young people are invited to learn core components of campaign building, activist and organizing best practices, and how to utilize your creativity and innovation as only your generations can. Everyone is invited to explore the power of intergenerational organizing as we build programming to train and mobilize students to advocate for what they believe in. We believe in engaging and listening to our young #Changemakers in order to provide them with tools to make lasting change.
Speakers (click to view): Wendy Davis (She/Her)

Deeds Not Words: Building Intergenerational Intersectional Activism Campaigns

Speakers

Wendy Davis (She/Her)

Wendy Davis is a former Texas State Senator. Known for her 13 hour filibuster to stop a sweeping anti-abortion bill, Davis founded Deeds Not Words last year to empower young women as the next generation of gender equity activists.

Groups audience: 

Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop
A common perception of the Manual Vacuum Aspiration (MVA) abortion is that the procedure is scary, complicated, and intense. The purpose of this Papaya workshop is to debunk this myth through education and hands-on activities for a non-clinical audience. Using papayas as uterine models, participants will be introduced and perform their own MVA abortion. In addition to physically practicing the procedure, the audience will also learn and role play patient-centered language. This workshop is an excellent way to bridge the gap between abortion providers and abortion advocates with no clinical experience. By gaining a comprehensive understanding of the actual medical procedure, audiences will be better informed and equipped as abortion activists and advocates. Participants will then take their newfound knowledge to help demystify abortion in their organizations and broader communities.
Speakers (click to view): Laura Riker, Hannah Biederman, Natalie Kopke

Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop

Speakers

Laura Riker

Laura is the Senior Program Manager at the Reproductive Health Access Project, where she organizes primary care clinicians from across the country to work together to expand access to comprehensive reproductive health care in primary care. Laura is a social worker with a background in Women’s Studies, and has previously worked in community mental health and interpersonal violence prevention. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Groups audience: 

Hannah Biederman

Hannah is a reproductive health care fellow at the Cambridge Health Alliance in Massachusetts. She attended the Mt. Sinai Beth Israel Family Medicine Residency in New York, NY.

Groups audience: 

Natalie Kopke

Natalie’s passion for reproductive justice is fueled by her past and current work with organizations striving to advance reproductive and sexual rights at the local, national, and international level. On her free time, Natalie volunteers with her local abortion fund. She plans to pursue graduate studies in reproductive rights and health policy.

Groups audience: 

Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop

A common perception of the Manual Vacuum Aspiration (MVA) abortion is that the procedure is scary, complicated and intense. The purpose of this Papaya workshop is to debunk this myth and other myths through education and hands-on activities for a non-clinical audience. Using papayas as uterine models, participants will be introduced to and perform their own MVA abortion on a papaya. In addition to physically practicing the procedure, the audience will also learn and role-play patient-centered language. By gaining a comprehensive understanding of the actual medical procedure, audiences will be better informed and equipped as abortion activists and advocates.

Speakers (click to view): Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre, Stephanie Blaufarb

Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop

Speakers

Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre

Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre works as a Research Associate at the Reproductive Health Access Project where she manages research studies about abortion, contraception, and miscarriage care. GG is also pursuing a Doctor of Public Health degree at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Groups audience: 

Stephanie Blaufarb

Stephanie Blaufarb became passionate about reproductive health during her Peace Corps service where she worked as a community health organizer for adolescent and women's health. Stephanie earned a BA/BS in international affairs from Northeastern University and an MPH from the CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter College. Her focus at the Reproductive Health Access Project has been communications, patient decision aids, and provider training in reproductive health.

Groups audience: 

Disability Justice 101
Disability justice is a multi-issue framework inextricably linked to our fights for reproductive, racial, gender, and economic justice, and queer and trans liberation. Disabled and chronically ill people have made critical interventions in our movement at every level, from informing how and why we create accessible spaces to reckoning with the reproductive rights movement's attachment to eugenics and ableism as political strategies. Join activist Dorian Taylor for an introduction to disability justice and exploration of its current and historical connections to reproductive health, rights, and justice work.
Speakers (click to view): Dorian Taylor

Disability Justice 101

Speakers

Dorian Taylor

Dorian Taylor is a gender nonbinary adaptive athlete for the U.S. paracanoe team. Paralyzed through police violence, autistic and living with lupus, they have survived homelessness, childhood institutionalization, and many other systemic forms of abuse. They now use those life experiences to continue to grow and shape the world around them in hopes to create social change.

Groups audience: 

Disability Justice and Reproductive Justice: Clarifying Our Values

In this closed, discussion-oriented session, attendees and facilitators will work together to articulate shared values for reproductive and disability justice that continue to center the needs and experiences of those most marginalized in our communities. We'll begin with a discussion of current barriers to anti-ableist reproductive justice work and move into visioning creative solutions for change. This session is a closed space for participants with disabilities or who identify as disabled, or who could otherwise be considered a part of/benefit from disability community. This includes physical disabilities, learning/cognitive disabilities, chronic illnesses and/or pain, neurological disorders, traumatic brain injuries, mental illness/emotional disabilities/psychic/psychiatric disabilities/madness/psychiatric survivors, Autistics, Deaf people, Blind people, all different kinds of neurovariance (including migraines, PTSD, epilepsy, et al.), and any kind of visible or invisible differences of bodies or brains including unusual appearances/deformities.

Speakers (click to view): Sasha Conley

Disability Justice and Reproductive Justice: Clarifying Our Values

Speakers

Sasha Conley

Sasha Conley is a fourth-year Division III student at Hampshire College studying Disability Studies, Art, and Creative Writing. She engages in work to improve accessibility on Hampshire's campus both physically and academically.

Groups audience: 

Doctor, Lawyer, or Activist? Navigating Cultural/Familial Expectations as “First” Generation
This identity caucus seeks to provide a safe space for first-generation immigrants, children of immigrants, and first-generation college students of color to discuss their experiences with navigating activism, especially around reproductive justice, with cultural expectations. There are certain expectations for children of immigrants or first-generation students of color: that when a family has made sacrifices, the child must do “better” or climb the economic ladder of success. We are creating this space as two individuals who struggle to explain our reproductive justice work to our families, and welcome others with similar experiences to join us for a facilitated discussion and strategy sharing session. This identity caucus will be a closed space for to those who self-identify as children of immigrants, immigrants, or first-generation students of color.
Speakers (click to view): Nicole Villacrés-Reyes, Sonia Mohammadzadah

Doctor, Lawyer, or Activist? Navigating Cultural/Familial Expectations as “First” Generation

Speakers

Nicole Villacrés-Reyes

Nicole Villacrés- Reyes is a senior at Mount Holyoke College in Western Massachusetts. She is a first-generation U.S. college student and an immigrant from Ecuador. She is a proud RRASC alum and believes the experience solidified her commitment to reproductive justice. Her current projects includes working on the accessibility of affordable housing in Springfield, MA.

Groups audience: 

Sonia Mohammadzadah

Sonia Mohammadzadah is a senior English major and Anthropology minor at Mount Holyoke College, hailing from Minneapolis, Minnesota. She is pursuing a 5 College Certificate in Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice. Her academic interests include narrative non-fiction, identity politics, intersectional feminism, and reproductive liberation. Sonia is a RRASC alum, and was a communications intern with Advocates for Youth in Washington D.C. last summer.

Groups audience: 

Don’t Drink the Water: Water Access is a Human Right and Reproductive Justice Issue
Access to safe and clean water is essential to everyone’s health and well-being, but many communities in the US don’t have safe water access. Reproductive, environmental, and racial justice advocates have pointed out that pollutants and toxins in our water supply threaten our children’s health and development, have impacts on reproductive health, and are more likely threaten communities that already suffer some of the worst impacts to environmental degradation and social inequality. The recent water crisis in Flint, MI has drawn new attention to the reality that safe water is something that low-income communities, people of color, and marginalized people and their families have never been able to take for granted. Come hear about how water access is a reproductive justice issue and how activists are fighting for this human right.
Speakers (click to view): Beata Tsosie-Peña, Shana M. griffin, Lindsay Schubiner

Don’t Drink the Water: Water Access is a Human Right and Reproductive Justice Issue

Speakers

Beata Tsosie-Peña

Beata Tsosie-Peña is an educator and poet from Santa Clara Pueblo. The realities of living next to a nuclear weapons complex has called her into environmental health and justice work with the local non-profit organization, Tewa Women United. She believes in the practice and preservation of land-based knowledge, spirituality, language, seeds, and family. Her intentions are for healing, wellness and sustainability for future generations.

Groups audience: 

Shana M. griffin

Shana griffin is a black feminist, mother, applied sociologist, activist, and artist based in New Orleans. Her work explores critical issues at the intersection of race and gender-based violence; housing rights and affordability; sexual health and reproductive autonomy; carceral violence and criminalizing policies; climate justice and sustainable ecologies; gender and disaster; reproductive violence and population control; and art and reimagination. Rooted in radical black feminist thought and organizing traditions, Shana’s research and activism challenges policies, practices, and behaviors that restrict, exploit, and regulate the bodies and lives of low-income and working class black women most vulnerable to the violence of poverty, carcerality, polluting environments, reproductive legislation, economic exploitation, and housing discrimination

Groups audience: 

Lindsay Schubiner

Lindsay Schubiner is the Senior Program Manager at the Center for New Community, where she works to counter organized nativism in the U.S. Lindsay previously served as a Congressional staffer handling immigration, housing, and health policy, and managed advocacy for sexual rights at American Jewish World Service. She holds a Master of Science from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Groups audience: 

Expanding Healthcare Access for Trans People
The reality for many trans folks is that getting access to healthcare continues to be a huge barrier. Come hear from activists and medical professionals who are expanding access to healthcare for trans people. Learn about the work of the Trans Buddy Program, which aims to increase access to care and improve healthcare outcomes for transgender people by providing emotional support to transgender patients during healthcare visits.
Speakers (click to view): Lauren Mitchell, Ricky Hill, Rj Robles, Zil Goldstein

Expanding Healthcare Access for Trans People

Speakers

Lauren Mitchell

Lauren Mitchell is one of the founders of The Doula Project, and part of the leadership team of Trans Buddy. She is also co-author of the upcoming book, The Doulas!: Radical Care for Pregnant People. It is her honor to have served over a thousand clients and have trained hundreds of activists, students, and clinicians over the past ten years.

Groups audience: 

Ricky Hill

Ricky Hill is a Jewish, chronically ill, transmasculine rabble-rouser originally from Oklahoma, radicalized in New Mexico, and currently living in Chicago, Illinois. Their work at the Chicago Center for HIV Elimination uses network science to target and integrate prevention, as well as create structural and community-specific interventions on the South Side of the city. They are passionate about understanding the ways in which social determinants of health impact LGBTQI health access and equity, as well as building sustainable service structures in resource deserts. They also believe that bolo ties are infinitely better than bow ties.

Groups audience: 

Rj Robles

Rj is a trans, disabled, Latinx living in the rural south. They love to write and perform their poetry through the art of spoken word. They work mostly in the trans community helping trans people get access to all forms of healthcare. They are academically interested in transgender studies, transgender theology, and pastoral care. They are a fierce community organizer and a student in seminary at Vanderbilt Divinity School. They are currently working on their M.Div, preparing for a life in ministry as an ordained Unitarian Universalist and as an aspiring academic.

Groups audience: 

Expanding Healthcare Access for Trans and/or Non-binary People
The reality for many trans folks and/or non-binary people is that their healthcare providers (and the leaders of the institutions that we must navigate) either don’t know what it means for trans and/or non-binary people to be healthy—or they have a narrow definition of health. Come learn from activists and medical professionals who are expanding access to healthcare for trans and/or non-binary people and expanding our definitions of what it means to be healthy. Access to hormones, abortion, and contraceptives; sexual health, pleasure, and safety; and campus services that provide healthy living are just a few of the intersections of gender and health that this panel seeks to unravel.
Speakers (click to view): Lyndon Cudlitz (He/Him), Cecilia M. Gentili (She/Her), Shawn Reilly (They/Them or Ze/Zir), Kimberly Mckenzie (She/Her)

Expanding Healthcare Access for Trans and/or Non-binary People

Speakers

Lyndon Cudlitz (He/Him)

Lyndon Cudlitz trains healthcare providers, community organizations, and others in providing relevant services for queer & trans individuals. As a result of this work, Planned Parenthood affiliates in Upstate NY are now successfully providing hormone access, as well as other trans-affirming reproductive healthcare. Lyndon’s 16 years in social justice advocacy and LGBTQ health education is strongly informed by his transfeminist and working-class perspectives.

Groups audience: 

Cecilia M. Gentili (She/Her)

Originally from Argentina, Cecilia Gentili started working as an intern at the LGBT Center where she found her passion for advocacy and services and after that she ran the Transgender Health Program at Apicha CHC from 2012 to 2016. She currently serves as the Director of Policy and Public Affairs at GMHC. She was a contributor to Trans Bodies Trans Selves and is a collaborator with Translatina Network.

Groups audience: 

Shawn Reilly (They/Them or Ze/Zir)

Shawn Reilly is in their final year at Vanderbilt University, where they study Human and Organizational Development, with a focus in education and social justice. While there, they have led a successful campaign to gain gender inclusive housing, and is currently organizing for living wages for union workers. Outside of school, Reilly's work centers around healing arts, education justice, labor organizing, and youth development.

Groups audience: 

Kimberly Mckenzie (She/Her)

Kimberly Mckenzie, Trans Woman of Color. SRLP Intern., Organizer and Advocate Dedicated to organizing around housing, healthcare and economic justice.

Groups audience: 

Fat and Disabled: What Birth Justice Means For Us
Often when we see images of what a doula is supposed to be it is often a skinny, WHITE, able-bodied ciswoman. When we think about what it means to be a parent we don't talk about the rich legacy of fat and disabled folks and the families we raise. Why? Because doctors, nurses and other gate keepers want to control our imagination and choices by saying that if you are fat or disabled you shouldn't have a baby or become a parent. We will hear from parents from different communities talk about what it means to be fat, disabled and part of a birth justice movement and what gets in the way of being able to participate in birth justice.
Speakers (click to view): Lucia Leandro Gimeno (They/Them or He/Him), Danny Boucher (She/Her)

Fat and Disabled: What Birth Justice Means For Us

Speakers

Lucia Leandro Gimeno (They/Them or He/Him)

Lucia Leandro Gimeno is an Afro-­Latinx, trans masculine femme counselor/bruja/organizer. Lucia Leandro lived in New York City for 15 years organizing with queer and trans communities of color. He is the Director of the Queer & Trans People Of Color Birthwerq Project, an organization dedicated to mending the disconnect between trans justice and reproductive justice. An expert chilaquiles maker, fashion queen and movement builder, some people say you can even hear his laugh from a mile away.

Groups audience: 

Danny Boucher (She/Her)

Danny Lee Boucher is a fat, white, femme, queer, 35-year-old, non-indigenous Texan recently relocated to Carrboro, NC with her partner and two kids. She is currently a stay-at-home-mom trying to figure out how to handle two toddlers with extreme parenting-related sleep deprivation. Danny is also an artist, fat activist, a home chef, and rabble rouser.

Groups audience: 

Feelin' Good: Deconstructing Pleasure and Identity
Sex occupies a strange place in our current culture, at once something desirable, a commodity, and a taboo. But what about pleasure? What are some associations we have with the word pleasure? Where do they come from? How do gender roles fit into personal understanding of pleasure? Through communal writing exercises, visual art, and group discussion, participants will explore how compulsive masculinity and femininity, as well as other aspects of hegemonic identity (race, class, ability, religions, status as a victim/survivor of assault, etc.), contribute to our individual concepts of pleasure, our personal relationship to pleasure, and the roles we take on with regard to talking about sex and having sex.
Speakers (click to view): Christina Tesoro (She/Her)

Feelin' Good: Deconstructing Pleasure and Identity

Speakers

Christina Tesoro (She/Her)

Christina Tesoro is a sex educator and writer from Queens, NY. She works with youth at Mount Sinai's Adolescent Health Center, focusing on sexual violence awareness and prevention, healthy sexuality and relationships, and strives to provide comprehensive sex ed particularly for QTPOC youth.

Groups audience: 

How Sex Ed Can End Child Sexual Abuse
The leading conversations about sexual assault/abuse are framed around power and control: sexual assault and abuse have less to do with the sex and more to do with power. Whether we agree with this long-standing idea or not, we must agree that SEX cannot be eliminated for the conversation of SEXual abuse, SEXual assault and rape culture. The aftermath of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) or sexual violence has tremendous effects on our sex(uality), our ability to form relationships and navigate safer sex. How can comprehensive sex education be a tool to end child sexual abuse? What ideas do we have culturally about teaching sex ed to children? How can sex ed foster reproductive justice for everyone? Join in the discussion to dissect this topic, share ideas, and engage in learning more about “the talk” and how to use it as a tool for empowerment and ending CSA.
Speakers (click to view): Ignacio Rivera

How Sex Ed Can End Child Sexual Abuse

Speakers

Ignacio Rivera

Ignacio Rivera is a trans-gender fluid activist, writer, educator, filmmaker, performance artist and mother. Ignacio has over 20 years experience on multiple fronts including economic justice, anti-racism, anti-violence, and feminist and LGBTQ movements. Ignacio is a 2016 Just Beginnings Collaborative Fellow. JBC is a movement building platform, initiating, cultivating and funding strategic efforts to end child sexual abuse.

Groups audience: 

Knowledge is Power – Putting Information about Safe Abortion with Pills into Our Hands
Knowing how to control our fertility is a basic right. This workshop will share two safe and effective protocols for ending an unwanted pregnancy/causing a miscarriage/bringing down your period. Knowledge is power!
Speakers (click to view): Oriana López Uribe, Susan Yanow MSW

Knowledge is Power – Putting Information about Safe Abortion with Pills into Our Hands

Speakers

Oriana López Uribe

Oriana López is a Mexican feminist who advocates for sexual and reproductive rights of young people and women at national, regional and international levels. She is the Deputy Director of Balance, a feminist organization in Mexico, and since 2009 she has coordinated the MARIA Fund. She is a member of the feminist alliance Resurj - Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice.

Groups audience: 

Susan Yanow MSW

A long-time reproductive rights activist, Susan Yanow works to expand access to abortion domestically and internationally through consulting projects with organizations including Ibis Reproductive Health, the Reproductive Health Access Project and Venture Strategies (VHSD). She is a cofounder of Women Help Women, an international organization that provides abortion and contraception services, and of the EASE Project (Expanding Abortion Services in the South) which is based in Alabama and Mississippi.

Groups audience: 

Moving From Desperation to Empowerment: Finding Your Place in Supporting People Who End Their Own Pregnancies
The future of abortion access is more uncertain than it has been in two generations. But instead of hopelessness, the seismic political shift has ignited interest in community-based and self-directed solutions. Uncertain times provide an unprecedented opportunity for creative and daring activism. Each of us has a role to play -- from destigmatizing self-induced abortion, to distributing information about how to end a pregnancy, to providing doula care to people who do. This session will provide an overview of legal issues surrounding self-induced abortion and will empower participants to assess the potential risks and rewards to their activism to support people who end their own pregnancies.
Speakers (click to view): Farah Diaz-Tello (She/Her), Kebé (She/Her), Emily R. Champlin (She/Her)

Moving From Desperation to Empowerment: Finding Your Place in Supporting People Who End Their Own Pregnancies

Speakers

Farah Diaz-Tello (She/Her)

Farah Diaz-Tello is Senior Counsel for the SIA Legal Team, where she wields law and policy tools to ensure that people can end their pregnancies with dignity without fear of arrest. Her career as a lawyer has been dedicated to the service of Reproductive Justice and Birth Justice. She’s a proud Texpat and mother of boys who love CLPP and justice.

Groups audience: 

Kebé (She/Her)

Kebé is an organizer who has used both legal advocacy and community organizing to build toward reproductive justice. She has worked with legal advocates to oppose state punishment of marginalized pregnant and parenting people, and sees community organizing as a powerful tool to increase access to abortion and oppose state violence in our communities.

Groups audience: 

Emily R. Champlin (She/Her)

Emily R. Champlin is a lifelong feminist and social justice advocate. After receiving her BA in Feminist Studies, she worked as a domestic violence advocate focusing on LGBTQ survivors. Throughout law school, she was avidly involved in studying and promoting reproductive justice. As a Fellow, her work focuses on the intersecting barriers of racism, limited English proficiency, immigration status, and cultural competency in accessing comprehensive health care.

Groups audience: 

Muslims and Reproductive Justice: Empowering Our Community Through Dismantling Stereotypes
Submissive. Oppressed. Conservative. Words consistently used to describe Muslim women in the age of mass Islamophobia. HEART Women and Girls will use a reproductive justice framework to discuss how stereotypes influence the lived experiences of Muslim people, deconstruct the Muslim American community, and present ways to empower (ourselves or others who are) Muslim survivors of sexual violence in the current age of Islamophobia.
Speakers (click to view): Sadia Arshad

Muslims and Reproductive Justice: Empowering Our Community Through Dismantling Stereotypes

Speakers

Sadia Arshad

Sadia Arshad is a virtual educator with HEART Women and Girls. Born and raised in Miami, studied up in Boston, and enjoying Atlanta, she is a public health reproductive justice nerd, focused on South Asian and Muslim community health needs.

Groups audience: 

Muslims and Reproductive Justice: Empowering our Community through Dismantling Stereotypes
Submissive. Oppressed. Conservative. Words consistently used to describe Muslim women in the age of mass Islamophobia. HEART Women and Girls will use a reproductive justice framework to discuss how stereotypes influence the lived experiences of Muslim people, deconstruct the Muslim American community, and present ways to empower (ourselves or others who are) Muslim survivors of sexual violence in the current age of Islamophobia.
Speakers (click to view): Sadia Arshad (She/Her), Sahar Pirzada (She/Her)

Muslims and Reproductive Justice: Empowering our Community through Dismantling Stereotypes

Speakers

Sadia Arshad (She/Her)

Sadia Arshad is a reproductive justice nerd working in health communications during the day and doing youth empowerment and community engagement work at night. She fell into this work by accident and couldn't be happier.

Groups audience: 

Sahar Pirzada (She/Her)

Sahar Pirzada is a graduate student with the University of Southern California Masters of Social Work program. She is the Programs and Outreach Manager for HEART Women & Girls and is passionate about creating safe spaces for Muslim survivors of sexual violence.

Groups audience: 

New Voices for Reproductive Justice
Join New Voices for Reproductive Justice in celebrating the growth of our movements and planning for continued expansion. Come to unpack key organizational strategies and movement insights through listening to presenters, engaging with media, group work and collective application. Using New Voices expansion programs in Philadelphia and Cleveland as a model, participants will learn about and interactively engage with central movement-building approaches such as: leadership development, integrated voter engagement, community organizing, and policy advocacy in the context of Reproductive Justice. Participants will engage with the complexities of turf navigation, program implementation, base-building, leadership recruitment, cross-state collaboration, and actualized allyship.
Speakers (click to view): Lexi J. White (She/Her), Ash Chan (She/Her), Jasmine Burnett (She/Her)

New Voices for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Lexi J. White (She/Her)

Lexi White is a health and wellness human rights advocate, community organizer, writer-poet and social justice scholar-activist. She focuses on Reproductive Justice and sexual and reproductive health and policy, rooting her work in the experiences and liberation of Black Women, Women of Color, and LGBTQ+ People of Color.

Groups audience: 

Ash Chan (She/Her)

Ash Chan, a Pittsburgh transplant by way of the Bay Area, is a queer youth organizer dedicated to education justice, equity and holistic wellness. Through leadership development and the sharing of lived experiences, Ash aims to create brave, youth-centered spaces to educate, affirm, and empower young folx of color with the skills and resources to become leaders in their schools, communities, and lives. Ash aspires for a long-term career in public health at the intersections of reproductive justice, human rights & environmental sustainability

Groups audience: 

Jasmine Burnett (She/Her)

Jasmine Burnett is a writer, consultant, social justice strategist, and entrepreneur who works as Director of Community Organizing with New Voices for Reproductive Justice. As a writer with Echoing Ida, a Black women's writing collective and program of Forward Together, she has been published on issues reflecting the range of Black women's leadership and visibility. As a creative, Jasmine is currently in the 7th cohort of Generative Fellows with the CoreAlign Generative Fellowship. She is also a 2017 fellow with the Rockwood Leadership Fellowship for Leaders in Reproductive, Health, Rights, & Justice.

Groups audience: 

New Voices, New Visionaries: Toward a Movement Led from the Frontlines//Nuevas voces, nuevas visionarias: hacia un movimiento guiado por lxs que están en el frente de la batalla
Join undocumented and previously detained trans and queer migrants as they discuss how their experiences have illuminated and defined the need for structural change in U.S. society to address racism, homophobia, transphobia, and immigration injustice. Through storytelling and audience participation, panelists will explore the ways that intersections of migration law, LGBT discrimination, and structural racism have shaped their lives.

Acompaña a migrantes queer y trans previamente detenidas e indocumentadas mientras ellas platican cómo sus experiencias han iluminado y definido la necesidad del cambio estructural en la sociedad de los E.E.U.U. para abordar los temas de racismo, homofobia, transfobia, y la injusticia de inmigración. A través de historias personales y participación de la audiencia las panelistas van a explorar de manera interseccional como leyes migratorias, discriminación anti-LGBT y racismo estructural han afectado sus vidas.

*lxs—en el español escrito, usamos la “x” para remplazar las terminaciones “o”, “a”, o “@” para palabras con género que hacen referencia a personas. Preferimos usar la “x” porque mostrar una resistencia al binario de género.
*elles—elles se usa como termino inclusivo de todos los géneros y para reconocer que hay personas que no se identifican con ningún género o con más de un género

This session will be presented in Spanish with simultaneous interpretation into English. If you need English interpretation, please arrive early, as interpretation headsets are limited.
Speakers (click to view):

New Voices, New Visionaries: Toward a Movement Led from the Frontlines//Nuevas voces, nuevas visionarias: hacia un movimiento guiado por lxs que están en el frente de la batalla

Speakers
New Voices, New Visionaries: Towards a Movement Led from the Frontlines / Nuevas voces, nuevas visionarias: hacia un movimiento guiado por lxs que están en el frente de la batalla

Join undocumented and previously detained trans and queer migrants as they discuss how their experiences have illuminated and defined the need for structural change in U.S. society to address racism, homophobia, transphobia, and immigration injustice. Through storytelling and audience participation, panelists will explore the ways that intersections of migration law, LGBT discrimination and structural racism have shaped their lives.

Acompaña a migrantes queer y trans previamente detenidas e indocumentadas mientras ellas platican cómo sus experiencias han iluminado y definido la necesidad del cambio estructural en la sociedad de los E.E.U.U. para abordar los temas de racismo, homofobia, transfobia, y la injusticia de inmigración. A través de historias personales y participación de la audiencia las panelistas van a explorar de manera interseccional como leyes migratorias, discriminación anti-LGBT y racismo estructural han afectado sus vidas.

*lxs – en el español escrito, usamos la “x” para remplazar las terminaciones “o”, “a”, o “@” para palabras con género que hacen referencia a personas. Preferimos usar la “x” porque mostrar una resistencia al binario de género.
*elles – elles se usa como termino inclusivo de todos los géneros y para reconocer que hay personas que no se identifican con ningún género o con más de un género.

This session will be presented in Spanish with simultaneous interpretation into English. If you need English interpretation, please arrive early, as interpretation headsets are limited.

Speakers (click to view): Dora Mejia, Karyna Jaramillo

New Voices, New Visionaries: Towards a Movement Led from the Frontlines / Nuevas voces, nuevas visionarias: hacia un movimiento guiado por lxs que están en el frente de la batalla

Speakers

Dora Mejia

Teodora Mejia Gaspar is a Mexican woman who has lived in Phoenix for 8 years. She is a grandmother and immigrant whose daughters receive DACA, a woman of faith, an activist, and program coordinator for Familias developing support, leadership, and family acceptance. She volunteers at AZ-QUIP/Arcoiris Liberation Team working for health of our communities.

Groups audience: 

Karyna Jaramillo

Karyna Jaramillo is a transgender woman from Cuernavaca, México who emigrated to Phoenix, AZ in 1989 to pursue work. She has spent years living the realities of racism, homophobia, and discrimination in Phoenix from society and from the police. She has been detained by ICE three times, and knows first hand how the government and those in power try to destroy the dreams of tod@s nosotr@s (all of us). Currently, Karyna coordinates Arcoiris Liberation Team/Arizona Queer Undocumented Immigrants Project (AZ QUIP), a project defending LGBTI migrant communities. She works with her community both outside and inside detention centers to fight for the rights and liberty of her community, and more broadly for the autonomy and power de cada un@ de nosotr@s (of each of us).

Groups audience: 

Not Our Burden: Young Parent Stigma and Intergenerational Impact
Four young mamas and our children will hold a multigenerational discussion on what it means to be a young mom and the child of a teen mom in the United States today. From being framed as public health issues and economic burdens to being criticized for our reproductive choices, our families face isolation, discrimination, and harmful stigmas. In this session, we will break down and unpack the history of young parent stigma, explain how seven young moms utilized new tech to drive policy change and culture shift, and share actionable steps people can take to support our restoration of power. Bring your questions, meet our family, and join us for this unique and special opportunity to celebrate young families.
Speakers (click to view): Christina Marie Martinez, Natasha Vianna, Marylouise Kuti, Amy Lopez

Not Our Burden: Young Parent Stigma and Intergenerational Impact

Speakers

Marylouise Kuti

Marylouise has worked to support young parents and their families in New Mexico and across the nation in breaking down barriers to accessing education, health care and other resources and supports.

Groups audience: 

Amy Lopez

Amy Lopez is a multimedia journalist based in Los Angeles who has written for FutMexNation and contributed to #NoTeenShame. As a young mom, she aspires to help eliminate the stigma surrounding teen parenting.
On the Phone and On the Web - The Challenges of National Grassroots Organizing
No salaries, no travel stipends, and no face-time. Leadership targeted by institutional violence, with changing phone numbers, no wifi and limited tech competency. Are you a community organizer committed to building national movements led by and for marginalized populations? These are examples of what we face. In this strategic session, facilitated by leaders of national organizations devoted to grassroots social justice activism, we will create space for individuals involved in national grassroots activism to share their trials, tribulations and triumphs, and we will brainstorm strategies to successfully include and engage our communities in the movements to effect social change.
Speakers (click to view): Katherine M. Koster (She/Her), Alex Andrews (She/Her)

On the Phone and On the Web - The Challenges of National Grassroots Organizing

Speakers

Katherine M. Koster (She/Her)

Katherine M. Koster has been involved in community organizing, education, and advocacy for women for over 6 years. In addition to working for SWOP-USA, she serves on the board of SWOP Behind Bars where she manages responding to letters from and meeting the needs of incarcerated women with sex trade experience.

Groups audience: 

Alex Andrews (She/Her)

As a formerly incarcerated sex worker and the co founder for SWOP Behind Bars, Alex Andrews knew it was critical to start reaching men and women who were experiencing the harm of the criminalization of sex work. As the North American Representative for NSWP, Alex hopes to amplify the voices of incarcerated sex workers around the world.

Groups audience: 

People's History of Adoption Justice
Throughout history, the state removal of children from their families and communities has been used as a genocidal attack on native communities and communities of color, further advanced and fueled by missionary interests. While complicated, the historical contexts of the Indian Child Welfare Act, transnational adoption, and the rights of youth in state custody are fundamentally about reproductive justice. Let's talk about adoption justice by examining modern practices of adoption through the historical context of colonialism. Through storytelling and an intersectional analysis, panelists will open a conversation about the implications of the oppressive origins of modern adoption practice and implementing a community justice approach to family creation within the intricacies of race, class, power and privilege, sovereignty, and self-determination.
Speakers (click to view): Yong Chan Miller (She/Her or They/Them), Coya White Hat-Artichoker (She/Her), Katie McKay Bryson (She/Her)

People's History of Adoption Justice

Speakers

Katie McKay Bryson (She/Her)

Katie McKay Bryson is a single mom & foster parent living on traditional Dena'ina territory in Alaska. Active in environmental, reproductive, and social justice movement work since her early teens, she's currently a grant writer for an Alaska Native tribal coalition, and works to build embrace of Indian Child Welfare Act rights among non-Native activists and foster/adoptive parents.

Groups audience: 

Population Control: Reproductive INjustice Coming from the Right and the Left
The right to choose not to have children is only a part of the fight for reproductive freedom. Policing communities of color through forced sterilizations, by denying access to reproductive services, and controlling family formation through social services and regulation of those deemed “unfit to parent” are all part of the historical legacy and ongoing practices of population control. Presenters will analyze domestic and international population control interventions by both state and non-state actors that target women of color, incarcerated women, and disabled people. Tactics that scapegoat immigrants for environmental problems or that rationalize the denial of reproductive rights as a conservation ethic and necessary means to address climate change will be addressed. Participants will walk away with a deeper understanding of the right to birth and parent as an integral component of reproductive justice.
Speakers (click to view): Ellen E. Foley (She/Her), Jade S. Sasser (She/Her), Rajani Bhatia (She/Her)

Population Control: Reproductive INjustice Coming from the Right and the Left

Speakers

Jade S. Sasser (She/Her)

Jade S. Sasser is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Riverside. She is currently writing a book about why population debates are becoming popular in the context of climate change. Her broader research interests include climate justice, international development, women’s health, and the intersections between gender and technology.

Groups audience: 

Rajani Bhatia (She/Her)

Rajani Bhatia's research interests lie at the intersection of reproductive technologies, health, bioethics and biomedicine. Her first book published by University of Washington Press on the topic of lifestyle sex selection is forthcoming.

Groups audience: 

Power, Pleasure, Profit: Radical Visions of Consent from Young Feminists
Join a panel of sex worker activists, sex educators, anti-rape advocates, and others to discuss how young feminists are building radical new definitions of consent and communication! This will be a participatory panel; audience members will be invited to reflect on and discuss their own definitions of consent. The ways we talk about sex are changing rapidly, and young voices are playing a central role in this evolving dialogue. Traditional definitions of consent — a concept originally borrowed from criminal law — are receiving tough criticism and being boldly reimagined. Sexual violence activists are pushing for legal requirements that go beyond consent; sex educators are reframing conversations about consent as pleasure-oriented instead of violence-avoidant; and sex workers are demanding recognition as consenting participants in a legitimate form of labor. We will explore questions that shape our current practices of consent, and consider alternative visions for cultural and legal definitions of sexual communication.
Speakers (click to view): Haylin Belay, Jenna Torres, Zoe Ridolfi-Starr, Sage Carson

Power, Pleasure, Profit: Radical Visions of Consent from Young Feminists

Speakers

Haylin Belay

With nearly a decade of hands-on experience teaching and developing sexual health education programming for youth and adults, Haylin Belay believes all people — regardless of age, orientation, identity, ability, or libido — deserve an integrated sex life and the safe pursuit of pleasure. She specializes in providing medically accurate information alongside the social, emotional, and cultural competencies needed to put that information to use.

Groups audience: 

Jenna Torres

Jenna Torres is a community advocate and human rights supporter. She is a published author, spoken word artist, entrepreneur, and above all a proud mother to three beautiful children! She believes people have agency to make the best decisions possible in order to survive. She defends them and works with communities to build realistic solutions to real life problems like violence, poverty, and discrimination. Jenna’s vision is to empower communities often overlooked and overcriminalized.

Groups audience: 

Zoe Ridolfi-Starr

Zoe is an advocate for gender equity and a fair legal system in New York. She serves on the Sex Education Alliance of NYC as the co-chair of policy. Previously, Zoe ran a youth advocacy program focused homelessness and the justice system, and served as Deputy Director of Know Your IX, where she trained student activists and led legislative advocacy efforts to address gender violence on campus. Her writing on sex and justice has been published in the Yale Law Journal, New York Daily News, ReWire, and other outlets.

Groups audience: 

Queering Reproductive Justice: Strength In Our Differences
Who we are and what we fight for are integrally connected, and the need to acknowledge and organize around our full selves is reinforced every day of the Trump Administration. Now more than ever, when the attacks seem relentless, we must ground ourselves firmly in a shared vision for intersectional base-building across the reproductive justice movement, recognizing that #MeToo is a queer issue; ableism is a repro justice issue; transphobia is a human rights issue; Islamophobia is a racial justice issue; and ultimately, we're all in this together. How do we affirm a truly queer analysis and approach to liberation that is radically inclusive? Come be a part of the conversation alongside writers, researchers, and activists working at the intersections of community care and holistic healing, black communities and reproductive health, transformative justice, research activism, body liberation, and LGBTQI freedom.
Speakers (click to view): Cole Parke, Renae Taylor, Joy Messinger, Brienne Colston

Queering Reproductive Justice: Strength In Our Differences

Speakers

Cole Parke

Cole Parke has degrees in theology and conflict transformation, and has been working at the intersections of faith, gender, and sexuality as an activist, organizer, and scholar for more than a decade. Their research and writing examines the infrastructure, mechanisms, strategies, and effects of the Religious Right on LGBTQ people and reproductive rights, both domestically and internationally, always with an eye toward collective liberation.

Groups audience: 

Renae Taylor

Renae Taylor is a 43 year old Non-Binary Trans person located in Memphis, TN. Renae is involved in many social and racial justice organizations. Renae is also a member of their local HIV Care and Prevention Planning Group.

Groups audience: 

Joy Messinger

Joy Messinger is a queer, disabled, femme organizer of spreadsheets, funding, and people to build sustainability, healing, wellness, and power for reproductive justice, queer and trans liberation, and disabled, migrant, and POC communities. As Third Wave Fund's Program Officer, she oversees Third Wave's rapid response, multi-year general support, and capacity building grantmaking and supports its cross-sector philanthropic advocacy.

Groups audience: 

Brienne Colston

Brienne Colston is a Black queer feminist youth worker, facilitator, and community organizer hailing from the South Bronx. Colston is the founder of Brown Girl Recovery, a collective dedicated to prioritizing healing justice and providing community spaces to womxn of color in the Bronx and other uptown areas through social justice programming and events. A graduate of Lawrence University with degrees in Gender Studies and History, Colston found her passion in small town grassroots organizing and resistance work. In addition to working with BGR, Colston serves as a racial justice & political education facilitator for an array of small community-based organizations including the Audre Lorde Project, and directs their first-ever queer/trans/non-binary POC choir! She has facilitated healing justice-based workshops and community gatherings at institutions such as the United Nations, the Posse Foundation, Sadie Nash Leadership Project, Black Women's Blueprint, and Spelman College. A self-described "fatBlackSUPERwomxn," Colston is eager to hold space for dope Black and Brown femmes everywhere!

Groups audience: 

Queering Reproductive Justice: The Unfinished Revolution
Our issues and people are not separate, we are interconnected. But our movements’ goals have become increasingly narrow and limiting. What is our vision for intersectional base-building across the reproductive justice movement? How do we re-center a truly queer analysis and approach to liberation that is radically inclusive? Come to hear from activists working at the intersections of safety and economic justice, immigrant rights, health and educational equity, gender and reproductive justice, and LGBT liberation.
Speakers (click to view): Sean Saifa Wall, Cecilia Sáenz Becerra, Cole Parke, Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz, Kenyon Farrow

Queering Reproductive Justice: The Unfinished Revolution

Speakers

Sean Saifa Wall

Sean Saifa Wall is an intersex artist and activist whose goal is to create a world that is safe for Black bodies and intersex bodies to exist in. You can connect with him on social media or through his website, saifaemerges.com.

Groups audience: 

Cecilia Sáenz Becerra

Cecilia is a bilingual immigrant, queer, Chicana, y desmadrosa! She has grassroots, community organizing, coalition building and management experience on various issues and campaigns, including labor rights, education, economic justice and immigration justice. Raised in PHX she now lives in ATL, providing support, strategy and technical assistance to front-line advocates and grassroots organizers across the country who exist along a varied spectrum of reproductive rights and reproductive justice politics.

Groups audience: 

Cole Parke

Cole Parke is the LGBTQ & Gender Justice Researcher at Political Research Associates, a social justice think tank based in Boston. Their research and activism focuses on exposing and challenging right-wing propagators of U.S. culture wars both here and abroad through the Know Your Neighbors campaign (www.kynship.org).

Groups audience: 

Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz

Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz is the Vice President of Programs and Development for the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. She has worked in several movements for social justice with a particular emphasis on building grassroots political power across movements, issues, identities and communities. As a capacity builder, movement builder, cultural worker and writer Weiner-Mahfuz has dedicated much of her organizing life to challenging oppression at the intersections of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and disability. Her writings can be found in Colonize This! Young Women of Color and Feminism (Seal Press, 2002), Fireweed Magazine's “Mixed Race Issue” (Issue 75), and through on a Web-based project titled BustingBinaries, which she co-authors with Ana Maurine Lara.

Groups audience: 

Kenyon Farrow

Kenyon Farrow is a writer and activist. He is the US & Global Health Policy Director with Treatment Action Group. His writing has appeared in many books and publications, and he's working on a collection of essays and a new book on global health and racial justice.

Groups audience: 

Reproductive Justice 101
Reproductive Justice was coined in 1994 by Women of African Descent for Reproductive Justice, a group of Black women who recognized that the white-led women's rights movement was not prioritizing issues critical to women of color, and that we must represent our own communities. This workshop will discuss a little bit of the history of RJ as well as give participants a chance to express their RJ stories. The workshop also involves understanding what's at stake for folk who are often left out of reproductive justice considerations such as trans women and trans non-binary folks.
Speakers (click to view): Ashley Williams

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers
Reproductive Justice 101
Heard the term reproductive justice thrown around a lot? Not really sure what it means or where it comes from? As a framework that many social justice organizations and activists base their work on, it’s important for us to understand what it is we are talking about. Join us to have some of those questions answered and engage in a dialogue on the history, meaning, and application of reproductive justice in our work toward achieving reproductive freedom. Hear from facilitators working on reproductive justice in a number of capacities and figure out what it means for you!
Speakers (click to view): Namrata Jacob, Chiara Forrester

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers

Namrata Jacob

Namrata is a third year student at Hampshire College studying legal anthropology and reproductive justice, a restless piece of the South Asian diaspora, a lover of dogs and ironic jokes that got too serious and permanent, and a fan of karaoke. She lives for potentially witnessing the anti-capitalist social revolution and Mary Mary releasing another album together, maybe, someday.

Groups audience: 

Chiara Forrester

Chiara is a senior at Hampshire College where she studies the ecology of plant-fungal symbioses as well as how Participatory Action Research could be used to make Citizen Science research projects more meaningful and empowering. She was part of the CLPP student group for two years, serving as a Childcare Co-Chair last year.

Groups audience: 

Reproductive Justice in the Age of Mass Incarceration
What does reproductive (in)justice look like behind bars? How are certain communities disproportionately impacted by policing and incarceration? And how can we hold onto a dream of abolition while making real, tangible changes in the lives of those most impacted by mass incarceration? Focusing on the lived experiences of women, trans, and gender non-conforming people in prisons and jails, this session will expand participants' understanding of how sexism, racism, classism, and gender-based violence underpin systems of mass incarceration. Speakers will discuss innovative organizing models for mobilizing both inside and outside of the prison system for justice for those who are currently or formerly incarcerated and their families.
Speakers (click to view): Nia Weeks, Lill Hewko, Jill McCracken

Reproductive Justice in the Age of Mass Incarceration

Speakers

Nia Weeks

Nia Weeks the director of Policy and Advocacy at Women With A Vision, located in New Orleans, Louisiana. She is a native of New Orleans, and has spent years fighting for the rights of women, children, and families. As a former public defender and the inaugural Director of Policy and Advocacy for WWAV, her goals for the department is to cover not only broad, national trends, but also take a specific deep dive into the conditions of all Black women.

Groups audience: 

Lill Hewko

Lill Hewko, a queer, trans nonbinary, mixed-Latinx from a working-class background, is a prison abolitionist and reproductive justice lawyer focusing on race, gender, child welfare, incarceration, and healing. Lill co-founded the Incarcerated Parents Project and the Incarcerated Mothers Advocacy Project, and is a founding board member of Surge Reproductive Justice. Lill is an attorney at the Transgender Law Center and works with QTPOC Birthwerq Project.

Groups audience: 

Jill McCracken

Dr. Jill McCracken is an Associate Professor of Rhetoric at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg and the Co-Founder/Co-Director of Sex Workers Outreach Project (SWOP) Behind Bars, an organization that provides community support for incarcerated sex workers and connects incarcerated sex workers in U.S. prisons and jails to the sex worker rights movement. Her primary areas of research focus on sex work and trafficking in the sex industry, the impact of sexuality education on marginalized communities, and women who are incarcerated.

Groups audience: 

Southern Black Healing and Resistance

This is a closed session for people of color, especially those rooted or working in the South. This interactive workshop will explore the role and importance of Black healers and healing traditions in shaping and sustaining lives in the South. In this workshop, we will specifically honor traditions that were sustained and developed by Black folks on the shores of Turtle Island (America). With participants, we will walk through a condensed history of Black southern healing traditions, examining how we took what we knew, integrated what was here, and developed rituals, medicines, tools and practices for survival and quality of life right here in the South. Additionally, we will vision a trajectory for healing justice and birth justice in communities of color, while discussing, sharing, and honoring the root traditions of our spiritual and cultural grandmothers.

Speakers (click to view): Jamarah Amani, Tamika Middleton

Southern Black Healing and Resistance

Speakers

Jamarah Amani

Jamarah Amani is a Licensed Midwife who believes in the power of birth and that every baby has a human right to be breastfed. Her mission is to do her part to build a movement for Birth Justice locally, nationally and globally. A community organizer from the age of sixteen, Jamarah has worked with several organizations across the United States and in Africa on various public health issues, including HIV prevention, infant mortality risk reduction, access to emergency contraception, access to midwifery care and an end to shackling of incarcerated pregnant/birthing people.

Groups audience: 

Tamika Middleton

Tamika Middleton is an organizer, birthworker, and homeschooling mama. She is passionate about and active in struggles that affect Black women’s lives. She sometimes performs as a member of The NALO Movement. She is also passionate about birthing and healing, and is the coordinator of Kindred Southern Healing Justice Collective.

Groups audience: 

Stigma Free Parenting
A central tenant of reproductive justice is the ability to decide if and when to have children. But many people in our communities face stigma--stigma that is compounded by their parental status. Parents in our communities are targeted with constant critical scrutiny and are threatened with losing their parental rights. How can we, as a community, unite to reduce stigma attached to parenting--based on race, health status, immigration, age, incarceration experience, and sexuality? Panelists will discuss their experiences as parents who face stigma and working with scrutinized parents in order to explore the universality of parenting, the unique challenges that some families face, and ways that we are creating supportive communities for families.
Speakers (click to view): Jaspreet Chowdhary (She/Her), Lorena García Zermeño (She/Her), Kenzie Wood, Sequoia Ayala (She/Her), Shantell V. Gomez (She/Her)

Stigma Free Parenting

Speakers

Jaspreet Chowdhary (She/Her)

Jaspreet Chowdhary received a B.A. in English and Women’s Studies from Goucher College, a M.P.H. in Epidemiology from Tulane University, and a J.D. from Seattle University School of Law. She is currently the Senior Policy Specialist at the 30 for 30 campaign. She was part of the inaugural class of the If/When/How Fellowship program and was placed at the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum.

Groups audience: 

Lorena García Zermeño (She/Her)

Lorena García Zermeño is the Program Coordinator for California Latinas for Reproductive Justice where she spearheads their long-term initiative, Justice for Young Families (J4YF). She studied Anthropology and Feminist Studies at UC Santa Cruz with a concentration in Law, Politics, and Social Change. RJ has helped her learn to channel her voice and passion for social justice into advocacy work and be unapologetically chingona.

Groups audience: 

Sequoia Ayala (She/Her)

Sequoia Ayala received her law degree and master’s degree in International Relations from the American University Washington College of Law and School of International Service, respectively. As the Law and Policy Fellow at SisterLove, Sequoia works collaboratively with community members, elected officials, and policymakers in advancement of the health, well-being, and human rights of Black women living with HIV/AIDS, those at risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, and for all individuals who belong to marginalized communities that are severely and disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS, especially in the Deep South and Global South. Additionally, she is a Georgia licensed attorney who provides low-cost legal assistance in family law and immigration. A proud University of Georgia alumna and native Georgian, Sequoia resides in Atlanta with her husband and two sons.

Groups audience: 

Shantell V. Gomez (She/Her)

Shantell V. Gomez is a member of California Latinas for Reproductive Justice’s Young Parent Leaders Council (YPLC). She is a fierce young parent advocate and proud momma to her 4-year-old son, Aidan. Shantell works part-time while studying English at Mount Saint Mary’s University in Los Angeles and is planning on pursuing a master’s degree to obtain her teaching credentials.

Groups audience: 

Talking With Conservative Family and Friends About Abortion
It’s common to feel frustrated, angry, and/or drained by conversations with people we care about who hold deeply conservative views on reproductive health, especially abortion. The disconnection can be very painful, especially when it’s close family or friends. Often the differences involve religious beliefs, which can be particularly hard to negotiate. Often the sense of urgency and passion we feel is at odds with the reality that changing deeply held beliefs is an uncertain and often extremely slow process. In this interactive workshop, we will explore approaches and skills for having more productive conversations across ideological divides. We will review research on how liberals and conservatives construct morality differently, share experiences, and consider some new approaches. We will also examine different ways of defining success in these interactions. with the twin goals of reducing cultural stigma against abortion and maintaining (or maybe even improving) these potentially challenging relationships.
Speakers (click to view): Latishia James, M.Div., Madeline Blodgett, Rev. Rob Keithan

Talking With Conservative Family and Friends About Abortion

Speakers

Latishia James, M.Div.

Latishia James is a trauma-informed facilitator, counselor, and advocate with almost 10 years of experience in sexual and reproductive justice. After earning her Master of Divinity from Pacific School of Religion, Latishia began a consulting practice, where she supports survivors of religious and/or sexual trauma, facilitates workshops, and provides faith-based counseling to people making an array of reproductive decisions.

Groups audience: 

Madeline Blodgett

Madeline Blodgett, MPH is a facilitative leader, researcher, and collaboration designer leveraging empathy, evidence, and human-centered design to create culture change.

Groups audience: 

Rev. Rob Keithan

Rev. Rob Keithan is the Minister of Social Justice at All Souls Church Unitarian in Washington, DC. His passion is working for long-term culture change in ways that engage the complex issues of religion, race, morality, and reproductive health.

Groups audience: 

Talking with Conservative Friends and Family about Abortion
It’s common to feel frustrated, angry, and/or drained by conversations with people we care about who hold deeply conservative views on reproductive health and especially abortion. Especially when it’s close family or friends, the disconnection can be very painful. Often the differences involve religious beliefs, which can be particularly hard to negotiate. Often the sense of urgency and passion we feel is at odds with the reality that changing deeply held beliefs is an uncertain and often extremely slow process. In this interactive workshop, we will explore approaches and skills for having more productive conversations across ideological divides. We will review research on how liberals and conservatives construct morality differently, share experiences, and consider some new approaches. We will also examine different ways of defining success in these interactions. with the twin goals of reducing cultural stigma against abortion and maintaining (or maybe even improving) these potentially challenging relationships.
Speakers (click to view): Rev. Rob Keithan (He/His)

Talking with Conservative Friends and Family about Abortion

Speakers

Rev. Rob Keithan (He/His)

Rev. Rob Keithan is a faith organizing and training consultant specializing in reproductive health, rights and justice, intercultural communication, and congregational social justice programs. He is currently focused on long-term culture change related to abortion and reproductive health in ways that engage the complex issues related to religion, morality, and race.

Groups audience: 

Telling Our Stories To Create Change

This session, by and for young people, will introduce participants to the power and art of effective storytelling for advocacy. Participants will learn how stories have sparked critical movement moments and lead to lasting change. Facilitators will share key components of narratives that engage an audience and provide space for participants to practice storytelling to hone their skills. Participants will also identify their own reproductive justice stories and begin to think about how to share them to shift cultural values. Please be aware that participants will be asked to think about their reproductive justice/injustice experiences

Speakers (click to view): Prina Patel, Simran Kaur

Telling Our Stories To Create Change

Speakers

Prina Patel

Prina Patel grew up in rural Oregon and attended Smith College for undergraduate education. At Smith, Prina began her studies in neuroscience, but by her senior year realized that she wanted to pursue a career in reproductive justice policy and activism. Prina would like to attend law school in the near future, and continue advocating for minoritized populations.

Groups audience: 

Simran Kaur

Simran Kaur was born, raised, and educated in Salt Lake City, Utah. With degrees in gender studies and chemistry, she is currently pursuing an MD at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Simran hopes to deliver and engage in culturally-relevant reproductive and sexual health care to minoritized populations.

Groups audience: 

Yonce Taught Me: Black Femme Formations

In the time of Beyonce, much of what we learn about Black Femininity comes from outside of the black femm[inine] community. How can we use our collective super powers to re-construct a flawless feminism that centers black culture? In this workshop we will develop strategies for interrupting transphobic and anti-black representations of black femininity as well as build a stronger network of black cis femmes in solidarity with our black trans femm[inine] family. This is a closed workshop geared towards black folks (trans, cis, and gender nonconforming) who are femme or ID somewhere on a feminine spectrum.

Speakers (click to view): Che Johnson-Long

Yonce Taught Me: Black Femme Formations

Speakers

Che Johnson-Long

Che J. Long is a Queer Black Femme, community organizer, and trained herbalist who hails from Los Angeles. She is currently the Program Director of Georgia Womens Action for New Directions developing Black Rural strategies for challenging the Nuclear Industry.

Groups audience: 

Zines! Putting Consent into Practice

Isn’t it nice when someone asks before giving you a hug? Let’s talk about setting boundaries and practicing consent to demonstrate respect for our bodies and our communities. We’ll explore a framework for consent, create a toolbox of language, and engage in dialogue that builds healthy relationships. Push back against rape culture with the creative and accessible medium of mini (maga)ZINES as a platform for radical communication!

Speakers (click to view): Allison Scott, Jena Duncan

Zines! Putting Consent into Practice

Speakers

Allison Scott

Allison Scott is a creative queer Bay Area babe who recently moved to the Pioneer Valley to explore all the wonderful art and activism! With consent and open communication as leading values, Allison works to build healthy relationships, support youth empowerment and grow and expand community. Creating safe and supportive spaces for people to express and explore themselves is Allison's passion.

Groups audience: 

Jena Duncan

Jena Duncan is an art maker and youth worker that builds life in the abundant pioneer valley with a heart warming community. Her creative endeavors explore the meaning and production of identity and culture. She teaches on a variety of topics and is interested in creating safe and supportive spaces for all identities to engage in something with passion. Her faithful sidekick is a cat named Sophie.

Groups audience: 

Saturday Session 2: 3:15PM - 4:45PM

A Teen Parent Inclusive Movement

The ability to decide when and how to have children is a crucial aspect of the reproductive justice movement. Throughout history, some women have been discouraged, coerced and outright prevented from being parents, including teen parents. Young people who have children are often stigmatized, shamed, and disenfranchised in their role as parents. This workshop seeks to foster a conversation on the intersectional issues impacting young parents, explore the contributions that young parents bring to the reproductive justice movement, and discuss the ways in which stigma against young parents is upheld through the reproductive control of youth.

Speakers (click to view): Christina Martinez, Gloria Malone, Natasha Vianna, Lisette Engel

A Teen Parent Inclusive Movement

Speakers

Christina Martinez

Christina Martinez is an early childhood educator and community correspondent for Sacramento Voices, a project of the Maynard Institute for Journalism. In her work and writing, Christina is dedicated to elevating the stories of young parents & their children.

Groups audience: 

Gloria Malone

Gloria Malone is a writer, social media consultant, and speaker. She is a member of Echoing Ida, co-founder of #NoTeenShame, and the founder of TeenMomNYC.com. Connect with her on twitter @GloriaMalone.

Groups audience: 

Natasha Vianna

Natasha Vianna is a rebelde in tech, a repro justice activist, and co-founder of #NoTeenShame.

Groups audience: 

Lisette Engel

Lisette Engel is co-founder of the #NoTeenShame movement. She's an advocate, public speaker, blogger and mama based in the Washington, D.C area. Lisette has lobbied on Capitol Hill for programs that support young families and is active in promoting policies that support young women to make their own reproductive choices.

Groups audience: 

A Timeline Installation on Resiliency Strategies to Transform the Medical Industrial Complex
The medical industrial complex is an industry based on pathologizing the most marginalized communities–including Black & People of Color, People with Disabilities, low income, incarcerated, LGBTQGNC & Two Spirit, and immigrant communities, and so many others who have been experimented on, policed, and institutionalized–under the guise of 'national security' and 'healthy communities'. We will explore notions and history of 'health and healthy' in relationship to capitalism, population control, and policing our bodies through scientific racism and medicalization. We will build on to a timeline installation of what it means to individually and collectively resist and transform these histories towards our collective well-being outside of the state.
Speakers (click to view): Cara Page

A Timeline Installation on Resiliency Strategies to Transform the Medical Industrial Complex

Speakers

Cara Page

Cara Page is a Black queer feminist cultural worker & organizer. She is the current Executive Director of the Audre Lorde Project, an Organizing Center in NYC for Lesbian, Gay, Bi, Two Spirit, Trans & Gender Non-Conforming People of Color. For the past 20+ years she has worked within the LGBTSTGNQ liberation movement, and the reproductive, racial and economic justice movements.

Groups audience: 

Abortion Access in Latin America / El acceso al aborto en América Latina

Latin America is home to five of the seven countries in the world in which abortion is banned in all instances, even when the life of the pregnant person is at risk. Ninety five percent of people of reproductive age in the region live under abortion restrictions, and unsafe abortion is estimated to be the cause of one out of every eight pregnancy/birth-related deaths. The laws criminalizing abortion in the region have been inherited from colonial powers, the legacy of the Spanish and Portuguese empires; today, the global agenda of the religious right fuels opposition to abortion. Come to this session to hear how activists are mobilizing to reclaim reproductive rights as human rights.

Cinco de los siete países en el mundo en los cuales el aborto esta penalizado en todas las instancias, incluso cuando la vida de la mujer esta en peligro, se encuentran en America Latina. El noventa y cinco por ciento de las mujeres en edad reproductiva viven en lugares en donde las leyes restringen el acceso al aborto. Se estima que el aborto ilegal es la causa de una de cada 8 muertes maternas. Estas leyes que penalizan el aborto son el legado de los imperios español y portugués. Hoy, la agenda global de la derecha religiosa es la que continua oponiéndose a la despenalizacion del aborto. Ven a esta sesión a escuchar como activistas de la region se estan movilizando para reclamar que los derechos de las mujeres son derechos humanos.

This session will be presented in Spanish with simultaneous interpretation into English. If you need English interpretation, please arrive early, as interpretation headsets are limited.

Speakers (click to view): Cora Fernandez Anderson, Yaneris González Gómez , Cristina Quintanilla, Oriana López Uribe

Abortion Access in Latin America / El acceso al aborto en América Latina

Speakers

Cora Fernandez Anderson

Cora Fernandez Anderson is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Latin American Politics at Hampshire College. Her research focuses on human rights and women's movements in Latin America. She is currently researching the campaigns to decriminalize abortion in the Southern Cone countries.

Groups audience: 

Yaneris González Gómez

Yaneris González Gómez has been an activist for over 15 years working with grassroots organizations and community groups on issues such as human rights, gender based violence, youth’s sexual and reproductive health and rights, HIV and AIDS and vulnerabilized communities, LGBTQQI+ rights, racism, immigrant rights, and more. Yaneris is an “artivist” using arts for justice.

Groups audience: 

Oriana López Uribe

Oriana López is a Mexican feminist who advocates for sexual and reproductive rights of young people and women at national, regional and international levels. She is the Deputy Director of Balance, a feminist organization in Mexico, and since 2009 she has coordinated the MARIA Fund. She is a member of the feminist alliance Resurj - Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice.

Groups audience: 

Abortion Access: Threats and Resistance
Session description: Efforts to restrict access to safe and legal abortion persist, disproportionately affecting the most vulnerable people in our society and worldwide. Panelists will talk about current barriers to access and discuss activist strategies to reduce stigma and broaden conversations about abortion beyond the experiences of cisgender women; funding networks for abortion; fighting back against the criminalization of self-induced abortion; and campaigns that position the right to abortion within the broader reproductive justice and human rights frameworks.
Speakers (click to view): Jack Qu'emi Gutierrez (They/Them), Oriaku Njoku (She/Her or They/Them), Marlene Gerber Fried (She/Her), Farah Diaz-Tello (She/Her)

Abortion Access: Threats and Resistance

Speakers

Oriaku Njoku (She/Her or They/Them)

Oriaku Njoku, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast, works at the intersection of abortion access and reproductive justice. She supports Southerners in navigating pathways to accessing safe, affordable, and compassionate abortion care through funding, practical support, and advocacy. She truly believes that we can and will create a cultural shift around how we talk about abortion in the South.

Groups audience: 

Marlene Gerber Fried (She/Her)

Marlene Gerber Fried is a long time abortion rights and reproductive justice advocate, faculty director of CLPP, founding president of the National Network of Abortion Funds and the Abortion Rights Fund of Western MA, Co-author with Silliman, Ross and Gutierrez of Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Freedom, Recipient of the NNAF Vanguard Award, the Felicia Stewart Advocacy Award, SisterSong Women Warrior Award, Board Member of Our Bodies Ourselves.

Groups audience: 

Farah Diaz-Tello (She/Her)

Farah Diaz-Tello is Senior Counsel for the SIA Legal Team, where she wields law and policy tools to ensure that people can end their pregnancies with dignity without fear of arrest. Her career as a lawyer has been dedicated to the service of Reproductive Justice and Birth Justice. She’s a proud Texpat and mother of boys who love CLPP and justice.

Groups audience: 

Amplifying Voices: People Living with HIV/AIDS Fight a Pandemic
What will it take to end the HIV/AIDS pandemic? This panel will explore the relationship between the complex experiences of people living with HIV/AIDS, the research that quantifies their experiences, and how these experiences are used to advocate for policy change. In order to beat this pandemic, we will hear from people living with and affected by HIV, as well as advocates, and discuss how to protect and support our communities of color, immigrant communities, women, girls, and/or trans/non-binary people who are most affected. Participants will leave armed with a discussion of how to amplify voices in the community while advocating, researching, and moving forward an HIV policy platform.
Speakers (click to view): Jaspreet Chowdhary (She/Her), Bré Anne Campbell (She/Her), Nelson Rafael Roman (He/Him), Sequoia Ayala (She/Her)

Amplifying Voices: People Living with HIV/AIDS Fight a Pandemic

Speakers

Jaspreet Chowdhary (She/Her)

Jaspreet Chowdhary received a B.A. in English and Women’s Studies from Goucher College, a M.P.H. in Epidemiology from Tulane University, and a J.D. from Seattle University School of Law. She is currently the Senior Policy Specialist at the 30 for 30 campaign. She was part of the inaugural class of the If/When/How Fellowship program and was placed at the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum.

Groups audience: 

Bré Anne Campbell (She/Her)

Bré Anne Campbell is the Executive Director and Co-Founder of the Trans Sistas of Color Project – Detroit. She is a board member of Positive Women's Network USA, a 2015 Victory Fund Empowerment Fellow, a National Advisory Board member of Positively Trans and a member of the 2016 Brown Boi LGBT Executive Director Training Program. She is featured in the Greater Than AIDS "EMPOWERED: Trans Women & HIV" campaign. She also serves as an Executive Producer of a forthcoming documentary exploring the narratives of TWOC in Detroit.

Groups audience: 

Nelson Rafael Roman (He/Him)

Ward 2 City Councilman Nelson Rafael Roman was born and raised in Waterbury, CT. Councilman Roman moved to Holyoke in 2011 and immediately becoming immersed in the culture and fabric that makes Holyoke unique. Overcoming obstacles such as homelessness, contracting HIV and poverty, Councilman Roman immediately began giving back and organizing in the Puerto Rican and LGBT Communities. He has worked for or with many Holyoke Non-for-profits such as Enlace de Familias, New England Farm Workers Council, LightHouse Personalized Education for Teens, Valley Opportunity Council & Nueva Esperanza to name a few. He is currently the Administrative/Volunteer Coordinator for Lorraine's Soup Kitchen & Pantry in Chicopee.

Groups audience: 

Sequoia Ayala (She/Her)

Sequoia Ayala received her law degree and master’s degree in International Relations from the American University Washington College of Law and School of International Service, respectively. As the Law and Policy Fellow at SisterLove, Sequoia works collaboratively with community members, elected officials, and policymakers in advancement of the health, well-being, and human rights of Black women living with HIV/AIDS, those at risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, and for all individuals who belong to marginalized communities that are severely and disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS, especially in the Deep South and Global South. Additionally, she is a Georgia licensed attorney who provides low-cost legal assistance in family law and immigration. A proud University of Georgia alumna and native Georgian, Sequoia resides in Atlanta with her husband and two sons.

Groups audience: 

Artivism 101: How Arts and Culture Are Integral to Our Fight for Reproductive Freedom
In order to build new futures, we must first imagine them. And it will take creativity to address long-standing problems facing our communities. Now, more than ever, the role of artists and cultural workers are essential in our social movements. In this session, we will identify and discuss how artists and cultural workers work on their own and partner with institutions to create performances, illustrations and other works that advance reproductive freedom. Using the technology of improvisation and freestyle, the workshop will culminate with the sacred tradition of the cypher. We will devise mantras, call and responses, poetry, rap, rhythm and movement to co-create a collective freedom song that honors our visions for bodily autonomy and reproductive justice.
Speakers (click to view): Taja Lindley (She/Her)

Artivism 101: How Arts and Culture Are Integral to Our Fight for Reproductive Freedom

Speakers

Taja Lindley (She/Her)

Taja Lindley is a healer, artist, and writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She is the Founder and Managing Member of Colored Girls Hustle, and a member of Echoing Ida and Harriet's Apothecary. Her writing has appeared in EBONY, Salon, Rewire and YES! Magazine. www.TajaLindley.com / www.ColoredGirlsHustle.com

Groups audience: 

Beyond Ramps and Rights: Disability and Its Significance for Social Justice Movements
Plenty of disabled/chronically ill folks are an integral part of all communities, resistance movements, history and cultures. Yet we still largely exist relegated to the margins and the cracks of even progressive spaces. Truth is: social justice movement can’t effectively fight homo/transphobia, misogyny, racism or be in solidarity with immigration, or Sovereignty struggles without a working understanding of Ableism. Why? Because it works as a mechanism of white supremacy, colonialism, eugenics, sexual violence, capitalism and the state control of bodies. Not exactly sure how this is true? Come find out! Become part of a growing movement of progressive communities working to deliberately integrate a disability justice practice into the core of their work.
Speakers (click to view): Sebastian Margaret (They/Them), Xautle Alba-Pizaña (They/Them)

Beyond Ramps and Rights: Disability and Its Significance for Social Justice Movements

Speakers

Sebastian Margaret (They/Them)

Sebastian Margaret is an anti-ableism/disability justice community educator. A Disabled TGNC queer immigrant, they are kept deliciously exhausted and hopeful parenting a pair of gorgeous kids. They are passionate about the validity and glory of imperfect body/minds and eroding the exclusion and segregation faced by disabled folks in progressive spaces. Sebastian has been inserting/revealing disability justice issues into progressive movements, and supporting multi-issue capacity and vibrancy in disability communities for decades. sebastian@eqnm.org

Groups audience: 

Xautle Alba-Pizaña (They/Them)

Xautle Alba-Pizaña is a multiply disabled entity, pushing for single issue efforts to be developed into movements that see the human experience as complex as it truly is.

Groups audience: 

Birthing a Movement
This workshop will explore how control over birthing experiences has been a part of the broader fight for reproductive rights and body sovereignty. Speakers will discuss the history of medicalized birth, racism's role in creating health disparities, the move of birth out of the hands of midwives, efforts to address obstetric violence, and efforts to expand the doula and midwifery models of care. We will highlight the need for education, access, and support for marginalized pregnant/birthing/parenting people, including young people of color, incarcerated people (and those under correctional supervision), and immigrants and undocumented people. Folks in these communities often have the least access to quality care and birth options, but the greatest need. Whether you squat to release a pregnancy or squat to birth your baby, midwifery care can be lifesaving and life-affirming.
Speakers (click to view): Sabia C. Wade, Indra Lusero, Jamarah Amani, Farah Diaz-Tello, Symone A. New, Kerry McDonald

Birthing a Movement

Speakers

Sabia C. Wade

Sabia Wade is a full spectrum doula, a reproductive justice advocate and aspiring home birth midwife. As a queer woman of color, she finds it imperative to create health related infrastructure that is accessible to all members of every orientation and identity - across every socio-economic status.

Groups audience: 

Indra Lusero

Indra Lusero is a reproductive justice attorney and entrepreneur and proud to have been named “All Around Reproductive Justice Champion” by the Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights. Indra is the founder and director of Elephant Circle and the Birth Rights Bar Association.

Groups audience: 

Jamarah Amani

Jamarah Amani is a Licensed Midwife who believes in the power of birth and that every baby has a human right to be breastfed. Her mission is to do her part to build a movement for Birth Justice locally, nationally and globally. A community organizer from the age of sixteen, Jamarah has worked with several organizations across the United States and in Africa on various public health issues, including HIV prevention, infant mortality risk reduction, access to emergency contraception, access to midwifery care and an end to shackling of incarcerated pregnant/birthing people.

Groups audience: 

Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah Diaz-Tello, JD, is a Senior Staff Attorney at National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW). Her work focuses on the rights to medical decision-making and birthing with dignity, and on using the international human rights framework to protect the humanity of pregnant women regardless of their circumstances. A proud Texan, she is an alumna of UT Austin & the CUNY Law School.

Groups audience: 

Symone A. New

Symone New is The Doula Project's External Partnerships Coordinator and has practiced as a full-spectrum doula since 2010. In addition to her passion for reproductive justice, Symone enjoys cooking, reading, farmers markets, tea, and theater. In equal measure, Symone is a proud native New Yorker, CLPP and RRASC alum.

Groups audience: 

Kerry McDonald

Kerry McDonald is a full spectrum Doula. She works with Prison Birth Project, where she facilitates a childbirth education group in prison and provides Doula services to incarcerated folks. Kerry is based in Boston and in the Hudson River Valley.

Groups audience: 

Black Lives Matter Panel
Join folks from the Black Lives Matter Global Network for a discussion about reproductive justice and Black LIves Matter. The challenges to whole and healthy Black lives are vast and varied, ranging from body autonomy to police brutality to poisoned water in Flint, MI, and more. This will be an interactive workshop that digs into how we approach our work and what that actually means for Black lives and futures.
Speakers (click to view): Miski Noor (They/Them), Shanelle Matthews (She/Her), Nikita Mitchell (She/Her), Briana Perry (She/Her)

Black Lives Matter Panel

Speakers

Miski Noor (They/Them)

Miski Noor is an organizer and writer based in Minneapolis, MN where they work as a Communications Strategist for the Black Lives Matter Global Network and a leader with the local Black Lives Matter--Minneapolis chapter. They are a graduate of the University of Minnesota where they studied Political Science and African and African-American Studies. As a Black, African, immigrant queer person, Miski is committed to working to create a world in which Black life is protected and our collective liberation is realized.

Groups audience: 

Shanelle Matthews (She/Her)

Shanelle Matthews is an award-winning political communications strategist with a decade of experience in journalism as well as legislative, litigation, rapid response, and campaign communications. She serves as the Director of Communications for the Black Lives Matter Global Network, organizing to end state-sanctioned violence against Black people by building power and winning immediate improvements in the lives of Black people.

Groups audience: 

Nikita Mitchell (She/Her)

Nikita Mitchell is the Director of Organizing for Black Lives Matter. She started in Black Lives Matter as a chapter member of BLM Bay Area. She believes in the power of this organization because of its ability to affirm Black Lives, while also disrupting the power dynamics that tries to ensure our termination. She started community organizing in high school around educational justice, and hopes to continue organizing, as it is our duty to win.

Groups audience: 

Briana Perry (She/Her)

Briana Perry is a Black feminist born, raised, and currently situated in the South. Her work centers around Black feminism, reproductive justice, storytelling, and punitive disciplinary policies within schools. She is in community with the official Black Lives Matter Memphis Chapter, the Nashville Feminist Collective, and Healthy and Free Tennessee.

Groups audience: 

Blood, Memories and other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice
Memories are carried between generations in various ways. Many of us, cultural workers, full spectrum birth workers and Reproductive Justice organizers of color understand the need to (re)learn and (re)member traditional medicine as we work towards body literacy, autonomy and freedom. Menstruation can be a tool to better understand our bodies, track natural cycles, control fertility and also learn about cultural and familial traditions. In this gathering, we will talk about the importance of cultural preservation and menstrual education in reproductive justice, and we will share knowledge and experiences around holistic menstrual care.
Speakers (click to view): La Loba Loca (She/They/Loba)

Blood, Memories and other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice

Speakers

La Loba Loca (She/They/Loba)

La Loba Loca is based in so-called Los Angeles. Loba is a Queer Machona South American Migrant, zine maker, writer, tattooist, crafter, full spectrum companion, aspiring midwife student, seed-saver, and gardener. La Loba Loca is invested in disseminating information with the hope that self-knowledge and (re)cognition of #abuelitaknowledge will create a future where we can depend on ourselves and communities. La Loba Loca’s core philosophy is based on (re)claiming and (re)membering Abuelita Knowledge and learning how to use our roots as a tool for liberation and transformation. IG:@lalobalocashares,lalobaloca.com, facebook.com/lalobaloca, lalobaloca.bigcartel.com

Groups audience: 

Building Student Power & Organizing for Reproductive Justice
This workshop will be a space for students to share skills, tools, strategies, and experiences related to organizing for reproductive justice on college campuses. Participants will leave with a communication network and a collaborative list of tangible strategies and tools for our organizing work. We will go back to our campuses with a stronger sense of our identities and of ways in which we can center womxn and people of color in our movements. We will also critically examine our own organizing work to ensure we are embodying the reproductive justice framework and centering the voices and lived experiences of those most impacted by reproductive injustices.
Speakers (click to view): Nargis Aslami, Namrata Jacob

Building Student Power & Organizing for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Nargis Aslami

Nargis is a 21 year old Afghan-American woman, majoring in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at UMass Amherst and pursuing the 5 College Reproductive Rights, Health, and Justice Certificate. She has been one of the Student Group Co-Coordinators for CLPP for the past two years. In this position, she plans and facilitates weekly meetings on topics of reproductive justice and intersecting social justice movements, and plays a key role in organizing CLPP's annual conference. She also works as a rape crisis counselor and a medical advocate for survivors of sexual assault. Nargis is just around the corner from graduating from UMass, and plans to attend law school within the next year or two to continue pursuing social justice work.

Groups audience: 

Namrata Jacob

Namrata Jacob is a reproductive justice activist, recent college graduate, diasporic South Asian gal, and strong believer that anything can be made into a themed party if one tries hard enough. Her work focuses on critically connecting the historical production of race and reproduction under U.S empire. Namrata has worked with a number of organizations and conferences, and CLPP is #1 in her heart.

Groups audience: 

Bye Bye Fake Clinics: Using Direct Action to Target CPCs in Your Community
Crisis Pregnancy Centers (CPCs) — otherwise known as fake women's health centers (FWHCs) — threaten the health and safety of our communities by providing false and harmful information to those dealing with unintended pregnancies. Presenters from Reproaction, Advocates For Youth's 1 in 3 Campaign, and Lady Parts Justice will give examples of successful direct action campaigns, online and in the streets, so participants can spur change in their communities to shed light on the predatory tactics and goals of FWHCs, which are the subject of a Supreme Court case that will be decided later this spring.
Speakers (click to view): Shireen Rose Shakouri, Lorne Batman, Shomya Tripathy

Bye Bye Fake Clinics: Using Direct Action to Target CPCs in Your Community

Speakers

Shireen Rose Shakouri

Shireen is a proud DC voter and Campaign Lead at Reproaction. Formerly a Middle East/South Asia foreign policy analyst, she turned to reproductive justice work a year ago after spending years volunteering for pro-choice and sexual health causes in college (GWU '13) and thereafter. She is Iranian and Italian-American, and loves to cook those cuisines and almost everything else.

Groups audience: 

Lorne Batman

Lorne serves as the Online Community Manager at Lady Parts Justice League, a reproductive rights nonprofit that brings support to independent clinics across the U.S. and uses humor and pop culture to expose haters fighting to end abortion access. She is a graduate of Boston University and the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. Her favorite moment of all time was officiating her moms' wedding in 2015. #LoveWins

Groups audience: 

Shomya Tripathy

Shomya Tripathy is the Senior Manager of the Youth Activist Network at Advocates for Youth. Through the 1 in 3 Campaign, she works with young people around the country to challenge abortion stigma on their campuses and in their communities.

Groups audience: 

Coming Home: The Love & Struggle Between Trans & Reproductive Justice

In reproductive justice there has been a growing question around where and how trans identity, issues and movement building intersects. How do we build stronger connections to trans movement building within reproductive justice that also uplifts and honors the work of cis women of color? What are the barriers to building stronger solidarity across movements? How can we begin to build models of collaboration from a place of wholeness, history and accountability? Join us as we share reflections and questions, identify historical and present day models that have built containers to house our intersecting movements, and connect those who are interested in building a national gathering of trans people of color and supporters to talk about trans birth and reproductive justice.

Speakers (click to view): Lucia Leandro Gimeno, Rye Young, Marianne Bullock, Micky Bee, Jasmine Burnett

Coming Home: The Love & Struggle Between Trans & Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Lucia Leandro Gimeno

Lucia Leandro Gimeno is an Afro-Latinx, trans masculine femme bruja/organizer based in Atlanta, GA. A graduate of Columbia University’s School of Social Work, LL lived in New York City for 15 years organizing with queer and trans people of color communities. A current member of Black Lives Matter – Atlanta chapter, LL is also a future full-spectrum birthworker doing capacity building with The Queer & Trans People of Color Birthwerq Project to help mend the disconnect between trans justice and reproductive justice.

Groups audience: 

Rye Young

Rye Young is the Executive Director of Third Wave Fund (www.thirdwavefund.org) which supports and strengthens youth-led gender justice activism focusing on efforts that advance the political power, well-being, and self-determination of communities of color and low-income communities. He serves on the Board of Directors of the New York Abortion Access Fund and Funders for LGBTQ Issues, and serves on the advisory board of A is For. Rye is passionate about expanding opportunities for communities who are most affected by oppression yet remain marginalized in our movements and in philanthropy. He is an avid cook, and ferocious lover of bingo.

Groups audience: 

Marianne Bullock

Marianne Bullock is one of the founders and Directors of The Prison Birth Project. She is an organizer and full spectrum doula.

Groups audience: 

Micky Bee

Micky Bee is a magical Black transfemme army brat turned performance artist. She has worked four years in Atlanta on HIV/AIDS prevention and Co-directs the “Southern Fried Queer Pride” festival. Currently, she is the Regional Organizer for the Transgender Law Center at Southerners on New Ground collaboration. She is determined to get “10s” across the board for Trans/GNC people in the South.

Groups audience: 

Jasmine Burnett

Jasmine Burnett is a national organizer, writer and strategist in the Reproductive Justice movement. She serves as the Field Director with New Voices for Reproductive Justice. She leads and expands their work in the "Rustbelt Region," home to the most politically volatile and racially conservative Northern states in the U.S.

Groups audience: 

Contraceptive Equity: Safety, Access, and Reproductive Justice
This session will center a discussion on contraceptive equity and reproductive freedom as it relates to the core of reproductive justice. In order to build a broad picture of contraceptive equity and bodily autonomy, panelists will address marketing, counseling, and prescription of contraceptives within a context of racism, sexism and cissexism, and reproductive coercion and oppression. In order to move towards freedom, we must understand the inequities prescribed by the targeted marketing and disproportionate prescription of LARCs (long-acting reversible contraceptives, such as IUDs and hormonal implants) and hormonal injections. Panelists will discuss access to resources (information, healthcare, and financial support) as necessary for reproductive choice for vulnerable populations, including cis-gender women of color, people living in poverty, and trans men & gender-nonconforming people.
Speakers (click to view): Dr. Krystal Redman (She/Her), Emma Cohen Westbrooke (She/Her), Lyndon Cudlitz (He/Him), Whitney Peoples (She/Her)

Contraceptive Equity: Safety, Access, and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Dr. Krystal Redman (She/Her)

Dr. Redman brings over 12 years of experience in managing low-income and women focused public health access and community-based youth development programs. Prior to her current tenure as Executive Director of SPARK Reproductive Justice Now, Dr. Redman served as the Senior Project Director of Maternal and Child Health, at the Georgia Department of Public Health, where she worked on creating greater healthcare access for women throughout the state of Georgia. Dr. Redman received her Bachelors of Science in Sociology from The University of California, Riverside and a Masters of Health Administration from The University of Southern California, Los Angeles. She received her Doctorates of Public Health from Loma Linda University in Loma Linda, California.

Groups audience: 

Emma Cohen Westbrooke (She/Her)

Emma Cohen Westbrooke works as a sexuality educator for Planned Parenthood of the Southern Finger Lakes in Ithaca, NY providing justice-oriented sexuality education for rural middle and high school aged folks. Her energy goes towards uplifting and celebrating LGBTQ youth and being a white co-conspirator for racial justice work in her community.

Groups audience: 

Lyndon Cudlitz (He/Him)

Lyndon Cudlitz trains healthcare providers, community organizations, and others in providing relevant services for queer & trans individuals. As a result of this work, Planned Parenthood affiliates in Upstate NY are now successfully providing hormone access, as well as other trans-affirming reproductive healthcare. Lyndon’s 16 years in social justice advocacy and LGBTQ health education is strongly informed by his transfeminist and working-class perspectives.

Groups audience: 

Whitney Peoples (She/Her)

With fifteen years experience in feminist and critical race research, activism, and teaching, Dr. Whitney Peoples has spoken and written on the intersections of race, gender, and popular culture. She has published critical essays on topics including hip-hop feminism, advertising for oral contraceptives, and representations of women in African American film.

Groups audience: 

Criminalized Bodies: State Violence in the 21st Century
Mass incarceration, surveillance, policing, environmental racism, and the criminalization of poverty are some of the violences imposed on communities of color by the state. How can — and do — our movements work to combat the realities of state-sanctioned violence, economic injustice, and racism? Join this panel of activists that have mobilized against state violence from Standing Rock to New York City's immigration courts to Louisiana’s “prison capital of the world.”
Speakers (click to view): Rage Kidvai, Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa, Pamela Merritt, Ashley Nicole McCray

Criminalized Bodies: State Violence in the 21st Century

Speakers

Rage Kidvai

Rage is a public defender in Brooklyn Criminal Defense practice of the Legal Aid Society. They also work with 5 Boro Defenders focusing on prosecutor accountability and immigration issues. Prior to this, Rage was an Equal Justice Works Fellow in the Sylvia Rivera Law Project’s Immigrant Defense Project. Rage is a graduate of CUNY Law School and Hampshire College.

Groups audience: 

Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa

Mwende “FreeQuency” Katwiwa is a 26 year old Kenyan freedom fighter, writer, and performer. Katwiwa is an internationally touring author, host, youth worker, social justice lecturer, teaching artist, and workshop leader who has spent her life at the intersection of arts, education, and activism. She works at Women With A Vision, Inc in New Orleans, is a member of BYP100, and is a proud auntie.

Groups audience: 

Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

Groups audience: 

Ashley Nicole McCray

Ashley Nicole McCray is a grassroots indigenous organizer from the Oglala Lakota Nation and Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma. Ashley fights on behalf of indigenous liberation, racial justice, and the environment in Oklahoma and across Indian Country.

Groups audience: 

De-colonial Dreams: a family roundtable on raising parents and kids with radical values
Many of us were raised either by a parent or a caregiver. Some of us were raised in the streets. How do children and young people, hopefully destined to become adults, learn collectivity, embody difference as joy, consent, boundaries and other radical ideas? How do parents build a foundation of decolonizing systems and concepts of power in an everyday way? What are helpful ways for parents to get in touch with their own feelings and internal biases when raising young people? What do kids teach parents about how to be better parents to themselves and to their kids? This session is not about telling you how to raise your children. It is a workshop to hear from kids, young people and their parent or caregivers about how they are building new or different ways of growing up to be autonomous, loving, discerning and that there are all kinds of people who are fat, disabled, queer and trans. It will be a playful roundtable of families so feel free to bring your kids, teenagers, or the young ones in your life that you are invested in.
Speakers (click to view): Jamarah Amani, Hadassah, Mahoro, Nalubaale and Mosiah, zahra alabanza, cassius and marley, Selena Velasco and Elijah, Carter Klenk-Morse, Saoirse and Rowan, Lucia Leandro Gimeno

De-colonial Dreams: a family roundtable on raising parents and kids with radical values

Speakers

Jamarah Amani, Hadassah, Mahoro, Nalubaale and Mosiah

Jamarah Amani is a community midwife and mother of four. Her mission is to do her part to build a movement for birth justice locally, nationally and globally. A community organizer from the age of 16, Jamarah has worked with several organizations across the United States, the Caribbean, and in Africa on various public health issues. She is currently the director of Southern Birth Justice Network, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.

Groups audience: 

zahra alabanza, cassius and marley

Zahra is a life enthusiast. She is a mother, organizer, creative, and adventurer. A project starting, wandering, overlover and outdoor junkie. She utilizes space curation, outdoor adventure, food justice, yoga(ing), and being a creative as the root of her community organizing efforts to enhance the quality of life among Black folk. Her work centers Black women and children and meets at the intersection of justice, living in one's values, healing, quality of life and Black Liberation. She is humbly a co-visionary of the Anna Julia Cooper Learning and Liberation Center where her insights and skills further the development of liberatory living and learning spaces. Currently she serves as the Conference Organizer for the Money for Our Movements National Conference, Co-Founder of Black Freedom Outfitters, and Red, Bike and Green-Atlanta. Cassius is the eldest of the #cassiusandmarley brother duo. He uses cooking, his artistic abilities, and humor to make people happy. He enjoys playing basketball and riding his penny board. In his spare time he likes planting garlic. marley is the youngest in the #cassiusandmarley brother duo. He loves people and talking. He likes drawing, building lego cities, and sharing random facts. He is excited about learning how to build and draw better.

Groups audience: 

Selena Velasco and Elijah

Selena Velasco is a brown queer, nonbinary femme mother to a nine year old brown child. Selena is a community organizer at API Chaya as the Queer Network Program Coordinator, supporting healing spaces for Queer and Trans survivors of violence. They are also a visual artist, poet, and tender loving Virgo residing on indigenous Coast Salish and Duwamish Territory in Seattle.

Groups audience: 

Carter Klenk-Morse, Saoirse and Rowan

Carter Klenk-Morse is queer, anarchist mother and radical unschooler living with her partner and children, Rowan (8) and Saoirse (6), in rural Vermont. She is a facilitator, organizer, and trainer with two decades of experience. Carter is a former board member of the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, YouthAction, the Third Wave Foundation, and the Colorado Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

Groups audience: 

Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop
A common perception of the Manual Vacuum Aspiration (MVA) abortion is that the procedure is scary, complicated, and intense. The purpose of this Papaya workshop is to debunk this myth and other myths through education and hands-on activities for a non-clinical audience. Using papayas as uterine models, participants will be introduced to and perform their own MVA abortion on a papaya. By gaining a comprehensive understanding of the actual medical procedure through the use of patient-centered language and interactions, participants will be better informed and equipped as abortion activists who can demystify abortion in their own communities and advocates who can create change at the clinic level.
Speakers (click to view): Naomi Legros (She/Her), Lael Greenstein M.D. (She/Her), Laura Riker (She/Her)

Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop

Speakers

Naomi Legros (She/Her)

Naomi Legros is the operations associate at the Reproductive Health Access Project and almost approaching a year with the organization. Her responsibilities support the backbone of the organization, from conference logistics, to HR coordination, website and SEO management, and coordinating RHAP's volunteer program. She is passionate about highlighting reproductive health disparities that are prevalent in communities of color and learning how to maintain intersectionality and inclusivity. Uplifting people of color, especially black womxn is the drive that keeps her going in these trying times.

Groups audience: 

Lael Greenstein M.D. (She/Her)

Lael Greenstein, M.D. is the Reproductive Health and Advocacy Fellow at the Tufts University Family Medicine Residency at Cambridge Health Alliance, where she is being trained to become a provider and teacher of full spectrum reproductive health within family medicine. Her areas of interest are underserved medicine, women’s health and improving access to reproductive health within the community health care setting.

Groups audience: 

Laura Riker (She/Her)

A background in Women’s Studies and abortion advocacy led Laura Riker to social work school, where she interned at a community health center and learned about about the clinical side of reproductive rights. At the Reproductive Health Access Project, she organizes primary care clinicians from across the country to work together to expand access to comprehensive reproductive health care.

Groups audience: 

Fund Abortion, Build Power! Activism for Direct Service and Movement Building

Abortion funds, particularly in the South, are innovating around what it means to address immediate abortion access needs while working towards long term cultural and political change; in other words, what it means to fund abortion and build power. In pursuit of reproductive justice, abortion funds are also transforming the practice of funding from a charitable action into a movement building vehicle by working to center the leadership of people from communities most affected by abortion access issues. In this interactive session, attendees will simulate building their own abortion funds using a reproductive justice framework and explore topics such as intake, volunteer recruitment, leadership development, fundraising, and movement building.

Speakers (click to view): Bianca Campbell, Tiffany Tai

Fund Abortion, Build Power! Activism for Direct Service and Movement Building

Speakers

Bianca Campbell

Bianca Campbell is the Movement Building Coordinator at the National Network of Abortion Funds, where we believe in funding abortion + building power. She writes with the Echoing Ida crew and is a board member of ARC-Southeast, a new reproductive fund and advocacy organization in Atlanta, GA. She's previously been an abortion counselor and labor doula. Connect with her @biancaacamp.

Groups audience: 

Tiffany Tai

Tiffany Tai is the Member Support Coordinator at the National Network of Abortion Funds, where she provides organizational development and capacity-building support to abortion funds across the country. She is also a founding member of the Boston chapter of the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum. Tiffany is a RRASC alum and UMass Amherst alum.

Groups audience: 

HIV/AIDS is a Reproductive Justice Issue!
Mass Incarceration. Poverty. Homophobia. Gender Inequity. Lack of Access to Quality Healthcare. What's really fueling the HIV/AIDS pandemic? This panel will explore the political and public health context of HIV/AIDS, review recent policy wins and losses that affect the lives of people living with HIV and their families, and discuss oppressive policies and patterns that make some communities the most vulnerable to the virus and its effects. Let's talk about how we can turn the tide together!
Speakers (click to view): Renae Taylor, Ricky Hill, Kenyon Farrow

HIV/AIDS is a Reproductive Justice Issue!

Speakers

Renae Taylor

Renae Taylor is a community organizer and activist working for trans communities, communities impacted by HIV/AIDS, and Black liberation.

Groups audience: 

Ricky Hill

Ricky Hill is a Jewish, chronically ill, transmasculine rabble-rouser originally from Oklahoma, radicalized in New Mexico, and currently living in Chicago, Illinois. Their work at the Chicago Center for HIV Elimination uses network science to target and integrate prevention, as well as create structural and community-specific interventions on the South Side of the city. They are passionate about understanding the ways in which social determinants of health impact LGBTQI health access and equity, as well as building sustainable service structures in resource deserts. They also believe that bolo ties are infinitely better than bow ties.

Groups audience: 

Kenyon Farrow

Kenyon Farrow is a writer and activist. He is the US & Global Health Policy Director with Treatment Action Group. His writing has appeared in many books and publications, and he's working on a collection of essays and a new book on global health and racial justice.

Groups audience: 

Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-Based Sex Ed for All
Our formal, school-based sex education is lacking. But what about our sexual pleasure education? It’s practically non-existent. How do we learn to make ourselves and our partners feel sexual pleasure? Often by accident, often by guess-and-check, and way-too-often in ways that are terribly misinformed by Google, social mores, and sweeping generalizations about what “everyone likes." This workshop will explore how we learn about pleasure by touching on some of our most pleasurable spots—the G-Spot, C-Spot (clitoris), and P-Spot (prostate). Where are these spots? Why do they feel good? What kind of sex toys, lubricants and communication strategies can we use to help us make them feel good? Walk away feeling empowered by new knowledge about how to bring yourself and your partners intentional pleasure in a straight-forward and relaxed learning environment. Propel radical sex education forward by starting in the most familiar place: with your own bodies, between your own sheets. This workshop does not equate anatomy with gender and will use language in line with those beliefs.
Speakers (click to view): Yana Tallon-Hicks

Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-Based Sex Ed for All

Speakers

Yana Tallon-Hicks

Yana Tallon-Hicks is a therapist, sex columnist, and a consent, sex and sexuality writer and educator living in Northampton, MA. She is a graduate of Hampshire College where she studied LGBTQ+ community and sex education, and is a RRASC alum. Her work centers around the belief that pleasure-positive and consent-based sex education can positively impact our lives and the world.

Groups audience: 

Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-based Sex Education for All

Our formal, school-based sex education is lacking. But what about our sexual pleasure education? How do we learn to make ourselves and our partners feel sexual pleasure, confidently and consensually? This workshop will explore how we learn about consensual pleasure by discussing some of our most pleasurable spots—the G-Spot, C-Spot (clitoris) and P-Spot (prostate). Where are these spots? What kind of sex toys, lubricants and techniques can we use to help us make them feel good? How can practicing consent lead to greater sexual pleasure? Walk away feeling empowered by new knowledge about how to bring yourself and your partners intentional pleasure in a straight-forward, safe and accessible environment.

Speakers (click to view): Yana Tallon-Hicks

Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-based Sex Education for All

Speakers

Yana Tallon-Hicks

Yana Tallon-Hicks is a sex writer and educator, former CLPP RRASC grant recipient, and a Hampshire graduate. Yana studies Marriage & Family Therapy at Antioch University on her path to becoming a sex therapist. Her sex writing has been published locally and nationally and can be found weekly in her sex column, The V-Spot, in the Valley Advocate. Connect with her at yanatallonhicks.com, and on Instagram @the_vspot.

Groups audience: 

How Do You Bring Feminism to High School?

How do you bring feminism into high school culture, curriculum, and community? This caucus, facilitated by co-leaders of the Northampton High School International Women's Rights Club, will lead a create a space for students, educators, and parents working to bring feminism to their school communities to share visions and strategies. This session is open to people at all levels of experience with activism and social justice issues.

Speakers (click to view): Hannah Crand, Lucien Baskin, Sylvia Venus Shread

How Do You Bring Feminism to High School?

Speakers

Hannah Crand

Hannah Crand is a leader of the International Women's Rights Club at her high school, where she works primarily on educating the student body and changing the climate of my school. As an intersectional club, the International Women's Rights Club frequently collaborate with the GSA, SOCA, and Environmental Club.

Groups audience: 

Lucien Baskin

As a student at Northampton High School, Lucien Baskin has been involved in creating dialogues around issues of social justice within his school community. As a leader of the International Women's Rights Club, he has worked with other student activists to form an annual social justice week, and has sought to make the school curriculum more inclusive of groups that have traditionally been excluded from classes.

Groups audience: 

Sylvia Venus Shread

Sylvia Shread is a 16 year old Northampton High School student who participates in all social justice clubs at her school, including Environmental Club, Students of Color Alliance, Gender Sexuality Alliance, and International Women's Rights Club. She is also a co-leader of IWRC. With the help of other leaders she is organizing Social Justice Week which connects the clubs and works to teach NHS students about intersectionality.

Groups audience: 

How to keep on living when the world wants you dead:building healing&survival strategies for queer&trans women&femmes of color

This is a closed space for queer and trans women and femmes of color to share, collectively heal, and envision futures and communities where our wellness, labor, and existence are uplifted and valued. By prioritizing the presence and experience of sick and disabled femmes, we will explore survival strategies for navigating the impact of systemic oppression on our health and wellness. Participants will leave the session with greater knowledge of how to support and uplift queer and trans women and femmes of color across intersections, within movement/community building, and beyond. This space will cultivate community connections in order to facilitate individual and collective healing through accountability to and compassion for ourselves and each other.

Speakers (click to view): Morgan Robyn Collado, Noreen Khimji

How to keep on living when the world wants you dead:building healing&survival strategies for queer&trans women&femmes of color

Speakers

Morgan Robyn Collado

Morgan Robyn Collado is a fat trans Latina whose writing focuses on leaving a legacy for girls like us. Morgan has published a book of poetry, Make Love to Rage.

Groups audience: 

Noreen Khimji

Noreen Khimji is a disabled queer & trans south asian femme artist, activist, doula, and poet whose work embodies survival as resistance. They are the co-founder of cicada collective, a grassroots abortion doula and volunteer practical support program in North Texas.

Groups audience: 

Learning from the past to make a better future: Five easy things activists can do to save their histories
How did we get started? Was it always like this? Why are we part of this partnership? Have we ever gotten a grant from that organization before? Every day, activists in the field work so hard to make today and tomorrow better that it’s sometimes difficult to pay attention to the past -- or to make sure that we document what we’re doing today. This panel of archivists will discuss how we can all find power from the past and will suggest some easy things we can all do to preserve our stories for the future. You will leave this session equipped with a draft plan for preserving your histories to take back to your organizing work.
Speakers (click to view): Maureen Callahan (She/Her), Jasmine Jones (She/Her), Maggie Schreiner (She/Her)

Learning from the past to make a better future: Five easy things activists can do to save their histories

Speakers

Maureen Callahan (She/Her)

Maureen Callahan is an archivist at the Sophia Smith Collection at Smith College, where she brings in new collections and connects communities with archives. She is committed to memory work as a path to justice, community, self-empowerment and a way to imagine a different future.

Groups audience: 

Jasmine Jones (She/Her)

Jasmine Jones is an archivist at Smith College's Special Collections and works with information systems. Jasmine serves as an advisory archivist on the People’s Archive of Police Violence in Cleveland and as a member of the Inclusivity Committee for the Digital Library Federation Forum. She holds an M.S. in Library Science, Archives Concentration and an M.A. in History from Simmons College.

Groups audience: 

Maggie Schreiner (She/Her)

Maggie Schreiner is an archivist and public historian, working at the intersection of archives, social justice, and community engagement. Maggie is currently a Project Archivist at New York University, and organizes with Interference Archive and Librarians and Archivists with Palestine.

Groups audience: 

Mourning, Healing, and Dreaming In Puerto Rican
In September 2017, Puerto Rico was battered by two historic Category 5 hurricanes—Irma and Maria left most of the island without power, communication capability or clean water, destroyed an estimated 70,000 homes, and damaged about 250,000 more. However, decolonization does not exist for the Puerto Rican. There is no sovereignty that lives here in this colonial United States. We are watching our homeland swallowed by the ocean. The bodies and bones of our ancestors unearthed, floating, trees and roots removed, pollution. This is xenophobia, but that’s not what anyone wants to call it. Yes, we are mourning, and we are healing and our rebuilding our island. Join us as we share and imagine and need each of you to help us dream of a Puerto Rico that survives and lives!
Speakers (click to view): Aimée Thorne-Thomsen, Bianca I Laureano, MA, CSE, Lisbeth M Rivera

Mourning, Healing, and Dreaming In Puerto Rican

Speakers

Aimée Thorne-Thomsen

Aimée Thorne-Thomsen is Vice President for Strategic Partnerships at Advocates for Youth, which champions policies and programs to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. In that capacity, she oversees and coordinates the development, implementation, and evaluation of Advocates’ strategic partnerships with youth activists and colleague organizations, including those in the social and reproductive justice movements.

Groups audience: 

- Private group -

Bianca I Laureano, MA, CSE

Bianca is an award-winning sexologist, curriculum writer, and educator. She is a foundress of the Women of Color Sexual Health Network (WOCSHN), the LatiNegrxs Project, and hosts LatinoSexuality.com. Bianca has published two curricula and provides workshops and trainings on justice for seasoned educators.

Groups audience: 

Lisbeth M Rivera

Lisbeth Meléndez Rivera is a 30+ year veteran of the LGBTQ and labor movements. Lisbeth has extensive experience organizing and training at the intersections of sexual orientation, gender identity, and culture, specifically as they relate to communities of color. Lisbeth has crisscrossed the country training workers and community leaders in organizing, leadership development, and community building strategies from a grassroots perspective. She has also done extensive work supporting LGBTQ leaders in America Latina.

Groups audience: 

Movement Building: Mobilizing the Voices of Black Women

Black women get candidates elected! As a voting bloc, when engaged and informed on the issues that impact them, their families and their communities, Black women mobilize at a greater rate than any of their peers across race, ethnicity, class, and even gender. During our presentation we will highlight what those policy issues are and why they are so meaningful and impactful for Black women. We will then dive into specific strategies and tactics that have been successful in engaging and mobilizing Black women as activists who can lead a movement and use their voting power in support of reproductive justice for all.

Speakers (click to view): Dr. Krystal Redman, Marcela Howell, Nourbese Flint, T. Omi Pennick

Movement Building: Mobilizing the Voices of Black Women

Speakers

Dr. Krystal Redman

Dr. Krystal Redman brings over 10 years of experience in managing low-income and women focused public health access and community-based youth development programs. Previously, Dr. Redman served as the Senior Project Director, Maternal and Child Health, at the Georgia Department of Public Health, where she worked on creating greater healthcare access for women throughout the state of Georgia. Dr. Redman received her Bachelors of Science in Sociology from University of California, Riverside and a Masters of Health Administration from University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and her Doctorates of Public Health from Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California.

Groups audience: 

Marcela Howell

Advocate and policy strategist Marcela Howell is the founder and current Executive Director of In Our Own Voice: National Black Women’s Reproductive Justice Agenda, a non-profit organization devoted to lifting up the voices and leadership of Black women on national and state policy issues. With over 35 years of experience advocating for women’s rights and empowerment, she is recognized for her expertise in strategic communications, leadership development and policy forecasting.

Groups audience: 

Nourbese Flint

Nourbese Flint is a blerd with a background in reproductive justice, journalism, all things X-Men and Batman related, matte lipsticks, Bob's Burgers, and Star Trek. She is currently working at Black Women for Wellness where she directs policy, RJ programs, civic engagement graphics, and keeping markers and crayons organized.

Groups audience: 

T. Omi Pennick

T. Omi Pennick, MPH is currently the Communications and Development Coordinator for SisterLove, Incorporated. She is a graduate of Xavier University of Louisiana and received her Master of Public Health from Tulane University in 2002. In the past, Tiffany has worked in the field of women’s and adolescent reproductive health with various private and non-profit entities including Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, the National Institute of Health, Messages of Empowerment Productions, LLC, Agenda for Children, and HERO for Children. She has helped to design, implement, and disseminate various Evidenced Based Interventions both nationally and internationally in Atlanta, Georgia, St. Marteen, Netherland Antilles, and in Cape Town and Durban, South Africa.

Groups audience: 

No Milk For Your Cookies: A Critical Look at White Allyship in the RJ Movement
More recently, there has been an influx of white-led and white-centered organizations presenting their work as Reproductive Justice; through a variety of leadership networks, national convenings/conferences, and media-based resources, several patterns have been noticed across these organizations. When in community engagement spaces, the erasure of the intellectual and emotional labor of Black women is often paired with information that lacks the racial concentration and cultural competency that the RJ framework requires. Throughout this workshop, the participants will participate in critical thinking, group discussion, small group activities, and interactive media presentations that solidify the importance of Black women, race-specificity, challenging co-opting spaces and organizations, and ally/accomplice-ship as integral parts of the Reproductive Justice movement. This session is Part II of a two-part workshop series and will build upon Part I: "A Seat At The Table: Exploring Disruptive Leadership with a Solange Soundtrack." Join us for one or both sessions!
Speakers (click to view): Alana Belle, Randi Gregory, Kris Keen, Erin Grant

No Milk For Your Cookies: A Critical Look at White Allyship in the RJ Movement

Speakers

Alana Belle

Alana has been involved in various social justice movements for a few years; she has influenced change in regards to local politics, racial justice, economic justice, and most recently, reproductive justice. The current Community Organizer for New Voices for Reproductive Justice - Cleveland, Alana welcomes every opportunity to engage people in the RJ movement.

Groups audience: 

Randi Gregory

Randi has been organizing on electoral, union, and issue based campaigns for the last 8 years. She is dedicated to bringing grassroots organizing and public policy to marginalized communities, specifically LGBTQIA youth of color. She previously worked for SEIU and NARAL Pro Choice Ohio as well as various state Democratic parties as a field director. Currently Randi serves as the Director of Programs for SPARK Reproductive Justice Now, where she is responsible for their field and policy work.

Kris Keen

Over the past 7 years Kris has dedicated their time to various nonprofit arts and culture and issue-based campaigns to support working class youth of color in Philadelphia. For the past two years Kris worked as a youth organizer servicing Black and Brown youth who were pushed out of and disinvested in by traditional public schools of Philadelphia. Kris is now using that experience to influence their work as a community organizer dedicated to developing Black women, fems, and girls in partnership with LGBTQIA organizations to achieve health and wellness through centering a reproductive justice framework.

Groups audience: 

Nuestras Raíces Youth to the Front!
Nuestras Raíces is a grassroots urban agriculture organization based in Holyoke, MA. Our mission is to create healthy environments, celebrate “agri-culture,” harness our collective energy, and advance our vision of a just and sustainable future. Come learn from Holyoke teens who are using food, discussion, and action to make this happen for our schools and our city.
Speakers (click to view):

Nuestras Raíces Youth to the Front!

Speakers
Queer Organizing Down South
This session will uplift the organizing in queer communities in the U.S. South. Activists working with and for queer communities will share their unique experiences of doing this work in this region. What does it mean to do this work in our queer communities? The session will include time for questions from participants, and a brainstorming session on how we can continue these conversations.
Speakers (click to view): Paulina Helm-Hernandez, cortez wright, Oriaku Njoku

Queer Organizing Down South

Speakers

Paulina Helm-Hernandez

Paulina Helm-Hernandez is a queer femme cha-cha girl, artist, trainer, political organizer, strategist & trouble-maker-at-large from Veracrúz, México. This Chicana grew up in rural North Carolina, and is currently growing roots in Atlanta, GA. She has been the Co-Director of Southerners on New Ground (SONG) for 9 years.

Groups audience: 

cortez wright

Cortez Wright is a Black Southern Non Binary Queer Femme feminist, digital organizer, writer, and communications professional with over 5 years of experience working at the intersection of racial justice, queer & trans liberation, and reproductive justice in Georgia and the South. Currently, they are the Digital Communications and Development Coordinator at SPARK Reproductive Justice NOW, where they lead SPARK's digital engagement, social media presence, and communications strategy.

Groups audience: 

Oriaku Njoku

Oriaku Njoku, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast, works at the intersection of meaningful abortion access, queer liberation and reproductive justice. Currently, she ensures funding for families seeking abortion care and advocates for individuals and their chosen families in the Southeast. As a big advocate of self-care, Oriaku uses her time off with the love of her life, her ragamuffin dogs, and cupcakes. Connect with her @oreawku on twitter - all views her own.

Groups audience: 

Radical Reproductive Justice
Reproductive justice is and will continue to be resisted by the right and co-opted by the left. Critics on the right and left often refuse to use the human rights framework in talking about reproductive justice, and some mainstream groups attempt to avoid discussions of white supremacy in the pro-choice movement. Even some women of color attempt similar things and focus on the concepts of intersectionality, rather than the human rights basis of reproductive justice. Some argue that reproductive justice is not appropriate or applicable to white women, people of trans or nonbinary experience, or men. Bring your questions for this roundtable to discuss how to keep reproductive justice radical and revolutionary, and able to fulfill its transformative possibilities.
Speakers (click to view): Loretta J. Ross, Toni M Bond Leonard, Lynn Roberts, PhD

Radical Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Loretta J. Ross

Loretta J. Ross was the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012. She helped create the theory of "Reproductive Justice" in 1994 and led a rape crisis center in the 1970s. She co-authored Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice in 2004, and Reproductive Justice: An Introduction in 2017.

Groups audience: 

Toni M Bond Leonard

Toni Bond Leonard is one of the founding mothers of the reproductive justice movement. Toni is a womanist theo-ethicist whose scholarship focuses on the intersection of religion and reproductive justice. She currently works at Physicians for Reproductive Health as Director of its Partnership for Abortion Provider Safety.

Groups audience: 

Lynn Roberts, PhD

Lynn Roberts is an assistant professor in the Department of Community Health and Social Sciences at the CUNY School of Public Health. Prior to joining CUNY, she oversaw the development, implementation, and evaluation of several prevention programs for women and youth in NYC. Dr. Roberts’ current activism and scholarship examines the intersections of race, class, and gender in adolescent dating relationships, juvenile justice, and reproductive health policies, as well as the impact of models of collaborative inquiry and teaching on civic and political engagement. She is co-editor and contributing author of the anthology Radical Reproductive Justice: Foundation, Theory, Practice, Critique (Feminist Press, 2017).

Groups audience: 

Religious Liberty: It's Not Just For the Christian Right
Religious liberty is a central issue of our time. The Christian Right, (having lost on matters of abortion rights and marriage equality in the courts) is increasingly reframing its agenda in terms of religious liberty -- seeking exemptions from the law by stretching and manipulating the meaning of religious liberty in order to legalize discrimination. This workshop aims to equip organizers, activists, journalists, and academics with a basic knowledge of what religious liberty is and isn't, how the Christian Right is employing the term, and how to we need to respond. This interactive session seeks to provide a framework for building the necessary knowledge and skills to confront this political, intellectual, and theological challenge.
Speakers (click to view): Frederick Clarkson (He/Him), Clare Overlander, Cole Parke (They/Them), Glenn H. Northern (He/Him)

Religious Liberty: It's Not Just For the Christian Right

Speakers

Frederick Clarkson (He/Him)

Frederick Clarkson is Senior Fellow at Political Research Associates. He is surprised that he has been researching and writing about the Religious and Political Right for about 3 decades.

Groups audience: 

Cole Parke (They/Them)

Cole Parke is the LGBTQ & Gender Justice Researcher at Political Research Associates, a social justice think tank based in Boston. PRA is dedicated to supporting organizers and activists on the Left with info and analysis about right-wing opposition to our collective struggle(s) for liberation.

Groups audience: 

Glenn H. Northern (He/Him)

Glenn Northern, domestic program senior associate at Catholics for Choice, builds strategic relationships with prochoice Catholics, policymakers, reproductive health providers, activists and collegial organizations, to promote CFC’s activities and strengthen prochoice advocacy, from a Catholic perspective on the local, state and national levels. Mr. Northern uses his extensive experience in public policy, training and technical assistance to help CFC inform and influence debates on sexual and reproductive rights and health, social justice and religious liberty.

Groups audience: 

Reproductive Justice in Indigenous Communities
Panelists will share their strategies and experiences working within indigenous communities on issues of reproductive health, rights, and justice. Topics explored will include current legislative attacks on indigenous communities, intersections of environmental and reproductive justice, native motherhood and parenting in academia, and two-spirit identity. Participants will leave with a grounding of reproductive justice tactics within indigenous communities.
Speakers (click to view): Ashley Nicole McCray, Beata Tsosie-Peña, Coya White Hat-Artichoker

Reproductive Justice in Indigenous Communities

Speakers

Ashley Nicole McCray

Ashley is a proud Oglala Lakota (Bad Face Band), Sicangu Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, & Absentee Shawnee (Horse(Deer) Clan - Healer division) woman. She is a single mother of 3, a graduate student at the University of Oklahoma where she founded Indigenize OU, and a community organizer fighting for restorative justice for indigenous peoples through decolonization and reindigenization. She was recognized by the White House as a 2015 WHO Champion of Change for Young Women Empowering Communities for her efforts toward diversity & inclusion on campus, the recipient of the Norman Human Rights Commission's 2015 Norman Human Rights Award for her efforts in indigenous justice, and a CoreAlign Speaking Race to Power fellow.

Groups audience: 

Beata Tsosie-Peña

Beata Tsosie-Peña is an educator and poet from Santa Clara Pueblo. The realities of living next to a nuclear weapons complex has called her into environmental health and justice work with the local non-profit organization, Tewa Women United. She believes in the practice and preservation of land-based knowledge, spirituality, language, seeds, and family. Her intentions are for healing, wellness and sustainability for future generations.

Groups audience: 

Coya White Hat-Artichoker

Coya was born and raised on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota; she is a proud enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Coya has been doing activist work in various communities and movements since the age of 15

Groups audience: 

Revolutionary Mothering: Love By Any Means Necessary
Inspired by the legacy of radical and queer black feminists of the 1970s and ’80s, Revolutionary Mothering places marginalized mothers of color at the center of a world of necessary transformation. The challenges we face as movements working for racial, economic, reproductive, gender, and food justice, as well as anti-violence, anti-imperialist, and queer liberation are the same challenges that many mothers face every day. Mothers from marginalized backgrounds create a generous space for life in the face of oppression and activate a powerful vision of the future while navigating the tangible concerns of the present. Join us for a timely discussion of movement shifting committed to birthing new worlds.
Speakers (click to view): China Martens (She/Her), Mai'a Williams (She/Her), T.K. Tunchez (She/Her)

Revolutionary Mothering: Love By Any Means Necessary

Speakers

China Martens (She/Her)

China Martens is a Baltimore writer and single mother of a 29-year-old. She is the author of “The Future Generation: The Zine-Book for Subculture Parents, Kids, Friends and Others” and the co-editor of "Don't Leave Your Friends Behind: Concrete Ways To Support Families In Social Justice Movements & Communities" and "Revolutionary Mothering: Love On The Front Lines."

Groups audience: 

Mai'a Williams (She/Her)

Mai’a Williams is a writer, editor, and visual and performance artist. It was her living and working with Egyptian, Palestinian, Congolese, and Central American indigenous mothers in resistance communities that inspired her life-giving work, radical mothering. She is author of two books of poetry, No God but Ghosts and Monsters and Other Silent Creatures and co-editor of the anthology, Revolutionary Mothering: Love on the Front Lines.

Groups audience: 

T.K. Tunchez (She/Her)

T.K. Tunchez is a full-time, multi-media working artist, market organizer, and stone worker. Her main spiritual and artistic discipline is currently focused on creating healing wearable art pieces that incorporate stone allies through her business, Las Ofrendas. She is a budding birth attendant, a mama of two amazing young people, and organizes markets that use alternative economic models to support women and community organizations.

Groups audience: 

Say Her Name: Shifting Strategies in Movements for Police Accountability and Reproductive Justice

Numerous Black women have been killed by or after encounters with police, yet Black women have been erased from the national conversation on police killings. How is state violence experienced by Black women, girls, and gender nonconforming people in ways that are similar and different to other members of our communities? How do individual incidents reflect long standing patterns of gender and sexuality-specific policing and criminalization of race, poverty and place? What is the role of law enforcement in regulating racially gendered bodies and sexualities in the carceral state? How does bringing Black women's experiences to the center of the current discourse around racial profiling, police violence, mass incarceration expand our understanding of the issues and shift our strategies and demands? Join us for a collective conversation, skill share, and strategy session around these questions and more!

Speakers (click to view): Andrea Ritchie

Say Her Name: Shifting Strategies in Movements for Police Accountability and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Andrea Ritchie

Andrea Ritchie is a Black lesbian attorney and organizer whose work has focused on profiling, policing and police violence, and criminalization of women and LGBTQ people of color over the past two and a half decades. She is a Senior Soros Justice Fellow, co-author of Say Her Name, A Roadmap for Change, Queer (In)Justice and Law Enforcement Violence Against Women and Transgender People of Color: An Organizer's Toolkit.

Groups audience: 

Social Workers for Reproductive Justice
While some social workers are limited by employment and government policies in discussing reproductive health services, other social workers are limited in their own professional knowledge or by their discomfort in discussing reproductive and sexual health with clients, communities, and organizations. In response to the growing acceptance of the Reproductive Justice framework, Social Workers for Reproductive Justice (SWRJ) was formed to educate professional social workers and students on the Reproductive Justice framework. We need to integrate an intersectional and reproductive justice analysis in our profession and to promote client self-determination in reproductive health care options. Come to network with professional social workers and students, hear SWRJ’s exciting plans, and talk about how social workers are using reproductive justice in our profession!
Speakers (click to view): Nicole Clark M.S.W. (She/Her), Louisa Thanhauser (She/Her), Susan Yanow M.S.W. (She/Her)

Social Workers for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Nicole Clark M.S.W. (She/Her)

Nicole Clark is a licensed social worker, independent consultant and Reproductive Justice activist who uses the RJ framework with nonprofits, government agencies, and community groups to design, implement, and evaluate programs, services and campaign that raises the voices and lived experiences of women and girls of color. Nicole is based in Brooklyn, New York.

Groups audience: 

Louisa Thanhauser (She/Her)

Louisa Thanhauser earned her MSW with a concentration in social and economic development and a specialization in policy. She has a background in state-level reproductive health policy and is currently the State Policy Associate at the National Abortion Federation, the professional organization of abortion providers, where her policy and advocacy work is informed by macro-level social work and reproductive justice perspectives.

Groups audience: 

Susan Yanow M.S.W. (She/Her)

A long-time reproductive rights activist, Susan Yanow works to expand access to abortion domestically and internationally. She is a co-founder of Women Help Women, an international organization that provides abortion and contraception services and supports women who are self-managing their abortions, and also works with a number of domestic projects that focus on expanding access to abortion.

Groups audience: 

Southern Organizing Strategy Session
Southerners, let's leverage our collective power and expertise and get organized across borders! In this strategy session, we will work together to create a map that identifies each person’s areas of expertise, and growth areas to find the ways we can work together and level up our knowledge and skills. We will also learn about what everyone is working on both within and outside of their organizations and build connections based on how folks want to grow their work. You will walk away with next steps to work with someone else doing RJ work in the South, and a growing support system.
Speakers (click to view): Marlo Barrera, Oriaku Njoku

Southern Organizing Strategy Session

Speakers

Marlo Barrera

Marlo is a founding member of ReJAC, which recently launched the Plan B NOLA text and healthline. Plan B NOLA distributes free and by-donation emergency contraception through a city-wide network of Community Support Members and Community Outposts. She is a New Orleans native interested in building more and stronger organizing relationships and support systems across the south.

Groups audience: 

Oriaku Njoku

Oriaku Njoku, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast, works at the intersection of meaningful abortion access, queer liberation and reproductive justice. Currently, she ensures funding for families seeking abortion care and advocates for individuals and their chosen families in the Southeast. As a big advocate of self-care, Oriaku uses her time off with the love of her life, her ragamuffin dogs, and cupcakes. Connect with her @oreawku on twitter - all views her own.

Groups audience: 

Taking Control of Our Reproductive Health — Self Managed Abortion, Safe and Supported
We must become informed about technologies that impact our reproductive lives, and build strategies to put these technologies into our own hands. In this workshop, participants will learn about how abortion pills work, and how they are used safely with and without medical supervision. We will discuss legal issues and how to mitigate legal risk for those using abortion pills outside of the medical system. We will also talk about how self managed abortion is an empowerment strategy which incorporates the core principles of reproductive justice. Resources for continuing education on these issues will be distributed. As a group, we will brainstorm innovative strategies for spreading information to vulnerable communities, learning from models used in other countries.
Speakers (click to view): Susan Yanow, MSW, Marlene Gerber Fried

Taking Control of Our Reproductive Health — Self Managed Abortion, Safe and Supported

Speakers

Susan Yanow, MSW

Susan Yanow works to expand access to abortion domestically and internationally. She is a cofounder of Women Help Women, an international organization that provides medication abortion services, and EASE (Expanding Abortion Services in the South). Susan coordinates the Later Abortion Initiative at Ibis Reproductive Health. She serves on the Boards of the ACLU of Massachusetts, Nurses for Sexual & Reproductive Health, and Social Workers for Reproductive Justice.

Groups audience: 

Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a scholar and long-time advocate for abortion access and reproductive justice. She is Professor of Philosophy at Hampshire College and Faculty Director of CLPP. She serves on the board of the Abortion Rights Fund of Western MA and Our Bodies Ourselves, is a consultant to Women Help Women, and is currently a Global Scholar at the O’Neill Institute at Georgetown Law School.

Groups audience: 

Taking Up Space: From Teens’ Experience
The main objective of this workshop is to explore what it means to take up space and becoming more comfortable with expressing your ideas, your needs, and your feelings. This workshop aims to give youth and adults alike a new perspective on respecting others’ voices and advocating for others. We will grow our definition of what taking up space means and analyzing how this definition of taking up space fits into our lives currently and ways we’d like to change it moving forward. This workshop is led through the lens of student activists navigating adult-oriented activist spaces and learning how to amplify our voices. Thus we’re asking for any self-identified adults to take a step back in this space and listen to what the youth have to say.
Speakers (click to view): Bebe Leistyna, Willa Sippel, Cherilyn Strader, Zoe Lemos

Taking Up Space: From Teens’ Experience

Speakers

Bebe Leistyna

Bebe is a full time high school student and finds joy doing justice work. Bebe became interested in social justice due to the powerful work of the Movement for Black Lives and especially Black Lives Matter. Bebe is excited to work with other young people to create change and is looking forward to finding a way to to use art as protest.

Groups audience: 

Willa Sippel

Willa Sippel is a student, activist, and passionate feminist from Western Mass. She is co-president of Northampton High School's Feminist Collective, and a member of the Student Union. She is also involved with the area's arts and activism scene. This past February she played with her band at the Northampton Women's March. And she couldn't be more honored and excited to be here at CLPP!

Groups audience: 

Cherilyn Strader

Cherilyn is a full time student and full time activist whose interest in social and political activism peaked during the 2016 election when people’s rights and safety came under threat. She currently works as an intern at Represent.Us and as the co-chair of her school's chapter of the Massachusetts High School Democrats. She aims to empower high schoolers' voices and hopes to continue advocating for youth and other underrepresented voices in her lifetime.

Groups audience: 

The Abortion Provider Training Challenge: The State of Abortion Training Today

Most people don't know that only 6% of family medicine residency programs and only half of OB/GYN residency programs provide training in abortion care. It is also not widely known that state-by-state restrictions prevent physician's assistants and nurses from receiving training in abortion care. Some clinics have to fly in providers due to the shortage of abortion providers that this lack of training has created. In this workshop we will discuss the current training environment and strategies for change used around the country. We will meet in breakout groups to further delve into training and strategizing for change.

Speakers (click to view): Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre, Stephanie Blaufarb, Laura Riker

The Abortion Provider Training Challenge: The State of Abortion Training Today

Speakers

Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre

Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre works as a Research Associate at the Reproductive Health Access Project where she manages research studies about abortion, contraception, and miscarriage care. GG is also pursuing a Doctor of Public Health degree at the CUNY Graduate Center.

Groups audience: 

Stephanie Blaufarb

Stephanie Blaufarb became passionate about reproductive health during her Peace Corps service where she worked as a community health organizer for adolescent and women's health. Stephanie earned a BA/BS in international affairs from Northeastern University and an MPH from the CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter College. Her focus at the Reproductive Health Access Project has been communications, patient decision aids, and provider training in reproductive health.

Groups audience: 

Laura Riker

A background in Women’s Studies and abortion advocacy led Laura Riker to grad school, where she interned at a community health center and became interested in the clinical side of reproductive rights. At RHAP, she organizes primary care clinicians from across the country to work together to expand access to comprehensive reproductive health care. Laura holds a Masters of Social Work from Columbia University.

Groups audience: 

The War Against Immigrants: Immigration Justice In Dangerous Times
Immigrant communities, including undocumented immigrants, communities of color, Muslims, and those identifying as LGBTQ, face a dangerous social and political climate. Racist policies and rhetoric have been emboldened by the new Administration that ran its electoral campaign on a racist and xenophobic anti-immigrant platform, that it is now being rapidly enacted. In this session, activists on the frontlines will discuss the realities of scapegoating, criminalization, detention and deportation, and share strategies for political intervention and advocacy for immigrant communities.
Speakers (click to view): Thanu Yakupitiyage (She/Her), Mohini Lal (She/Her), Margie Del Castillo

The War Against Immigrants: Immigration Justice In Dangerous Times

Speakers

Thanu Yakupitiyage (She/Her)

Thanu Yakupitiyage is a long-time immigrant rights activist, media professional, and cultural organizer based in New York City. She worked for the New York Immigration Coalition for close to seven years where she headed the organization's communications and media relations strategy. Through her work at NYIC, she became an immigration policy expert, using her skills in media and communications to shift narratives on immigration and immigrants themselves. She was a lead organizer in recent efforts to push back against Trump's executive orders in his first week in office that mandated a Muslim Ban and increased enforcement and raids against immigrant communities. Most recently, she has taken on the role of managing U.S Communications for 350.org and bringing a migration perspective to the critical work of climate justice. Thanu has an MA in communications from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and a BA in critical media studies and international development from Hampshire College.

Groups audience: 

Mohini Lal (She/Her)

Mohini Lal is the If/When/How Reproductive Justice Fellow at the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum (NAPAWF). She is a first-generation immigrant from Texas. Mohini graduated from Chicago-Kent College of Law with a J.D. and certificates in Public Interest and Praxis Law. Mohini is committed to creating and implementing policies that provide culturally competent legal and social services.

Groups audience: 

Transforming Reproductive Justice: Trans Health Care Access
Trans, gender nonconforming, and non-binary people often have to play the role of their own health care experts and advocates. From misgendering to gatekeeping, to ignoring our reproductive needs, to making dangerous assumptions, health care providers and insurance companies can sometimes do more to harm than help. Factors like racism, transmisogyny, classism, and ableism make accessing health care more difficult for people already experiencing transphobia. Join this panel of activists making critical interventions in the landscape of health care access for trans people across the spectrum!
Speakers (click to view): Renae Taylor, Cecilia Maria Gentili, Kaleb Oliver Dornheim, Quita Tinsley

Transforming Reproductive Justice: Trans Health Care Access

Speakers

Renae Taylor

Renae Taylor is a 43 year old Non-Binary Trans person located in Memphis, TN. Renae is involved in many social and racial justice organizations. Renae is also a member of their local HIV Care and Prevention Planning Group.

Groups audience: 

Cecilia Maria Gentili

Ms. Gentili currently serves as the Director of Policy and Public Affairs at GMHC, the world’s first and leading provider of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy. Originally from Argentina, Ms. Gentili started working as an intern at the LGBT Center in New York City, where she found her passion for advocacy and services. She went on to run the Transgender Health Program at Apicha CHC from 2012 to 2016. She is also a contributor to Trans Bodies, Trans Selves: A Resource for the Transgender Community, and is a collaborator with Translatina Network.

Groups audience: 

Kaleb Oliver Dornheim

Kaleb Dornheim is 25, poor, trans/nonbinary, queer, mentally ill, Baltimore and Hudson Valley grounded, has their Masters in Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies concentrating in Trans Studies Education, and works at GMHC as a Sexual and Reproductive Advocate for TGNC folks. When they aren't working or doing activism, they like being around farm animals, plants, and engaging in Kardashian Discourse.

Groups audience: 

Quita Tinsley

Quita Tinsley is a fat, Black, queer femme that writes, organizes, and works to build sustainable change in their home, the South. They currently serve as the Deputy Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast; and they're an alum of Echoing Ida, a Black women and non-binary folks' writing collective of Forward Together.

Groups audience: 

Trials and Triumph of Being Radical from the Inside Out

Hear directly from currently incarcerated individuals and build strategy and support with formerly incarcerated Justice Now activists in this interactive session. Presenters will share their vision of abolition and inspiring resilience through stories of the trials and triumphs of being radical from the inside out. Join us as we dream beyond prison walls to build a future free of prisons and state violence where families are whole and communities are supported.

 

Speakers (click to view): Mianta McKnight, Misty Rojo

Trials and Triumph of Being Radical from the Inside Out

Speakers

Mianta McKnight

Mianta McKnight is a formerly incarcerated juvenile offender tried as an adult who is passionate about incarcerated women. She knows firsthand what the prion experience is like since she served 18 years & 1 day on a 15 year to life sentence and essentially grew up within the prison industrial complex. As a fellow for Justice Now and activist for social change, she is dedicated to challenging inhumane conditions and being a voice for those who are unable to speak for themselves. She attends SFSU and is majoring in dance, which she plans to use to work along with holistic medicine to promote longevity, self-awareness, and self-care.

Groups audience: 

Misty Rojo

Misty Rojo is part of a collective leadership structure at Justice Now, where she is the first co-director that has lived experience with incarceration. In the 3 years that Misty has come on board, she worked to helped the push to get SB 1135 passed to protect against coercive sterilizations in California women's prisons in 2014. In 2015, after 3 years of campaigning, she got a bill passed to expand access to an alternative custody program. Misty is a hardcore abolitionist believing all aspects of the criminal justice system and PIC need to be dismantled.

Groups audience: 

We Are FAT Not Invisible
Join us for a conversation about how reproductive health, rights, and justice movements impact and interact with Fat bodies of color. This is an intentional space to for Fat folks to be prioritized and brainstorm strategies reclaim a movement that often erases us. Topics include access to healthcare, love, and visibility. This is a closed space for Fat People Of Color (size 16 and up).
Speakers (click to view): Guadalupe Ambrosio, Monserrat Ambrosio

We Are FAT Not Invisible

Speakers

Guadalupe Ambrosio

Guadalupe Ambrosio is co-director at the New York State Youth Leadership Council, the first undocumented youth-led organization in the state. She is dedicated to youth leadership and believes that it is important to center their experience and ideas in order to create lasting change. She started her work in body positivity in 2011 and has been a lead advocate in New York City since doing workshops to young girls of color about FAT Acceptance.

Groups audience: 

Monserrat Ambrosio

My name is Monserrat Ambrosio, a 16 year old high school student who happens to be fat. My size has often impacted my interactions with doctors, clothes, and with myself. My goal is to create space for us to exist peacefully.

Groups audience: 

Working at the Intersection of Religion, Spirituality and Reproductive Justice
For many of us, our activist work is guided by our religious or spiritual beliefs. At the same time, many of us work with, provide services to, and advocate on behalf of individuals who come from diverse religious traditions. Join panelists from from diverse religious traditions as we discuss connecting our religious and spiritual lives and working for reproductive justice, abortion rights, and LGBTQ justice, and talk about how we bring those views back to our home communities while respecting others' beliefs. Participants will gain an understanding of why collaborative partnerships with faith communities can be important in this work, how religious leaders are currently engaging with the movement, and learn about examples of successful religious/secular partnerships from progressive movements.
Speakers (click to view): Willie J. Parker, Rev. Jason Lydon, Toni M. Bond Leonard, Annie Krol, Sina Sam

Working at the Intersection of Religion, Spirituality and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Willie J. Parker

Dr. Willie Parker is an advocate of reproductive, social, racial, and gender justice who seeks to model healthy, inclusive, non-patriarchal masculinity while working for change.

Groups audience: 

Rev. Jason Lydon

Rev. Jason M. Lydon is a Unitarian Universalist community minister and the National Director of Black and Pink, an open family of LGBTQ prisoners and 'free world' allies who support each other.

Groups audience: 

Toni M. Bond Leonard

One of the founding RJ mothers, Toni Bond Leonard has been an advocate for reproductive health, rights and justice since 1990. A scholar, Toni's current scope of work focuses on creating theologies of RJ and the ethics of reproduction.

Groups audience: 

Annie Krol

Annie Krol is a queer Jewish convert who grew up east of Cleveland, Ohio, and returned in 2014 to work as NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio's Northern organizer. Annie has served as a doula and advocate for the Buffalo refugee community and is also employed as a freelance political puppeteer, stilt artist, and street performer. She is extremely extroverted and works enthusiastically with hundreds of volunteers in five cities.

Groups audience: 

Sina Sam

Sina Sam is a Khmer American community organizer from Washington State. With intersectional education in Women's Studies and Public Policy, her advocacy work centers around violence prevention, reproductive health and SE Asian community needs. She is an experienced facilitator, lobbying for policies that benefit communities of color, orientation, immigration status and poverty. Passionate about intersectional justice, she is dedicated to strengthening and healing all our communities.

Groups audience: 

Your Pleasure Toolkit: Rituals and Practices for the Movement
Our movements often center the violence our communities face. How can we hold onto the pleasure while navigating hostility? What shifts when we begin to center and celebrate pleasure? Our liberation depends on seeing our bodies as more than sites of harm, and pleasure rituals can help us with practicing our freedom. How can we ignite our pleasurable selves as we navigate hostile environments? What role does pleasure play in reproductive freedom? How can we get free while staying centered in our joy? How can pleasure and joy lead to freedom? This hands-on, interactive workshop will feature performance, community altar building, and toolkit building for activists wanting to invite pleasure into their lives and work. Participants will walk away with a number of concrete, specific examples and practices to incorporate into their lives, relationships, and organizations.
Speakers (click to view): Taja Lindley, Charmaine Lang

Your Pleasure Toolkit: Rituals and Practices for the Movement

Speakers

Taja Lindley

Taja Lindley is an artist based in Brooklyn. She is the founder of Colored Girls Hustle, and a member of Echoing Ida and Harriet's Apothecary. // ColoredGirlsHustle.com // TajaLindley.com

Groups audience: 

Charmaine Lang

Charmaine spends her time Chicago style steppin’ in Milwaukee, daydreaming about what it would be like to have an Ooloi in her life and writing her dissertation. She is a fellow of Echoing Ida where she explores the intersections of class, wellness, and pleasure amongst Black women, and connects it to the long tradition of Black women’s activism.

Groups audience: 

Youth in Feminism: What It Means To Be Young and Passionate, AND How You Can Support Us
This session will be teen-feminist led, talking about what it means to be young feminists in 2017 who fearlessly work towards reproductive justice (even when our communities aren't supportive). We are both supported and thwarted by non-feminists and "veteran" feminists alike. Calling young feminists! Let's talk about what we are doing when no one is looking. Calling youth advocates! Come learn from us. Together, we will openly discuss how we can motivate and take action for an intergenerational, feminist future.
Speakers (click to view): Vanessa Flores (She/Her)

Youth in Feminism: What It Means To Be Young and Passionate, AND How You Can Support Us

Speakers

Vanessa Flores (She/Her)

Vanessa Flores is a 17 year old Mexican-American high school senior from East Harlem, New York City. She is part of East Harlem Tutorial Program. Through this program she has done work in media studies such as EHT-TV and Tribeca Teaches where she promoted issues currently facing her community.

Groups audience: 

Saturday Session 3: 5:15PM - 6:45PM

#FlipTheScript: Centering Adoptee Voices Within Reproductive Justice

Within reproductive justice movement spaces, conversations about adoption are often centered on the rights of potential adoptive parents, especially LGBTQ people & same-sex couples, single people, disabled people, and/or people of color. Where are the adult adoptees in these discussions? How has the language of "equality" been appropriated to promote an agenda that excludes adoptees' voices and the social conditions that lead to transnational adoption? What are the ways in which adoptees' rights to connect to their first and birth families are ignored when we are not included? Join two queer Korean adoptees for a discussion at the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality to complicate and critique current narratives about adoption, rights, equality, and justice.

Speakers (click to view): Joy Messinger, Yong Chan Miller

#FlipTheScript: Centering Adoptee Voices Within Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Joy Messinger

Joy Messinger is a passionate community advocate whose life and career is guided by a commitment to social and reproductive justice. Currently calling Chicago home, she has also lived and worked in Central North Carolina and Western New York. Joy is Third Wave Fund's Program Officer and also devotes time to local and national feminist, adoptee justice, Asian American, and LGBTQ community building.

Groups audience: 

Yong Chan Miller

Yong Chan Miller lives in Oakland, CA, and is the executive director of Surge. She has worked in social justice movements for over 20 years primarily at the intersections of race, class, and gender.

Groups audience: 

#NoBanNoWallNoRaids: Arm Yourself with Information for the Frontlines
Have you ever found yourself in a well-meaning political conversation that takes a sudden turn toward the xenophobic? “I’m all for human rights but immigrants are [choose an inaccurate and dangerous stereotype to insert here: stealing our jobs, draining public funds, causing terrorism, etc.].” Come hear from panelists who are from and/or work with immigrant Muslim communities, Latinx communities, AAPI communities, and refugee communities. We will deconstruct myths about immigration and immigrants so that you can go back to your community to advocate for sanctuary status, to explain why it IS a Muslim ban, to protect our moral obligation to resettle refugees, and to articulate how a Wall hurts us all.
Speakers (click to view): Abby Jo Krobot (She/Her), Jeff Napolitano (He/Him), Margie Del Castillo, Sahar Pirzada (She/Her), Miriam Yeung (She/Her)

#NoBanNoWallNoRaids: Arm Yourself with Information for the Frontlines

Speakers

Abby Jo Krobot (She/Her)

Abby Jo Krobot is a Former Refugee AmeriCorps Member at JFSWM. Her duties included being a non-bilingual interpreter, a community advocate, and an ESOL teacher. She is a graduate of Bay Path University.

Groups audience: 

Jeff Napolitano (He/Him)

Jeff Napolitano has been the director of the Western Massachusetts program of AFSC for over 8 years, working on issues ranging from antiwar organizing to civil disobedience trainings to sanctuary cities.

Groups audience: 

Sahar Pirzada (She/Her)

Sahar Pirzada is a graduate student with the University of Southern California Masters of Social Work program. She is the Programs and Outreach Manager for HEART Women & Girls and is passionate about creating safe spaces for Muslim survivors of sexual violence.

Groups audience: 

Miriam Yeung (She/Her)

Miriam Yeung is a proud, queer, AAPI, immigrant, woman activist from Brooklyn, NY who is raising her two daughters to be daring. She's spent most of her time at the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum and the NYC Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center working on reproductive justice, racial justice, economic justice, immigrant rights, and LGBTI liberation. @miriamyeung

Groups audience: 

Appropriate Whiteness
During this workshop, participants will learn how to have difficult conversations about white privilege and white supremacy with the people they love, including families, friends, and co-workers. We'll discuss how to be a "credit to your race" in becoming an abolitionist against racism in the reproductive rights movement, how to actively listen and ask questions of people of color with respect, and how to avoid denial, racial triggers, and marginalization.
Speakers (click to view): Loretta J. Ross (She/Her)

Appropriate Whiteness

Speakers

Loretta J. Ross (She/Her)

Loretta J. Ross was the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012. She helped create the theory of "Reproductive Justice" in 1994 and led a rape crisis center in the 1970s. She co-authored Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice in 2004, and Reproductive Justice: An Introduction in 2017.

Groups audience: 

Beyond Inclusivity: Understanding Trans Identities
By focusing on activists in the reproductive justice movement and professionals in the healthcare industry, this workshop will give people without trans experience the language and tools you need to support transgender and individuals personally and professionally. Even when we know support is important, it can be hard to know exactly how our support is needed. Participants will walk away with a deep and broad understanding of struggles people of trans experience may face in their day-to-day lives, as well as in the medical industry and reproductive justice spheres. You will also leave with language and hands-on, realistic, real world strategies for addressing these issues. We will dismantle the gender binary, practice pronoun usage, discuss etiquette surrounding trans identities, and brainstorm strategies for disrupting transphobia.
Speakers (click to view): Emmett DuPont (They/Them)

Beyond Inclusivity: Understanding Trans Identities

Speakers

Emmett DuPont (They/Them)

Emmett DuPont (they/them) is an undergraduate at Hampshire College and lifelong unschooler. Emmett's previous work includes interning at CLPP as well as with local sex educator Yana Tallon-Hicks. They also work closely with COLAGE, the nation's largest organization for queerspawn (children of LGBTQ+ parents), where they facilitate programming teaching queerspawn about everything from self-expression to trans identities.

Groups audience: 

Blood, Memories and other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice

This session is intended for Brown, Indigenous, Black, Asian, Pacific Islander, and other people of color. Memories are carried between generations in many different ways. Many of us, cultural workers, full spectrum birth workers and reproductive justice organizers of color understand the importance to (re)learn and (re)member traditional medicine as we work towards body literacy, autonomy and freedom. Menstruation can be a tool to better understand our bodies, track natural cycles, control fertility and also learn about cultural and familial traditions around menstruation. In this gathering we will talk about the importance of cultural preservation and menstrual education in reproductive justice, and sharing knowledge and experiences around holistic menstrual care.

Speakers (click to view): La Loba Loca

Blood, Memories and other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice

Speakers

La Loba Loca

La Loba Loca is a Queer sudaca, radical health educator, seed-saver, yerbetera, gardener, companion (doula), student-midwife, molestosa, malhablada, tatooadora, and choliperri. She is invested in learning and disseminating information, knowledge and resources with the hope that self-knowledge and (re)cognition of abuelita knowledge will create a future where we can depend on ourselves and communities. Connect with her at lalobaloca.com, on Instagram @lalobalocashares, and on facebook.com/lalobaloca.

Groups audience: 

Creating Space for People with Disabilities in Reproductive Justice
This identity caucus will center the experiences of activists with disabilities (visible and invisible), chronic pain, etc. in order to host an unapologetic discussion of what the reproductive justice movement needs to include us. The facilitators, who will join us in person and remotely via skype, will lead us in a deep discussion of how reproductive justice organizers can facilitate accessible spaces and how we need to change our conversations about sex education, sexuality, and sexual stigma. We will also look at the way the anti-choice movement has co-opted narratives of disability to push their regressive and harmful agenda. This session is queer-affirming, welcoming activists of all genders, presentations, and sexualities. There will be an ASL interpreter and any materials that are provided will have large-print versions with image descriptions. People without disabilities are invited to attend, listen and learn.
Speakers (click to view): Katie O'Connell (She/Her), Alice Wong (She/Her), Katie Klabusich (She/Her), LaSharn Maelee

Creating Space for People with Disabilities in Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Katie O'Connell (She/Her)

Katie O'Connell is a queer disabled femme who is committed to radical and intersectional organizing that amplifies the voices of folks who are marginalized in social justice movements. She has worked at the NAF Hotline Fund, Planned Parenthood, and Reproaction.

Groups audience: 

Alice Wong (She/Her)

Alice Wong is a sociologist, research consultant, and disability activist based in San Francisco, CA. Her areas of interest are accessible healthcare for people with disabilities, Medicaid policies, storytelling, and social media. She is the Founder and Project Coordinator for the Disability Visibility Project (DVP), a community partnership with StoryCorps and an online community dedicated to recording, amplifying, and sharing disability stories and culture.

Groups audience: 

Katie Klabusich (She/Her)

Katie Klabusich is a writer, radio host, and social justice activist whose work often focuses on sexuality, reproductive health, mental health, disability, and poverty.

Groups audience: 

Creative Resistance: Self and Community Empowerment through Theatre
Research now shows that art can play a role in unwinding the trauma (personal and historical) that is written into our DNA. Come learn about the research surrounding trauma's impact on the brain and body and explore how to use art in the healing process. After building a theoretical foundation, participants will be guided through individual and group theatre games that explore personal relations to trauma, power, and love. As a group, we will build a "creative self-care plan" that will provide practical ways you can build the arts into your daily life to continue unwinding trauma.
Speakers (click to view): Shawn Reilly (They/Them or Ze/Zir)

Creative Resistance: Self and Community Empowerment through Theatre

Speakers

Shawn Reilly (They/Them or Ze/Zir)

Shawn Reilly is in their final year at Vanderbilt University, where they study Human and Organizational Development, with a focus in education and social justice. While there, they have led a successful campaign to gain gender inclusive housing, and is currently organizing for living wages for union workers. Outside of school, Reilly's work centers around healing arts, education justice, labor organizing, and youth development.

Groups audience: 

Embodied Intersections: A Disability Justice Journey
How do we embody our own struggles for justice? Where do our identities end, and our work begins? Join activist and core Disability Justice Collective member Gykyira Shoy as she introduces a disability justice framework through her own story as a trans woman with a disability. Participants will be introduced to a multi-issue disability justice platform and have a chance to pose questions.
Speakers (click to view): Gykyira Shoy

Embodied Intersections: A Disability Justice Journey

Speakers

Gykyira Shoy

Gykyira is 32 year old transwoman who has been fighting as an activist for 17 years. She graduated at the top of her class from Trans Justice Community School and is a core member of the Disability Justice Collective. She is the president and CEO of Trans Liberation United.

Groups audience: 

Empowerment through Direct Care: Organizing to Provide Abortions and Support Across the Spectrum of Pregnancy
Join members of the Doula Project and the Jane Collective to share stories about organizing and creating community; learning to provide abortions and doula support during pregnancy, miscarriages and abortions; and political work that upholds individual experiences and the need for respectful and compassionate healthcare for all.
Speakers (click to view): Lani Blechman, Laura Kaplan, Lauren Mitchell, Mary Mahoney

Empowerment through Direct Care: Organizing to Provide Abortions and Support Across the Spectrum of Pregnancy

Speakers

Lani Blechman

Lani Blechman is currently a Western Massachusetts elementary school librarian and social justice facilitator, commonly focusing on white privilege and gender diversity. Often, her worlds collide. Lani is formerly a CLPP conference coordinator and always excited to come home.

Groups audience: 

Laura Kaplan

Laura Kaplan is the author of The Story of Jane: The Legendary Underground Feminist Abortion Service and was a member of Jane. A lifelong activist, she was a lay midwife, an advocate for battered women and an advocate for nursing home residents. She has worked on public policy for consumers covered by managed care plans and served on the board of NWHN.

Groups audience: 

Lauren Mitchell

Lauren Mitchell is one of the founders of The Doula Project, and part of the leadership team of Trans Buddy. She is also co-author of the upcoming book, The Doulas!: Radical Care for Pregnant People. It is her honor to have served over a thousand clients and have trained hundreds of activists, students, and clinicians over the past ten years.

Groups audience: 

Mary Mahoney

Mary Mahoney, LMSW, is the Founder and Board Co-Chair of The Doula Project. She is co-author of THE DOULAS! Radical Care for Pregnant People, forthcoming Fall 2016 from The Feminist Press.

Groups audience: 

Engaging Religious Communities in the Fight for Justice
How do we bring our whole selves into our activist work? How do we mobilize our faith communities to join the fight for justice? Join panelists from diverse religious traditions as we discuss connecting our religious and spiritual lives with our work for reproductive, racial, and economic justice. Participants will gain an understanding of why collaborative partnerships with faith communities can be important in this work, how religious leaders are currently engaging with the movement, and learn about examples of successful religious/secular partnerships from progressive movements.
Speakers (click to view): Toni M Bond Leonard, Elaina Ramsey, Sadia Arshad, Lisbeth M Rivera

Engaging Religious Communities in the Fight for Justice

Speakers

Toni M Bond Leonard

Toni Bond Leonard is one of the founding mothers of the reproductive justice movement. Toni is a womanist theo-ethicist whose scholarship focuses on the intersection of religion and reproductive justice. She currently works at Physicians for Reproductive Health as Director of its Partnership for Abortion Provider Safety.

Groups audience: 

Elaina Ramsey

Elaina serves as the Executive Director of the Ohio Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. With a decade of campaign, advocacy, grassroots organizing, and communications experience at the intersections of faith and politics, Elaina has worked for various nonprofits and campaigns, including Sojourners, Women’s Action for New Directions, and Obama for America. She holds master's degrees in both Theological Studies and International Peace & Conflict Resolution.

Groups audience: 

Sadia Arshad

Sadia Arshad is a reproductive justice nerd working in health communications during the day and doing youth empowerment and community engagement work at night. She fell into this work by accident, but couldn't be happier.

Groups audience: 

Lisbeth M Rivera

Lisbeth Meléndez Rivera is a 30+ year veteran of the LGBTQ and labor movements. Lisbeth has extensive experience organizing and training at the intersections of sexual orientation, gender identity, and culture, specifically as they relate to communities of color. Lisbeth has crisscrossed the country training workers and community leaders in organizing, leadership development, and community building strategies from a grassroots perspective. She has also done extensive work supporting LGBTQ leaders in America Latina.

Groups audience: 

Environmental Justice 101
This interactive workshop will allow participants to explore the intersections between environmental, climate, gender, and racial justice. Presenters will highlight cross-movement work, and innovative efforts that advance just solutions to environmental problems in the U.S. and internationally.
Speakers (click to view): Gusty Catherin, Daphne Chang

Environmental Justice 101

Speakers

Gusty Catherin

Gusty Catherin is a second year division two Hampshire college student. She is studying biology and public health through an environmental lens. Gusty has worked with CLPP, Climate Justice League, and Climate Action Now in the past.

Groups audience: 

Daphne Chang

Daphne Chang cares deeply about social justice that is intersectional and inclusive of all identities and life experiences. She organized for Mount Holyoke's Divestment from Fossil Fuels campaign and has been involved in environmental justice activism. She is developing her politics by educating herself on gender, racial, disability, sexuality, economic, reproductive, and immigrant justice.

Groups audience: 

Fighting for Reproductive Justice in Prisons
Focusing on the lived experiences of women and/or transgender people in prisons and jails, this session will expand participants' understanding of how sexism, racism and classism and gender-based violence are integral parts of these systems. Speakers will discuss innovative organizing models that ensure participation at the leadership level by incarcerated people and will focus on work happening around the country now, including campaigns to ban shackling during pregnancy, organizing to stop the building of new jails, and creating community-based wellness alternatives. Other forms of reproductive rights violations that occur while an individual is incarcerated such as forced sterilization, denial of health care, and threats to parental rights, will be brought to light.
Speakers (click to view): Rev. Jason Lydon, Marianne Bullock, Misty Rojo, Rachel Roth

Fighting for Reproductive Justice in Prisons

Speakers

Rev. Jason Lydon

Rev. Jason M. Lydon is a Unitarian Universalist community minister and the National Director of Black and Pink, an open family of LGBTQ prisoners and 'free world' allies who support each other.

Groups audience: 

Marianne Bullock

Marianne Bullock is one of the founders and Directors of The Prison Birth Project. She is an organizer and full spectrum doula.

Groups audience: 

Misty Rojo

Misty Rojo is part of a collective leadership structure at Justice Now, where she is the first co-director that has lived experience with incarceration. In the 3 years that Misty has come on board, she worked to helped the push to get SB 1135 passed to protect against coercive sterilizations in California women's prisons in 2014. In 2015, after 3 years of campaigning, she got a bill passed to expand access to an alternative custody program. Misty is a hardcore abolitionist believing all aspects of the criminal justice system and PIC need to be dismantled.

Groups audience: 

Rachel Roth

Rachel Roth is passionate about advancing reproductive justice and reducing imprisonment through research, policy analysis, and advocacy, partnering with the Prison Birth Project, Pretrial Working Group, and others. She is the author of the book Making Women Pay: The Hidden Costs of Fetal Rights and articles about abortion access, (un)safe childbirth, sterilization abuse, and shackling in prison. She blogs for MomsRising and lives near Boston.

Groups audience: 

From Urban to Rural to Global: We Need Environmental Justice Everywhere
How do millions of people, disproportionately people of color, forced into living within a mile of dirty energy and toxic producers bear the burden of our fossil fuel addiction with their bodies? How can GPS empower our communities? Panelists will explore the intersections between indigenous sovereignty, and environmental, gender, and racial justice. Presenters will detail governmental policies and activism that perpetuates environmental, climate, and reproductive INjustices in our communities, and innovative efforts that advance just solutions to environmental problems and create community connections to our lived-in and traditional environments.
Speakers (click to view): Elisabeth Lamar (She/Her), Ash Chan (She/Her), Jade S. Sasser (She/Her), Judy Dow (She/Her)

From Urban to Rural to Global: We Need Environmental Justice Everywhere

Speakers

Elisabeth Lamar (She/Her)

Elisabeth Lamar is a volunteer with the Sierra Club, The Climate Reality Project, and the ACLU. She advocates for reproductive, gender and climate justice.

Groups audience: 

Ash Chan (She/Her)

Ash Chan, a Pittsburgh transplant by way of the Bay Area, is a queer youth organizer dedicated to education justice, equity and holistic wellness. Through leadership development and the sharing of lived experiences, Ash aims to create brave, youth-centered spaces to educate, affirm, and empower young folx of color with the skills and resources to become leaders in their schools, communities, and lives. Ash aspires for a long-term career in public health at the intersections of reproductive justice, human rights & environmental sustainability

Groups audience: 

Jade S. Sasser (She/Her)

Jade S. Sasser is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Riverside. She is currently writing a book about why population debates are becoming popular in the context of climate change. Her broader research interests include climate justice, international development, women’s health, and the intersections between gender and technology.

Groups audience: 

Judy Dow (She/Her)

Judy Dow teaches science and history through art to all age levels. She teaches her students how to read the land and do the research necessary to decolonize the science and history they have learned. Mapping the story then creates a new replacement narrative.

Groups audience: 

Full Spectrum Reproductive Support: Doulas and Beyond
Everyone deserves access to non-judgmental emotional, physical, and informational support when moving through the full spectrum of reproductive experiences. In recent years, the doula model of care has been expanding to include not only birthing support, but also support for abortion, adoption, and reproductive loss. Come hear how various people and organizations are managing this landscape and add your ideas and questions to the conversation.
Speakers (click to view): Brenda Hernandez, Helen Bolton, Jasmine Errico

Full Spectrum Reproductive Support: Doulas and Beyond

Speakers

Brenda Hernandez

Brenda Hernandez is a law school diversity professional and a feminist activist. She is a trained abortion doula through the Boston Doula Project, and she writes for her blog, BoricuaFeminist.com. She has a BA in Women’s Studies from Mount Holyoke College and a JD from Pace University School of Law. Connect with her @boricuafeminist.

Groups audience: 

Helen Bolton

Helen is the Senior Program Associate for the U.S. Litigation Program at the Center for Reproductive Rights and the Membership Coordinator for the Doula Project, where she also volunteers as a full spectrum doula.

Groups audience: 

Jasmine Errico

Jasmine is a full spectrum doula, mama to two, and person in recovery. She is a current Francis Perkins student at Mount Holyoke College, a graduate of Holyoke Community College, and RRASC' 16. She formerly worked as a full spectrum doula and childbirth educator with Prison Birth Project and currently works with the Franklin County Doula Collective as well as independently in Hampshire and Hampden county. Her mission is to provide free doula services to families at the intersections of substance use, incarceration, poverty, domestic violence, and parenting.

Groups audience: 

Genitals Roadshow: BYOJ (Bring Your Own Junk)

This inclusive, fun, and interactive workshop aims to help people feel empowered and in control of their healthcare. Participants will learn and practice techniques for providing a comprehensive self-chest exam assessing either their own chest tissue or a Mammacare model. We will also review the techniques of self-pelvic exams — one of the presenters, a gynecological teaching associate, will use their body to explain the pelvic exam and will demonstrate correct speculum placement and invite participants to view their cervix. All participants will walk away with a plastic speculum and tips on how to troubleshoot using it at home. We will also review penile, testicular, and hernia exams. We ask that all participants who will view the pelvic exam demonstration be at least 18 years of age, but welcome participants of all ages to the overview portion of the workshop.

Speakers (click to view): Alexandra Duncan, Tiffany Cook

Genitals Roadshow: BYOJ (Bring Your Own Junk)

Speakers

Alexandra Duncan

Alexandra Duncan’s life is driven by the belief that knowledge and authority over a person’s body belongs to them. She gave her kindergarten class ‘the talk’; studied medical anthropology; and was an EMT, yoga teacher, full-spectrum doula, and gynecological teaching associate. She founded Praxis Clinical to provide universities, hospitals, and communities with clinical skills and health literacy workshops built around justice, access, and patient empowerment.

Groups audience: 

Tiffany Cook

Tiffany E. Cook’s reproductive justice framework comes from a hodgepodge of experience in health care, medical and sex education, abortion funding, and full spectrum doula care. She currently lives in Brooklyn and is the Training and Professional Development Coordinator for Diversity Affairs at NYU School of Medicine. When she’s not passionately advocating for social justice might find her cake decorating, gaming or posting on social media.

Groups audience: 

Gettin' Sh*t Done: A Young Persons Guide To Organizing and Self-Care
What are some ways you feel you have been treated differently in reproductive justice work because of your age or your student status? What are some common stereotypes often applied to us as a group, either positive and/or negative? And how do we navigate and deconstruct harmful narratives about our generation? Join us to discuss our experiences as young people in the RJ movement, developing our self-care practices, caring for our mental health, and harnessing our power as a generation. This is a closed space for young people.
Speakers (click to view): Madeline McCubbins, Nina Nicole Zamarripa

Gettin' Sh*t Done: A Young Persons Guide To Organizing and Self-Care

Speakers

Madeline McCubbins

Madeline McCubbins is a poor queer femme from Kentucky, who began organizing for reproductive rights and freedom as a student on University of Louisville's campus. Last summer, she was awarded a RRASC internship and worked with the Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center in South Dakota. She currently serves on Planned Parenthood’s Young Leaders Advisory Council.

Groups audience: 

Nina Nicole Zamarripa

Nina is a Chicana from the border town of Pharr, Texas. She's a fourth year student at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley majoring in Psychology with minors in Biology and Chemistry. She's an advocate for reproductive justice, immigration rights, and mental health — as well as dismantling machismo/marianismo in the RGV.

Groups audience: 

Gynoticians & the Fourth Estate: Debunking Media Myths & Anti-Choice Lies in the 2016 Presidential Election Cycle

According to the Guttmacher Institute, more than 282 anti-choice restrictions have been enacted since 2010, including many based on junk science and outright lies. Misinformation about abortion is running rampant as conservatives and their media allies gear up for the 2016 elections. With many candidates touting their anti-choice track records to appeal to an increasingly extreme base, it's more important than ever that those organizing working to protect access to a full range of reproductive health services are armed with the facts, messaging, and strategy to combat this misinformation in the media and in the field. This workshop will provide attendees with the skills to identify and pushback on this misinformation when they encounter it in the context of the breakneck pace of an election media news cycle.

Speakers (click to view): Pamela Merritt, Rachel Tardiff, Andrea L. Alford

Gynoticians & the Fourth Estate: Debunking Media Myths & Anti-Choice Lies in the 2016 Presidential Election Cycle

Speakers

Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

Groups audience: 

Rachel Tardiff

Rachel Tardiff is the Deputy Outreach Director at Media Matters for America. A graduate of American University, Rachel worked to help pass California’s Domestic Workers Bill of Rights and the state’s recent landmark equal pay legislation, and brought the stories of military rape survivors to Capitol Hill to push for unprecedented military policy change on the issue.

Groups audience: 

Andrea L. Alford

Andrea L. Alford is the former Director of Media Relations at FitzGibbon Media. Before joining FitzGibbon Media, Andrea was a media strategist at the ACLU where she worked on a variety of issues, including racial profiling, voting rights, and immigration. She also developed and implemented strategic communications plans to amplify and promote federal and state legislative initiatives for lobbyists and affiliates. Prior to the ACLU, she worked in the communications departments at the National Abortion Federation, NAACP, PowerPAC, and The U.S. House of Representatives. Based in D.C., Andrea grew up in Alexandria, Virginia and an American University alumna, where she received a degree in print journalism and history.

Groups audience: 

HIV Criminalization as a Reproductive Justice Issue: Dispatches from the South

There are presently 32 states that have laws that punish people for exposing another person to HIV, even in the absence of actual transmission. Research shows that rather than preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS, laws that criminalize HIV/AIDS status stigmatize people living with HIV/AIDS, and, in some cases, actively discourage people from getting tested and knowing their status. Presenters will share their own experiences as HIV-positive advocates on the front lines of fighting HIV criminalization laws in the South. They will engage participants in strategizing to fight these and other laws that target folks based on the condition of their bodies.

Speakers (click to view): Dana Asbury, Renae Taylor

HIV Criminalization as a Reproductive Justice Issue: Dispatches from the South

Speakers

Dana Asbury

Dana Asbury has family in many places. She lives in Memphis, TN with her partner, puppies, cat, and amongst a beautiful community of freedom fighters.

Groups audience: 

Renae Taylor

Renae Taylor is a community organizer and activist working for trans communities, communities impacted by HIV/AIDS, and Black liberation.

Groups audience: 

Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-Based Sex Ed for All
Our formal, school-based sex education is lacking. But what about our sexual pleasure education? It’s practically non-existent. How do we learn to make ourselves and our partners feel sexual pleasure? Often by accident, often by guess-and-check, and way-too-often in ways that are terribly misinformed by Google, social mores, and sweeping generalizations about what “everyone likes." This workshop will explore how we learn about pleasure by touching on some of our most pleasurable spots—the G-Spot, C-Spot (clitoris), and P-Spot (prostate). Where are these spots? Why do they feel good? What kind of sex toys, lubricants and communication strategies can we use to help us make them feel good? Walk away feeling empowered by new knowledge about how to bring yourself and your partners intentional pleasure in a straight-forward and relaxed learning environment. Propel radical sex education forward by starting in the most familiar place: with your own bodies, between your own sheets. This workshop does not equate anatomy with gender and will use language in line with those beliefs.
Speakers (click to view): Yana Tallon-Hicks

Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-Based Sex Ed for All

Speakers

Yana Tallon-Hicks

Yana Tallon-Hicks is a therapist, sex columnist, and a consent, sex and sexuality writer and educator living in Northampton, MA. She is a graduate of Hampshire College where she studied LGBTQ+ community and sex education, and is a RRASC alum. Her work centers around the belief that pleasure-positive and consent-based sex education can positively impact our lives and the world.

Groups audience: 

How We Win: Using Direct Action to Increase Access to Abortion and Advance Reproductive Justice
If we want to stop losing and start winning, we need to make it clear that we are unwilling to lose. In this interactive workshop, facilitators will lead a direct action training tailored to reproductive justice activists and advocates working at the grassroots level. Using examples and clear definitions, we will cover what direct action is, why direct action is a necessary part of the movement, and how it is effective in bringing about change. We will spotlight the work of intersectional social change activists, and prepare participants to lead direct actions in their own communities.
Speakers (click to view): Erin Matson, Pamela Merritt

How We Win: Using Direct Action to Increase Access to Abortion and Advance Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Erin Matson

Erin Matson is co-founder and co-director of Reproaction, a direct action group formed to increase access to abortion and advance reproductive justice. She lives in Arlington, Virginia.

Groups audience: 

Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

Groups audience: 

It's a Class Thing
It's a Class Thing: This interactive workshop will introduce the basics of social class and classism: What is it? Where is it? How does it play out? Group activities, dialogue, and personal reflection will give participants a dynamic way to learn about class, identify systemic examples of classism, and reflect on social class identity in order to bring the topic of class into our communities and movements so we can advance economic and racial justice at its intersection with reproductive justice. Participants will walk away with specific action plans to use in their organizing.
Speakers (click to view): Rachel Rybaczuk (She/Her or They/Them)

It's a Class Thing

Speakers

Rachel Rybaczuk (She/Her or They/Them)

Rachel Rybaczuk is as a queer, white, first-gen, working-class organizer and educator who advances social justice by leading trainings and workshops about class(ism) and race(ism), while highlighting the intersections of all forms of oppression. Rybaczuk’s consulting work with activists, educators, and non-profits is informed by her experience growing up poor in a racially diverse neighborhood in miami, as well as her queer feminist perspective on race, class, gender, and sexuality. she will brave new england winter walks if the right company is involved.

Groups audience: 

Kindreds: Reproductive Justice for Trans/GNC/Non-Binary People
In its third installation, we have decided to work amongst ourselves and center the question of reproductive justice and trans justice for trans, gender non-conforming, and non-binary folks only. Often in part of building the work, we have to take a moment to just talk about our specific experiences in order to make asks and demands that center our needs without the gaze of cisgender people. We will be talking about the heartbreaks, working through self-care strategies, finding ways to take breaths together, and sharing organizing opportunities for collaborations and building with one another as trans, GNC, and non-binary folks invested in or curious about a trans-specific reproductive justice agenda. This is a closed space for people who identify as trans, GNC, and/or non-binary.
Speakers (click to view): Lill Hewko, Ash Williams, Kate Silvette, Ola Osaze, Quita Tinsley, Lucia Leandro Gimeno

Kindreds: Reproductive Justice for Trans/GNC/Non-Binary People

Speakers

Lill Hewko

Lill Hewko, a queer, trans nonbinary, mixed-Latinx from a working-class background, is a prison abolitionist and reproductive justice lawyer focusing on race, gender, child welfare, incarceration, and healing. Lill co-founded the Incarcerated Parents Project and the Incarcerated Mothers Advocacy Project, and is a founding board member of Surge Reproductive Justice. Lill is an attorney at the Transgender Law Center and works with QTPOC Birthwerq Project.

Groups audience: 

Ash Williams

Ash Williams is a trans non-binary femme from Fayetteville, NC. As a Black Lives Matter organizer, Ash has educated the NC community about state-sanctioned violence as it relates to trans and queer people of color. Since 2013, this work has included leading rapid response actions, building solidarity and coalitions across differences, developing press strategies, designing campaigns, educating and mobilizing people on social media, and training other organizers. Ash is a 2016 Human Rights Advocacy Fellow in Residence and Ignite NC Fellow (working against voter suppression), and won the Cyrus M. Johnson Award for Peace and Social Justice in 2014 and the Charlotte Pride Young Catalyst Award in 2016. They hold a master's in Ethics and Applied Philosophy and a bachelor's in Philosophy from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Ash is also a dancer, choreographer, and dance teacher.

Groups audience: 

Kate Silvette

Kate Silvette is a Native, Chicanx, disabled queer femme who works to hold and support others in the rocky realms of racial justice, decolonial reproductive justice, disability justice, and queer, POC parenthood. Silvette is a birth, abortion, and postpartum doula working as the Program Manager of the Birth Doula Services Program at Open Arms Perinatal Services.

Groups audience: 

Ola Osaze

Ola Osaze is the national organizer for the Black LGBTQIA Migrant Project (BLMP), which protects and defends Black queer and trans migrants from immigration enforcement and criminal justice systems. Ola is a trans queer person from Nigeria who has also organized with the Audre Lorde Project, Uhuru Wazobia, and Sylvia Rivera Law Project, and has writings published in Queer Africa II, Saraba Magazine, Qzine, Black Looks, and Black Girl Dangerous, to name a few.

Groups audience: 

Quita Tinsley

Quita Tinsley is a fat, Black, queer femme that writes, organizes, and works to build sustainable change in their home, the South. They currently serve as the Deputy Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast; and they're an alum of Echoing Ida, a Black women and non-binary folks' writing collective of Forward Together.

Groups audience: 

My Body, My Choices: The Trans/GNC Health Education You Didn't Get in School!
Trans & gender non-conforming people often have questions about how to care for our bodies and not a lot of places to get answers. How can I reduce chances of infection when I don’t have safe access to a bathroom? Where can I find a binder that’s right for my chest? How do I tuck? How can I make prosthetics when I can’t afford them? What are the risks and benefits to silicone injections? What hormone and surgery options exist, and what will they do to my body? This workshop provides an overview of the health needs specific to trans/GNC people and a non-judgmental place to ask the questions you’ve been wanting to! This is a closed session for trans, gender non-conforming, and gender-questioning people.
Speakers (click to view): Cecilia M. Gentili (She/Her), Lyndon Cudlitz (He/Him)

My Body, My Choices: The Trans/GNC Health Education You Didn't Get in School!

Speakers

Cecilia M. Gentili (She/Her)

Originally from Argentina, Cecilia Gentili started working as an intern at the LGBT Center where she found her passion for advocacy and services and after that she ran the Transgender Health Program at Apicha CHC from 2012 to 2016. She currently serves as the Director of Policy and Public Affairs at GMHC. She was a contributor to Trans Bodies Trans Selves and is a collaborator with Translatina Network.

Groups audience: 

Lyndon Cudlitz (He/Him)

Lyndon Cudlitz trains healthcare providers, community organizations, and others in providing relevant services for queer & trans individuals. As a result of this work, Planned Parenthood affiliates in Upstate NY are now successfully providing hormone access, as well as other trans-affirming reproductive healthcare. Lyndon’s 16 years in social justice advocacy and LGBTQ health education is strongly informed by his transfeminist and working-class perspectives.

Groups audience: 

Not Just "A Woman and Her Doctor": Supporting All Pregnant People in Self-Care
Throughout history, people have sought reproductive health care from trusted community members who hold body knowledge, such as healers, herbalists, and midwives, to help them avoid pregnancy, regulate menstruation, give birth, induce abortions, or complete miscarriages. Today, though many people seek care from professionalized providers such as OB/GYNs and abortion clinics, others seek self-directed care on their own or within their communities for a range of reproductive needs. Seismic political shifts that have made the future of access to reproductive health services more uncertain than ever have also ignited interest in community-based and self-directed solutions. Each of us has a role to play: from destigmatizing self-care and holistic models of reproductive health care, to distributing reproductive health information (such as how to end a pregnancy), to using law and policy tools to ensure that pregnant people and the people who support them are safe from arrest.
Speakers (click to view): Kebé, Lydia James, Farah Diaz-Tello, Alison Ojanen-Goldsmith

Not Just "A Woman and Her Doctor": Supporting All Pregnant People in Self-Care

Speakers

Kebé

Kebé is the Program Coordinator for SIA Legal Team. She uses both legal advocacy and grassroots organizing as tools to shape law that supports all people in determining if, when, and how we will become pregnant and create family in safe communities, free from the threat of state and interpersonal violence. She hails from the Lowcountry of South Carolina and is a wanderer at heart.

Groups audience: 

Lydia James

Lydia James is a full spectrum doula focused on creating spaces and opportunities for people to exercise self-determination and bodily autonomy. After almost a decade in feminist and RJ spaces, she believes we can only have true reproductive justice when there are fewer gatekeepers over our reproductive lives.

Groups audience: 

Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah is a human rights attorney dedicated to the pursuit of reproductive justice, with a focus on dignity, self-determination, and freedom from violence and coercion in pregnancy and the full spectrum of pregnancy outcomes. She is Senior Counsel for the SIA Legal Team, and serves on the Board of All-Options.

Groups audience: 

Alison Ojanen-Goldsmith

Alison is an advocate, doula, and researcher whose work centers on herbal and home abortion, self-managed abortion, and peer-to-peer provision of abortion care and support through community networks. With over a decade of experience in reproductive health and justice research, direct service, and policy, she collaborates on creative projects that support and deepen our understanding of reproductive autonomy, abortion experiences, and safe abortion care.

Groups audience: 

Organizing Through Narratives: Telling Your Stories in a Campaign
This workshop is designed around educating individuals on how to organize themselves and others around a sexual and reproductive justice campaign. Folks will learn how to employ social media and storytelling in creating a successful campaign to create change in their communities, regardless of gender/bodies. Participants will also hear how this framework was employed recently at GMHC, involving some of NYC’s most vulnerable communities, such as Latinx people and immigrants, transgender and gender non-conforming people, and people living with HIV/AIDS.
Speakers (click to view): Cecilia Maria Gentili, Kaleb Oliver Dornheim

Organizing Through Narratives: Telling Your Stories in a Campaign

Speakers

Cecilia Maria Gentili

Ms. Gentili currently serves as the Director of Policy and Public Affairs at GMHC, the world’s first and leading provider of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy. Originally from Argentina, Ms. Gentili started working as an intern at the LGBT Center in New York City, where she found her passion for advocacy and services. She went on to run the Transgender Health Program at Apicha CHC from 2012 to 2016. She is also a contributor to Trans Bodies, Trans Selves: A Resource for the Transgender Community, and is a collaborator with Translatina Network.

Groups audience: 

Kaleb Oliver Dornheim

Kaleb Dornheim is 25, poor, trans/nonbinary, queer, mentally ill, Baltimore and Hudson Valley grounded, has their Masters in Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies concentrating in Trans Studies Education, and works at GMHC as a Sexual and Reproductive Advocate for TGNC folks. When they aren't working or doing activism, they like being around farm animals, plants, and engaging in Kardashian Discourse.

Groups audience: 

Parenting with Dignity: The Policing of Mothers of Color
The criminal justice system, welfare reform, and the health care profession interact in order to regulate and isolate poor mothers of color. We must expand our movement’s discussion of parenting to center the experiences of women of color. Join our collaborative group to identify points of access for reproductive justice that will effectively stop the policing of mothers of color and eliminate the harmful effects on our communities.
Speakers (click to view): Stephanie Croney (She/Her), Emily R. Champlin (She/Her), Sequoia Ayala (She/Her)

Parenting with Dignity: The Policing of Mothers of Color

Speakers

Stephanie Croney (She/Her)

Stephanie Croney is an If/When/How Policy Fellow at the Black Women's Health Imperative. She recently graduated from Howard University's School of Law. She is passionate about child advocacy, intimate partner violence, and family court/foster care/child welfare reform.

Groups audience: 

Emily R. Champlin (She/Her)

Emily R. Champlin is a lifelong feminist and social justice advocate. After receiving her BA in Feminist Studies, she worked as a domestic violence advocate focusing on LGBTQ survivors. Throughout law school, she was avidly involved in studying and promoting reproductive justice. As a Fellow, her work focuses on the intersecting barriers of racism, limited English proficiency, immigration status, and cultural competency in accessing comprehensive health care.

Groups audience: 

Sequoia Ayala (She/Her)

Sequoia Ayala received her law degree and master’s degree in International Relations from the American University Washington College of Law and School of International Service, respectively. As the Law and Policy Fellow at SisterLove, Sequoia works collaboratively with community members, elected officials, and policymakers in advancement of the health, well-being, and human rights of Black women living with HIV/AIDS, those at risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, and for all individuals who belong to marginalized communities that are severely and disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS, especially in the Deep South and Global South. Additionally, she is a Georgia licensed attorney who provides low-cost legal assistance in family law and immigration. A proud University of Georgia alumna and native Georgian, Sequoia resides in Atlanta with her husband and two sons.

Groups audience: 

People's History of Adoption Justice
Throughout history, the state removal of children from their families and communities has been used as a genocidal attack on native communities and communities of color, further advanced and fueled by missionary interests. While complicated, the historical contexts of the Indian Child Welfare Act, transnational adoption, and the rights of youth in state custody are fundamentally about reproductive justice. Let's talk about adoption justice by examining modern practices of adoption through the historical context of colonialism. Through storytelling and an intersectional analysis, panelists will open a conversation about the implications of the oppressive origins of modern adoption practice and implementing a community justice approach to family creation within the intricacies of race, class, power and privilege, sovereignty, and self-determination.
Speakers (click to view): Yong Chan Miller, Coya White Hat-Artichoker

People's History of Adoption Justice

Speakers
Radical Lawyering and Struggles for Justice

What tensions arise for lawyers who are providing advocacy and legal services, while at the same time seeking to transform systems — and end state violence? The presenters, who are activists and lawyers, will share their experiences, discuss why they have chosen to pursue advocacy work as lawyers and how they are now using the law to advance systemic change, and encourage participants to think about what becoming a radical lawyer would mean for them.

Speakers (click to view): Farah Diaz-Tello, nia weeks, Christa Douaihy, Esq., Lill Hewko

Radical Lawyering and Struggles for Justice

Speakers

Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah Diaz-Tello, JD, is a Senior Staff Attorney at National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW). Her work focuses on the rights to medical decision-making and birthing with dignity, and on using the international human rights framework to protect the humanity of pregnant women regardless of their circumstances. A proud Texan, she is an alumna of UT Austin & the CUNY Law School.

Groups audience: 

nia weeks

Nia Weeks is a native of New Orleans, Louisiana. After completing her secondary education at Ursuline Academy, she received her bachelor’s degree in Communications with a minor in Women's studies at Indiana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana. After completing her undergraduate education, Ms Weeks embarked on a career doing public relations for a non profit organizations in Gainesville, Florida. Ms. Weeks began her legal career at Florida Coastal School of Law in Jacksonville, Florida in 2007 and transferred to Loyola School of Law New Orleans in 2009. After passing the Louisiana Bar, Ms. Weeks served as a law clerk and was the director of a supervised visitation center for victims of domestics violence named Harmony House. She now is at Women with a Vision as the Director of Policy and Advocacy after serving as a public defender in Orleans Parish for 2 years.

Groups audience: 

Christa Douaihy, Esq.

Christa Douaihy, Esq is a supervising attorney in the Civil Action Practice and leader of one of the interdisciplinary teams at The Bronx Defenders. She provides advocacy and direct representation to Bronx residents who are fighting life-altering civil consequences of police contact and court involvement.

Groups audience: 

Lill Hewko

Lillian Hewko is an attorney at the Incarcerated Parents Project in Seattle, WA. They use the reproductive justice framework to bring incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals together to advocate for systemic change. A graduate of the University of Washington School of Law, Lillian identifies as a queer mixed-Latinx from a working-class background. Lillian is a board member of Surge, a reproductive justice collaborative.

Groups audience: 

Redefining Allyship: Communities of Color Building Trust, Recognizing Privilege, and Uniting in Solidarity
Being an ally means engaging in a lifelong process of being intentional in how we show up for others. Within our communities, there are various identities that make being a person of color a rich experience. While our priority will always lie in centering the voices of our own communit(ies), solidarity among and within communities of color is becoming increasingly imperative in a political climate that seeks to divide us. How can communities of color unite in solidarity while also recognizing how our various identities and biases can impact how we do this? In this workshop, participants will explore how our intersected identities can shape the ways in which we show up for people within our communit(ies), identify how our various forms of privilege and biases can impact how we show up for other communities of color, and develop strategies for establishing meaningful connections to building intentional solidarity within communities of color.
Speakers (click to view): Nicole Clark, LMSW

Redefining Allyship: Communities of Color Building Trust, Recognizing Privilege, and Uniting in Solidarity

Speakers

Nicole Clark, LMSW

Nicole Clark is a licensed social worker, reproductive justice activist, and owner of Nicole Clark Consulting, where she works with POC and women-led organizations to design, implement, and evaluate culturally responsive programming and services for women and girls of color, with a racial justice and intersectional analysis.

Groups audience: 

Religion, Spirituality, and Our Struggles for Justice
For many of us, our activist work is guided by our religious or spiritual beliefs. For some, there is a disconnect that deserves to be healed. How do we bring our whole selves into our activist work? How do we mobilize our faith communities to join the fight for justice? Join panelists from from diverse religious traditions as we discuss connecting our religious and spiritual lives with our work for reproductive justice, abortion rights, and LGBTQ justice. Participants will gain an understanding of why collaborative partnerships with faith communities can be important in this work, how religious leaders are currently engaging with the movement, and learn about examples of successful religious/secular partnerships from progressive movements.
Speakers (click to view): Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz (She/Her), Dori Midnight (She/Her), Sadia Arshad (She/Her), Toni M. Bond Leonard (She/Her)

Religion, Spirituality, and Our Struggles for Justice

Speakers

Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz (She/Her)

Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz is the Executive for Program and Strategic Partnerships at the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. She began organizing around racial and gender justice at Wheaton College in Massachusetts in the early 90’s. After college she began a 25 year journey as a movement builder, cultural worker and writer working across issues of LGBT liberation, racial, disability and gender justice. She was on the first LGBTQ delegation to Palestine in 2012 and has been a frequent blogger and writer for many feminist and racial justice publications. In 2002, she was a contributing author to the groundbreaking anthology Colonize This! Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism.

Groups audience: 

Dori Midnight (She/Her)

Dori Midnight practices community-based intuitive healing that weaves together plant and stone medicine, ancestral and queer magic, and anti-oppression work. Drawing on traditions from her mixed ancestry (Sephardi/Ashkenazi/Roma) and her training as a clinical herbalist and interfaith minister, Dori's work is grounded in self-determinism and collective liberation and is inspired/supported by the works/magics of disability and healing justice and Jewish earth-based practices.

Groups audience: 

Sadia Arshad (She/Her)

Sadia Arshad is a reproductive justice nerd working in health communications during the day and doing youth empowerment and community engagement work at night. She fell into this work by accident and couldn't be happier.

Groups audience: 

Toni M. Bond Leonard (She/Her)

Toni Bond Leonard is a reproductive justice activist and womanist ethicist who works at the intersection of religion and reproductive justice. She is one of the twelve founding mothers who coined the term "reproductive justice" in 1994. She has worked in the reproductive health, rights, and justice movements for the past 25 years and has led an abortion fund, co-founded one of the first black women's reproductive justice groups, Black Women for Reproductive Justice, and has chaired the boards of the National Network of Abortion Funds and SisterSong. She is currently a member of the Advisory Committee for CLPP.

Groups audience: 

Remembering the Voice of the Body in our Organizing Work
An opportunity for people, no matter their physical ability, to explore how using an embodied approach to connection can deepen our capacity to learn, grow, and thrive. We will use active listening, play, rhythm, movement inquiry, and collaborative practice to tune into the innate intelligence of the body, allowing its voice to inform our decision making within the workshop. We will then reflect on how these skills can translate into our lives as activists, leaders, teachers, students, and community members.
Speakers (click to view): Jamila Jackson, Rikkia Pereira

Remembering the Voice of the Body in our Organizing Work

Speakers

Jamila Jackson

Jamila Jackson is a dancer and the co - facilitator of The (So)ul Connected Project. The project uses movement as a way to build community, develop leadership skills, provide college access, and access our inner healing and creative resources.

Groups audience: 

Rikkia Pereira

Rikkia Pereira is a third year dance concentrator at Hampshire College. She is currently doing research based in leadership and emotional theory that explores how dance can be used to navigate the body in community.

Groups audience: 

Reproductive Justice Beyond Bars
Participants will delve into our criminal justice and child welfare systems to learn how historically and currently, low-income, immigrant, queer and native peoples are forced to navigate child welfare systems that make the right to have a family a matter of proving their fitness to parent. Panelists will discuss the rights and injustices faced by incarcerated and previously incarcerated sex workers, the foster care-to-prison pipeline, and state sanctioned violence against pregnant and birthing people within the criminal justice system. Participants will learn about transformative legal and community based strategies for change including video, policy, & advocacy activities aimed at building leadership and mobilizing individuals in prison.
Speakers (click to view): Lill M. Hewko (They/Them or She/Her), Alex Andrews (She/Her), Jaz Walker (She/Her), Misty Rojo (She/Her or They/Them)

Reproductive Justice Beyond Bars

Speakers

Lill M. Hewko (They/Them or She/Her)

Lill Hewko, an attorney and activist, uses the reproductive justice framework to bring incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals together to advocate for systemic change. A graduate of the University of Washington School of Law. Lill identifies as a queer, mixed-Latinx from a working-class background.

Groups audience: 

Alex Andrews (She/Her)

As a formerly incarcerated sex worker and the co founder for SWOP Behind Bars, Alex Andrews knew it was critical to start reaching men and women who were experiencing the harm of the criminalization of sex work. As the North American Representative for NSWP, Alex hopes to amplify the voices of incarcerated sex workers around the world.

Groups audience: 

Jaz Walker (She/Her)

Jazmyne Walker organizes with Black On Both Sides, which addresses issues of state violence against black mothers and the Foster Care systems of funneling black youth into the juvenile justice system. Jazmyne is passionate about the work being done and the mentor(s) who model and guide her through this struggle. Through political education and self-awareness, Jazmyne is adamant about applying what she is learning to heal herself along with her community.

Groups audience: 

Misty Rojo (She/Her or They/Them)

Misty Rojo comes to prison abolition work after leaving home at 14 and ultimately leaving an abusive relationship at 23, only to end up serving a 10 year prison sentence. While incarcerated, Misty was mentored by true activists and survivors, learning the meaning of self-determination and resilience. Misty's work focuses on campaigns to build coalitions and bring about policy change using an intersectional prison abolition framework. Misty has sponsored two California state bills that directly impact people in CA women's prisons and their families, and continues to work in collaboration with CA RJ groups to expand reproductive rights and access to care in prisons.

Groups audience: 

Reproductive Justice Roundtable
A conversation among leaders in the field, about the evolution and current state of the reproductive justice movement, their own trajectories in the movement, how the reproductive justice framework has advanced their advocacy, and the challenges facing reproductive justice activists and advocates today.
Speakers (click to view): Coya White Hat-Artichoker, Paulina Helm-Hernandez, Cherisse Scott, Marlene Gerber Fried, Monica Raye Simpson

Reproductive Justice Roundtable

Speakers

Coya White Hat-Artichoker

Coya was born and raised on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota; she is a proud enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Coya has been doing activist work in various communities and movements since the age of 15

Groups audience: 

Paulina Helm-Hernandez

Paulina Helm-Hernandez is a queer femme cha-cha girl, artist, trainer, political organizer, strategist & trouble-maker-at-large from Veracrúz, México. This Chicana grew up in rural North Carolina, and is currently growing roots in Atlanta, GA. She has been the Co-Director of Southerners on New Ground (SONG) for 9 years.

Groups audience: 

Cherisse Scott

Cherisse Scott is the founder and CEO of SisterReach, Tennessee’s only reproductive justice organization. Under Ms. Scott’s leadership, SisterReach has released a 2015 report on the need for comprehensive sex ed for southern youth of color, rolled out their ProWoman Billboard campaign and presented to the United Nations Working Group on the Issue of Discrimination against Women in Law and Practice (UNWGDAW) on the impact of the fetal assault law on TN women.

Groups audience: 

Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a long time activist for abortion rights and reproductive justice. She is the professor and faculty director of CLPP, the founding president of the National Network of Abortion Funds (NNAF) and the Abortion Rights Fund of Western MA. Marlene is a co-author with Silliman, Ross and Gutierrez of Undivided Rights. She is a recipient of the 2015 NNAF Vanguard Award, the 2014 Felicia Stewart Advocacy Award (APHA), and the SisterSong Warrior Woman Award.

Groups audience: 

Monica Raye Simpson

Monica Raye Simpson is the Executive Director of SisterSong, and has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, and the systematic physical and emotional violence inflicted upon Black people with an emphasis on Black Southerners and LGBTQ people. She is also a singer, full circle Doula and was named a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine & a 40 under 40 leader by the Advocate.

Groups audience: 

Say Something: Preventing Interpersonal Violence in Your Communities
Whoever you are, whatever your profession is, and whomever you come into contact with – everyone can Say Something to help prevent interpersonal violence. To support people of all genders in their ongoing efforts to create a safer community, Safe Passage offers The Prevention LAB: a social experiment in creating safe community. In this interactive workshop, participants will work together to build skills of assertive communication and boundary-setting across various relationships using scenarios that are generated from real life experiences.
Speakers (click to view): Laura Penney (She/Her)

Say Something: Preventing Interpersonal Violence in Your Communities

Speakers

Laura Penney (She/Her)

Laura Penney has been working in the field of domestic and sexual violence for over eight years. She received her BA from UMass Amherst in Social Thought and Political Economy, and is currently an MSW candidate at Westfield State University. Laura is presently the Director of Community Engagement at Safe Passage, and serves as the Project Director for the prevention initiative Say Something.

Groups audience: 

Sex Work and Reproductive Justice
People engaged in sex work face unique barriers when accessing healthcare, housing, and freedom from incarceration or state violence. From Stop and Frisk and Crimes Against Nature laws to efforts to restrict access to social or health services based on current or former sex work, reproductive oppression is institutionalized for people engaged in (or perceived to be engaged in) sex work. How can our movement shift to destigmatize and support those engaged in sex work? Join activists working to challenge and re-frame narratives around sex work and address the healthcare inaccess, criminalization, and harmful policies targeting some of the most marginalized people in our communities through organizing, community building, and advocacy work.
Speakers (click to view): Nia Weeks, Amber Batts, Bella Vendetta, Jenna Torres

Sex Work and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Nia Weeks

Nia Weeks the director of Policy and Advocacy at Women With A Vision, located in New Orleans, Louisiana. She is a native of New Orleans, and has spent years fighting for the rights of women, children, and families. As a former public defender and the inaugural Director of Policy and Advocacy for WWAV, her goals for the department is to cover not only broad, national trends, but also take a specific deep dive into the conditions of all Black women.

Groups audience: 

Amber Batts

Sex worker deemed sex trafficker from Alaska, where consensual sex workers organized together for safety and security is sex trafficking according to legislation. In 2014 I was charged for sex trafficking due to operating a progressive coalition business featuring sex workers. I was sentenced to 5.5 years and currently I am on discretionary parole.

Groups audience: 

Bella Vendetta

Bella Vendetta is a veteran of the adult industry, as an award winning performer and director of fetish films, a sex workers' rights advocate, and as a stripper and professional Dominatrix with over 15 years of training and experience.

Groups audience: 

Jenna Torres

Jenna Torres is a community advocate and human rights supporter. She is a published author, spoken word artist, entrepreneur, and above all a proud mother to three beautiful children! She believes people have agency to make the best decisions possible in order to survive. She defends them and works with communities to build realistic solutions to real life problems like violence, poverty, and discrimination. Jenna’s vision is to empower communities often overlooked and overcriminalized.

Groups audience: 

Sex Work and Reproductive Justice
People in the sex trade face unique barriers when accessing healthcare, housing, and freedom from incarceration. Reproductive oppression is institutionalized for people engaged in (or perceived to be engaged in) sex work, from Stop and Frisk and Crimes Against Nature laws to efforts to restrict access to social or health services based on current or former sex work. Join activists working to challenge and re-frame narratives around sex work and address the healthcare inaccess, criminalization, and aggressive policies targeting some of the most marginalized people in our communities.
Speakers (click to view): Nakita Shavers, Sienna Baskin, Zil Goldstein

Sex Work and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Nakita Shavers

Nakita Shavers is a native of New Orleans and has a long history of community advocacy and education. She is the Sexual Reproductive Health Coordinator at Women With A Vision, LLC. She is also the founder and executive director of the Dinerral Shavers Educational Fund (DSEF), and co-founder of Silence Is Violence Anti-Violence Organization.

Groups audience: 

Sienna Baskin

Sienna Baskin is Managing Director of the Sex Workers Project (SWP). The Sex Workers Project provides client-centered legal and social services to individuals who engage in sex work, regardless of whether they do so by choice, circumstance, or coercion, while engaging in policy advocacy to protect their rights.

Groups audience: 

Stand Up To Population Alarmism
Many of us learn from school and the media that "overpopulation" is one of the major causes, if not the major cause, of hunger, poverty, environmental degradation, migration, and even political instability. "Overpopulation" thinking often leads to harmful policies and campaigns that undermine reproductive freedom and environmental justice. Learn to combat it with fresh, feminist perspectives on population, the environment, and organizing.
Speakers (click to view): Anne Hendrixson

Stand Up To Population Alarmism

Speakers

Anne Hendrixson

Anne Hendrixson is the director of PopDev, the Population and Development Program at Hampshire College.

Groups audience: 

Staying Connected to the Movement while Parenting
As parents, people planning to parent, and people deciding whether to parent, we will name and address our collective needs. Facilitators and participants, experts of their own lives, will share ideas and resources that uplift parenting and support people in both naming our parenting needs in movement spaces and centering justice within our ideas of family. Bring your questions and needs around conception and birth (sperm donation, fertility, birth experiences), paths to parenting that include fostering and adoption, building social justice in our families and communities, working outside the home while parenting, bringing activist work into our children's schools and upbringing, and the ongoing struggle for institutional support of parenting (paid sick leave, parental leave, pay equity). Through small group break-outs, group discussion and networking, we will envision movement space that supports families' needs and parents' ability to participate fully.
Speakers (click to view): Jaspreet Chowdhary (She/Her), Katie McKay Bryson (She/Her)

Staying Connected to the Movement while Parenting

Speakers

Jaspreet Chowdhary (She/Her)

Jaspreet Chowdhary received a B.A. in English and Women’s Studies from Goucher College, a M.P.H. in Epidemiology from Tulane University, and a J.D. from Seattle University School of Law. She is currently the Senior Policy Specialist at the 30 for 30 campaign. She was part of the inaugural class of the If/When/How Fellowship program and was placed at the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum.

Groups audience: 

Katie McKay Bryson (She/Her)

Katie McKay Bryson is a single mom & foster parent living on traditional Dena'ina territory in Alaska. Active in environmental, reproductive, and social justice movement work since her early teens, she's currently a grant writer for an Alaska Native tribal coalition, and works to build embrace of Indian Child Welfare Act rights among non-Native activists and foster/adoptive parents.

Groups audience: 

Transforming Masculinity: Is It Possible?

When looking at the impacts of misogyny and sexism it is clear that there are many layers to unpack. How do we begin to heal from the daily effects of patriarchy? What does healing even look like when things like street harassment are normalized? This session will host breakout caucuses for people of color and for white people to have safer spaces to unpack and examine the strategies we use for challenging and healing from the trauma of gender-based violence.

Speakers (click to view): Lucia Leandro Gimeno, Sean Saifa Wall

Transforming Masculinity: Is It Possible?

Speakers

Lucia Leandro Gimeno

Lucia Leandro Gimeno is an Afro-Latinx, trans masculine femme bruja/organizer based in Atlanta, GA. A graduate of Columbia University’s School of Social Work, LL lived in New York City for 15 years organizing with queer and trans people of color communities. A current member of Black Lives Matter – Atlanta chapter, LL is also a future full-spectrum birthworker doing capacity building with The Queer & Trans People of Color Birthwerq Project to help mend the disconnect between trans justice and reproductive justice.

Groups audience: 

Sean Saifa Wall

Sean Saifa Wall is an intersex artist and activist whose goal is to create a world that is safe for Black bodies and intersex bodies to exist in. You can connect with him on social media or through his website, saifaemerges.com.

Groups audience: 

Voting for Justice
As our fears become realized in the national political theater, the connection between electoral politics and our livelihood has become sharply clear: lawmakers and politicians impact our daily lives and our reproductive futures. How can engaging in politics at the local level offer real change in our communities? How can combating voter suppression and getting our most marginalized voters to the polls change our local — and national — political landscape? Join this panel of activists working to break down barriers to voting and empower communities across the country to invest in grassroots political work.
Speakers (click to view): Monica Simpson, Randi Gregory, Nourbese Flint

Voting for Justice

Speakers

Monica Simpson

Monica is the Executive Director of SisterSong: Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. Monica has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, racism and intolerance and is deeply invested in southern movement building. Because of her “artivism” Monica was named as a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine and chosen as one of Advocate Magazine’s 40 under 40 leaders.

Groups audience: 

Randi Gregory

Randi has been organizing on electoral, union, and issue based campaigns for the last 8 years. She is dedicated to bringing grassroots organizing and public policy to marginalized communities, specifically LGBTQIA youth of color. She previously worked for SEIU and NARAL Pro Choice Ohio as well as various state Democratic parties as a field director. Currently Randi serves as the Director of Programs for SPARK Reproductive Justice Now, where she is responsible for their field and policy work.

Nourbese Flint

Nourbese Flint is a blerd with a background in reproductive justice, journalism, all things X-Men and Batman related, matte lipsticks, Bob's Burgers, and Star Trek. She is currently working at Black Women for Wellness where she directs policy, RJ programs, civic engagement graphics, and keeping markers and crayons organized.

Groups audience: 

We Never Survive Alone: Nurturing Dependence for Femmes of Color
What does dependency look like? Who do you count on for your survival? This is a closed space for trans, queer, & disabled femmes of color where we will use self-reflection, discussion, and journaling exercises to explore how we depend on one another for survival and envision new futures where our complex existences are celebrated. In this session, we will explore and learn new skills to navigate social and emotional accountability, healing from stigmatized dependence, and practice vulnerability to form accountable supportive relationships in our personal lives.
Speakers (click to view): Morgan Collado (She/Her), Noreen Khimji (They/Them)

We Never Survive Alone: Nurturing Dependence for Femmes of Color

Speakers

Morgan Collado (She/Her)

Morgan Collado is a working class femme trans latina. She is co-director of Cicada Collective and assistant director of North Texas Abortion Support Network. She is also a facilitator, organizer, performance artist, and published poet of the book Make Love to Rage. Her work centers around leaving a legacy behind for girls like her who are often erased from history and movement spaces.

Groups audience: 

Noreen Khimji (They/Them)

Noreen Khimji is a desi/South Asian femme trans disabled artist, writer, doula, and community organizer. They are co-founder and co-director of Cicada Collective, as well as sole founder and director of the North Texas Abortion Support Network (NTX ASN), a practical support network that provides transportation and more to individuals seeking abortion in DFW.

Groups audience: 

What's Mental Health Got To Do With It?
How do we realize reproductive health and autonomy for those living with "mental illness" or facing institutionalization? What would a radical vision of mental health look like when so many of us who struggle with our mental health and/or untreated trauma end up in prisons or institutions, especially poor folks of color? How do psychiatric diagnoses impact those already experiencing marginalization? Join this panel of activists working to increase mental health supports and systems from social work to community health to peer recovery and the psychiatric survivor movement to unpack these questions and more.
Speakers (click to view): Malaika Puffer (She/Her), Sean Donovan (He/Him), Crystal M. Hayes (She/Her)

What's Mental Health Got To Do With It?

Speakers

Malaika Puffer (She/Her)

Malaika Puffer is a psychiatric survivor and subversive innovator who was politicized by her experiences as a survivor of the mental health system. She now spends her paid and unpaid time collaborating with others towards a more effective, respectful, rights-conscious, and just response to emotional distress. To this end, she is a co-founder and active member of the Hive Mutual Support Network, manages peer support services for a community mental health agency, and writes for the website Mad In America.

Groups audience: 

Sean Donovan (He/Him)

Sean Donovan is part of the Western Mass Recovery Learning Community—mutual support and advocacy for and by folks who’ve experienced psychiatric diagnosis, trauma, hospitalization, oppression or just being different. He’s found much wisdom in this community facilitating Alternatives to Suicide and “queer-to-queer” support groups, advocating for rights alongside hospitalized folks and helping create films about chemical imbalance myth and power/oppression in the psych system.

Groups audience: 

Crystal M. Hayes (She/Her)

Crystal Hayes is a troublemaker who refuses to be silent in the face of oppression. She can be reached via Twitter @motherjustice. She's also working on her doctorate in social work. Her research focuses on the birthing experiences of incarcerated women