Conference Workshops

%1workshops

Friday 4:30PM - 6:00PM

Age Does Not Define a Good Parent: Shifting the Narrative Around Youth Sexuality
The dominant framework around youth sexuality fails to recognize the complex socioeconomic realities Latinx youth experience. Join California Latinas for Reproductive Justice (CLRJ) as we discuss how our long-term initiative, Justice for Young Families (J4YF), is shifting the narrative around pregnant and parenting youth through social media campaigns and storytelling. By creating their own memes, videos, blogs, and even testifying in Sacramento for legislative hearings, our Young Parent Leaders are unapologetically carving their own space and are at the forefront of policy changes that directly impact the health and well-being of young parents across California. Ensuring that all pregnant and parenting youth have the ability to parent (or not parent) their children in a safe and supportive environment, free of violence and judgment, and have access to vital resources needed to thrive is a reproductive justice issue.
Speakers (click to view): Rosalinda Guzman, Lorena García Zermeño

Age Does Not Define a Good Parent: Shifting the Narrative Around Youth Sexuality

Speakers

Rosalinda Guzman

Rosalinda Guzman is a fierce Young Parent Leader and advocate. She has been part of CLRJ's long-term culture shift initiative Justice for Young Families (J4YF) since 2016 and is currently part of the Young Parent Leaders Council (YPLC) in the Central Valley, CA. Rosalinda has been her own spokesperson, uplifting her experience as a young parent and advocating for policy changes that will impact her community.

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Lorena García Zermeño

Lorena García Zermeño is the Program Coordinator for California Latinas for Reproductive Justice and spearheads our Justice for Young Families (J4YF) initiative, where she works closely with CLRJ’s amazing young parent leaders. She graduated in 2014 from UC Santa Cruz and double majored in Anthropology and Feminist Studies with a concentration in Law, Politics and Social Change.

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Artivism 101: How Arts and Culture Are Integral to Our Fight for Reproductive Freedom
In order to build new futures, we must first imagine them. And it will take creativity to address long-standing problems facing our communities. Now more than ever, the role of artists and cultural workers are essential to our social movements. In this interactive workshop, we will identify and discuss how artists and cultural workers partner with institutions and work on their own to create performances, illustrations, and other works that advance reproductive freedom. Using the technology of improvisation and freestyle, the workshop will culminate with the sacred tradition of the cypher. We will devise mantras, calls and responses, poetry, rap, rhythm, and movement to co-create a collective freedom song that honors our visions for bodily autonomy and reproductive justice.
Speakers (click to view): Taja Lindley

Artivism 101: How Arts and Culture Are Integral to Our Fight for Reproductive Freedom

Speakers

Taja Lindley

Taja Lindley is an artist based in Brooklyn. She is the founder of Colored Girls Hustle, and a member of Echoing Ida and Harriet's Apothecary. // ColoredGirlsHustle.com // TajaLindley.com

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Birth Justice 101
This workshop will introduce participants to the Birth Justice framework by examining how pregnancy, birth, and parenting intersect with social, racial, and economic justice. We will also explore the rising maternal and infant mortality rates in this country, with a particular lens toward intersectional analysis. Participants will have the opportunity to get involved with interactive methods and tools to build the Birth Justice movement and strategize about how to utilize a radical approach to organizing, education, and access to birth options, including midwifery care.
Speakers (click to view): Jamarah Amani, Hadassah, Mahoro, Nalubaale and Mosiah

Birth Justice 101

Speakers

Jamarah Amani, Hadassah, Mahoro, Nalubaale and Mosiah

Jamarah Amani is a community midwife and mother of four. Her mission is to do her part to build a movement for birth justice locally, nationally and globally. A community organizer from the age of 16, Jamarah has worked with several organizations across the United States, the Caribbean, and in Africa on various public health issues. She is currently the director of Southern Birth Justice Network, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.

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Combatting Settler-Terrorism Through Indigenous Liberation
There can be no justice on stolen, indigenous land without indigenous justice. Oli (Osage/Chichimeca/Mvskoke) and Ashley (Oglala Lakota/Absentee Shawnee) will use Oklahoma indigenous grassroots resistance as a foray into a discussion about settler-terrorism, racial justice, indigenous liberation, environmental justice, cross-movement collaboration, and bridge building. With the ever-pressing threat of occupied leaders “Oklahomanizing” the rest of the so-called United States, there is much to learn from those on the frontlines in Oklahoma actively resisting settler-terrorism, climate change, and oppressive policies that contribute to mass incarceration, environmental genocide, and high rates of police killings of indigenous and black people. Participants will walk away with a better understanding of their relationship to the land, the struggles faced by those involved in frontline grassroots indigenous resistance, and how to stop complicity in systems that contribute to and perpetuate the silencing, erasure, and genocide of indigenous peoples.
Speakers (click to view): Ashley Nicole McCray, oli ramirez

Combatting Settler-Terrorism Through Indigenous Liberation

Speakers

Ashley Nicole McCray

Ashley Nicole McCray is a grassroots indigenous organizer from the Oglala Lakota Nation and Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma. Ashley fights on behalf of indigenous liberation, racial justice, and the environment in Oklahoma and across Indian Country.

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oli ramirez

oli is a native youth from oklahoma who partakes in direct action and direct action training who encourages diverse network building to help each other with tactics and knowledge to help achieve goals.

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Funding the Movement: Strategies for Foundation Fundraising and Rapid Response Resources for Reproductive Justice Activists
Reproductive justice and social justice organizations rely heavily on funding from foundations. Yet if all of U.S. foundation giving were represented by one dollar, only seven cents would go to organizations that work on issues connected to women and girls. Even fewer than seven cents is allocated to organizations that are grassroots, lack 501c3 status, are led by young people, are led by women of color and indigenous women, are led by transgender or non-binary people, and/or are located in rural areas and/or red states. However, these areas and communities are often most impacted by reproductive injustice and oppression. Third Wave Fund is a national funder of youth-led reproductive and gender justice organizing, activism, and healing, with a focus on issues and communities that have traditionally been left out of philanthropy. This workshop will provide an introduction to philanthropy, tips on how to seek foundation funding, and an overview of the research, proposal, and follow-up processes. Participants will have an opportunity to practice skills, ask questions, and get the info they need to build grants resources for their groups, communities, and movements!
Speakers (click to view): Joy Messinger, mai doan

Funding the Movement: Strategies for Foundation Fundraising and Rapid Response Resources for Reproductive Justice Activists

Speakers

Joy Messinger

Joy Messinger is a queer, disabled, femme organizer of spreadsheets, funding, and people to build sustainability, healing, wellness, and power for reproductive justice, queer and trans liberation, and disabled, migrant, and POC communities. As Third Wave Fund's Program Officer, she oversees Third Wave's rapid response, multi-year general support, and capacity building grantmaking and supports its cross-sector philanthropic advocacy.

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mai doan

mai is queer writer, facilitator, and healing justice lover living in Chicago, IL. she brings over 10 years of experience as a youth worker and advocate focused on gender and reproductive justice to her position as a Program Assistant with the Third Wave Fund.

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How to Fight the Right
Successful campaigns must include both offensive and defensive strategies. By taking into account the who, how, and why of our opposition, we become more capable of anticipating and confronting the myriad ways in which they attempt to thwart our liberation. In this workshop, participants will gain a general understanding of the network of organizations and individuals who represent the greatest threats to reproductive justice, the ideologies that fuel them, and the strategies and mechanisms used to advance their agenda. Woven into this framing will be examples of diverse and creative forms of resistance from frontline organizers in order to spark and inspire our collective imagination. With the support of facilitators, participants will then have the opportunity to examine the key sources of opposition in their local context, consider possible points of intervention, and begin to map out their own Fight the Right strategy.
Speakers (click to view): Cole Parke, Erin Matson, Pamela Merritt

How to Fight the Right

Speakers

Cole Parke

Cole Parke has degrees in theology and conflict transformation, and has been working at the intersections of faith, gender, and sexuality as an activist, organizer, and scholar for more than a decade. Their research and writing examines the infrastructure, mechanisms, strategies, and effects of the Religious Right on LGBTQ people and reproductive rights, both domestically and internationally, always with an eye toward collective liberation.

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Erin Matson

Erin Matson is co-founder and co-director of Reproaction, a direct action group formed to increase access to abortion and advance reproductive justice. She lives in Arlington, Virginia.

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Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

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Not Just Women: Changing Our Language for a Trans Inclusive Movement
This interactive workshop is for cisgender (non-transgender) folks who wish to invest in a more trans inclusive reproductive justice movement. Let's learn together by engaging in dialogue after gaining the basic tips and tools on language and the experiences of trans bodies in the movement. This space is intended to be a learning space to get your questions answered and challenge each other to hold our communities accountable for bringing the valuable voices of trans folks to the forefront.
Speakers (click to view): NikoTiare

Not Just Women: Changing Our Language for a Trans Inclusive Movement

Speakers

NikoTiare

NikoTiare is a shapeshifting queer of color currently based in Pomona, CA. Niko's work currently centers on facilitating support groups for trans students. At the core of their work, Niko aims to make theoretical models of identity development accessible through empowering individuals to share knowledge and experiences with each other. Niko believes a healthy, sustainable community begins with attempting to understand ourselves and each other.

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Organizing for Sexual and Reproductive Justice in NYC: Engaging Community to Transform Public Institutions
A reproductive justice revolution is happening in New York City: a municipal agency (the nation’s largest health department) is working to adopt the principles of reproductive justice, guided by the Sexual and Reproductive Justice Community Engagement Group (CEG) comprised of over 50 nonprofit organizations, community leaders, activists, and academics. The purpose of this workshop is to 1) provide an overview of the CEG and its approach to incorporate a sexual and reproductive justice framework into the work of the NYC Health Department, 2) reflect on the CEG process and share successes, challenges, and lessons learned to date, and 3) facilitate a discussion around opportunities for communities to engage government institutions in order to forge partnerships that drive institutional transformation processes aligned with sexual and reproductive Justice. This workshop is offered in the spirit of open sharing and honest self-reflection, in hopes that others will be inspired to carry seeds of this idea across the nation.
Speakers (click to view): Nicole JeanBaptiste, Kaleb Oliver Dornheim, Allyna Steinberg, Lynn Roberts, PhD, Farah Diaz-Tello

Organizing for Sexual and Reproductive Justice in NYC: Engaging Community to Transform Public Institutions

Speakers

Nicole JeanBaptiste

Nicole JeanBaptiste is the creator and lead doula of NYC-based Sésé Doula Services. Currently a Birth Justice Project Coordinator consultant with the NYC Department of Health’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Unit, Nicole works directly with community members from across NYC to advocate for birth justice. Nicole also teaches a community-based yoga class once a week in the South Bronx.

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Kaleb Oliver Dornheim

Kaleb Dornheim is 25, poor, trans/nonbinary, queer, mentally ill, Baltimore and Hudson Valley grounded, has their Masters in Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies concentrating in Trans Studies Education, and works at GMHC as a Sexual and Reproductive Advocate for TGNC folks. When they aren't working or doing activism, they like being around farm animals, plants, and engaging in Kardashian Discourse.

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Allyna Steinberg

Allyna Steinberg became active in promoting sexual health after losing her uncle to AIDS in the early 1990s. Currently at the NYC Health Department, she co-leads health campaigns with reproductive justice advocates and diverse centered communities, organizes internally for Race to Justice, and teaches mindfulness and movement as a certified Alexander Technique teacher (addressing the role the body plays in healing from stress and trauma).

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Lynn Roberts, PhD

Lynn Roberts is an assistant professor in the Department of Community Health and Social Sciences at the CUNY School of Public Health. Prior to joining CUNY, she oversaw the development, implementation, and evaluation of several prevention programs for women and youth in NYC. Dr. Roberts’ current activism and scholarship examines the intersections of race, class, and gender in adolescent dating relationships, juvenile justice, and reproductive health policies, as well as the impact of models of collaborative inquiry and teaching on civic and political engagement. She is co-editor and contributing author of the anthology Radical Reproductive Justice: Foundation, Theory, Practice, Critique (Feminist Press, 2017).

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Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah is a human rights attorney dedicated to the pursuit of reproductive justice, with a focus on dignity, self-determination, and freedom from violence and coercion in pregnancy and the full spectrum of pregnancy outcomes. She is Senior Counsel for the SIA Legal Team, and serves on the Board of All-Options.

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Our Communities Are Not Dumping Grounds: Environmental and Reproductive Justice
What role does pollution play in our reproductive lives? How have companies profited from exposing Black women to harmful toxins and hidden chemicals linked to cancer, infertility, birth defects, and other serious health problems through “feminine care” products? How does climate change exacerbate "natural" disasters, and why are people of color at the greatest risk of having their lives disrupted? This workshop will examine urgent environmental issues with a close look at the economic and racial inequities that disproportionately impact communities of color and fenceline communities. From building resiliency and political power in fenceline communities to fighting back against toxic assault and reclaiming our right to safe products, it’s time for reproductive justice advocates to invest deeply in environmental justice!
Speakers (click to view): Nourbese Flint, Sarada Tangirala, Elisabeth Lamar

Our Communities Are Not Dumping Grounds: Environmental and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Nourbese Flint

Nourbese Flint is a blerd with a background in reproductive justice, journalism, all things X-Men and Batman related, matte lipsticks, Bob's Burgers, and Star Trek. She is currently working at Black Women for Wellness and Black Women for Wellness Project where she directs policy, RJ programs, civic engagement, graphic design, and keeping markers and crayons organized.

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Sarada Tangirala

Sarada Tangirala leads corporate campaigns aimed at eliminating toxic chemicals from products that impact women's health and our communities. Before that, she led market-based change efforts at the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics and conducted strategic corporate research for environmental justice campaigns at the DataCenter. She holds a master's in public policy from Oregon State University and a BA in sociology from UC Davis.

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Elisabeth Lamar

Elisabeth Lamar has advocated for safe and legal abortion since the age of 14. Her very first job was as a peer educator for Planned Parenthood where she helped organize a teen conference. Elisabeth holds a degree in Womxn's Studies and has served as a Sierra Club volunteer for the past five years.

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Reproductive Justice & State Legislative Abortion Trends: A Discussion on Innovative Intersectional Strategies
Access to abortion care is a reproductive justice issue. Communities of color, immigrant communities, women, girls, and trans and gender non-conforming folks are all affected by appalling and ever-evolving anti-abortion laws in states across the country. These laws, written mostly by cis white men, are meant to target the most marginalized communities. Learning from the reproductive justice framework, presenters will provide an overview of legislative trends, put abortion restrictions in a demographic context, and discuss proactive strategies to connect with attendees about their experiences at the local and state levels by utilizing storytelling and small group work. Attendees will explore intersections between abortion rights, racial justice, economic justice, gender justice, and immigrant rights to gain a comprehensive understanding of abortion issues in the country today. Presenters will highlight how recent developments in abortion legislation impact marginalized communities' ability to access abortion care and other necessary reproductive health services.
Speakers (click to view): Bethany Van Kampen, Lizamarie Mohammed, Nimra J. Chowdhry

Reproductive Justice & State Legislative Abortion Trends: A Discussion on Innovative Intersectional Strategies

Speakers

Bethany Van Kampen

Bethany Van Kampen serves as the Policy Analyst at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, where she is responsible for the abortion access and affordability portfolio. Bethany leads the federal policy work and supports the needs of the Latina Advocacy Networks (LANs) on issues related to abortion access and affordability. Prior to joining NLIRH as Policy Analyst, Bethany was a Women’s Policy Inc. legislative fellow in the office of Senator Barbara Boxer. Bethany received her law degree and Master of Social Work from Tulane University where she co-founded and served as President of the Tulane Law Students for Reproductive Justice and was a member of the Law & Sexuality Journal and the Tulane Domestic Violence Law Clinic. While in graduate school, Bethany also served as a board member of the New Orleans Abortion Fund, as well as a founding member of the Louisiana Coalition for Reproductive Freedom and the Louisiana Judicial Bypass Project. She received her BA in Psychology from Tufts University.

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Lizamarie Mohammed

Lizamarie Mohammed is the State Issues Manager at the Guttmacher Institute. She is responsible for analyzing legislative, regulatory, and judicial actions on reproductive health issues, tracking state policy developments, and monitoring state trends across the country. Before joining the Institute, Lizamarie worked on state policy issues for Catholics for Choice. She graduated from Skidmore College and earned her JD from Seattle University School of Law.

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Nimra J. Chowdhry

Nimra J. Chowdhry is the State Legislative Fellow at the Center for Reproductive Rights. Prior to her work at the Center, Nimra was a Policy Analyst and Senior If/When/How Fellow with Advocates for Youth where her work focused on reproductive justice for Muslim and immigrant youth. Nimra also worked as an If/When/How Fellow at NAPAWF where she advanced policies for the Asian American community. A proud Pakistani-Texan, Nimra holds a JD and a master’s certificate in Women and Gender Studies (WGS) from the University of Houston and a BA in Government and WGS from the University of Texas at Austin.

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Reproductive Justice 101
Reproductive justice was coined in 1994 by Women of African Descent for Reproductive Justice, a group of Black women who recognized that the white-led women's rights movement was not prioritizing issues critical to women of color, and that we must represent our own communities. This workshop will discuss some of the history of RJ as well as give participants a chance to express their RJ stories. The workshop also involves understanding what's at stake for folk who are often left out of reproductive justice considerations, such as trans women and trans non-binary folks.
Speakers (click to view): Ash Williams, Monica Simpson

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers

Ash Williams

Ash Williams is a trans non-binary femme from Fayetteville, NC. As a Black Lives Matter organizer, Ash has educated the NC community about state-sanctioned violence as it relates to trans and queer people of color. Since 2013, this work has included leading rapid response actions, building solidarity and coalitions across differences, developing press strategies, designing campaigns, educating and mobilizing people on social media, and training other organizers. Ash is a 2016 Human Rights Advocacy Fellow in Residence and Ignite NC Fellow (working against voter suppression), and won the Cyrus M. Johnson Award for Peace and Social Justice in 2014 and the Charlotte Pride Young Catalyst Award in 2016. They hold a master's in Ethics and Applied Philosophy and a bachelor's in Philosophy from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Ash is also a dancer, choreographer, and dance teacher.

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Monica Simpson

Monica is the Executive Director of SisterSong: Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. Monica has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, racism and intolerance and is deeply invested in southern movement building. Because of her “artivism” Monica was named as a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine and chosen as one of Advocate Magazine’s 40 under 40 leaders.

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Survivor Justice & #MeToo: Building Power to End Sexual Violence and Lead Change for Survivors
We stand at a collective tipping point. We exist at the intersection of the revolutionary #MeToo movement, transforming accountability, solidarity, healing, and justice for survivors, and the Trump administration’s attacks on vital rights and protections for survivors and marginalized people. Now more than ever, we need a powerful, intersectional, and informed survivor justice movement. In this interactive workshop, the facilitator will lead a direct action organizing training tailored to activists and advocates working against sexual, intimate partner, and gender-based violence at the campus and grassroots community level. We will explore your rights, campus and federal policies, the administration’s actions, the possibilities of #MeToo, and the effectiveness of direct action. Using trauma-informed scenarios, participants will learn key tools to mobilize their own community or organization, create and sustain a successful campaign, hold decision-makers accountable, build power, and win real change for survivors. Together, we can advance the movement for survivors and build the future we want to live in. Open to folks of all a/genders and a/sexualities. Open to survivors and allies at all levels of engagement in this work.
Speakers (click to view): Priya Ghosh

Survivor Justice & #MeToo: Building Power to End Sexual Violence and Lead Change for Survivors

Speakers

Priya Ghosh

Priya Ghosh is a survivor activist, community organizer, and educational trainer with a background in movement building, direct action campaigns, and advocacy for survivors of sexual, intimate partner, and gender-based violence. Priya is the Founding Director of the Survivor Justice Project, a grassroots organization empowering and training people to end violence and lead change for survivors. As the former president of CERC at UMass Amherst, she led a successful 2 year campaign for the institution of a Survivor’s Bill of Rights to expand and protect Title IX rights. Priya is deeply invested in the collective building of a transformative, intersectional movement for survivors. Priya currently works at Safe Passage and lives and organizes in the Pioneer Valley.

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When Sex Trafficking Is Sensationalized: Criminalizing Working Together
The goal of our workshop is to provide an understanding of sex work and sex trafficking, how they are different, and how, in many states, this distinction is not made. We will discuss the legal definitions and explore how participants understand sex trafficking. Using Alaska as a case study, we will explore the differences between these federal and state laws. We will share how these definitions disproportionately impact the lives of women of color and their families. We will also explain that some people with these charges must register as sex offenders, which further impacts their lives upon their release. We will brainstorm what common elements are important to make sex work safe without causing sex work to be confused as sex trafficking. Our presentation includes a short documentary that shares the stories of individual "sex traffickers" who discuss their lives and experiences prior to and as a result of these charges and incarceration.
Speakers (click to view): Jill McCracken, Amber Batts

When Sex Trafficking Is Sensationalized: Criminalizing Working Together

Speakers

Jill McCracken

Dr. Jill McCracken is an Associate Professor of Rhetoric at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg and the Co-Founder/Co-Director of Sex Workers Outreach Project (SWOP) Behind Bars, an organization that provides community support for incarcerated sex workers and connects incarcerated sex workers in U.S. prisons and jails to the sex worker rights movement. Her primary areas of research focus on sex work and trafficking in the sex industry, the impact of sexuality education on marginalized communities, and women who are incarcerated.

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Amber Batts

Sex worker deemed sex trafficker from Alaska, where consensual sex workers organized together for safety and security is sex trafficking according to legislation. In 2014 I was charged for sex trafficking due to operating a progressive coalition business featuring sex workers. I was sentenced to 5.5 years and currently I am on discretionary parole.

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Saturday Session 1: 1:15PM - 2:45PM

A Seat At The Table: Exploring Disruptive Leadership with a Solange Soundtrack
Love to work to a soundtrack? Interested in strategies that can transform space to be more inclusive? So are we. Solange created the perfect soundtrack for organizational change. We are weary, ready to share our magik, and MAD. Joining the fight for Reproductive Justice can mean that you are surrounded by Q/T/ GNC/POC or it can mean knocking down the barriers of white supremacy in a "feminist" organization, collective, or group. How can we live our values, and make actions that propel the RJ movement forward? These are large questions and we want to think them through with you and provide some strategies, games, and tactics to battle white supremacy and structures that organizations lean on to support it. Also if you just want an excuse to dialogue about " A Seat at the Table," we can do that too! This session is Part I of a two-part workshop series and will be followed by Part II: "No Milk For Your Cookies: A Critical Look At White Allyship In The RJ Movement." Join us for one or both sessions!
Speakers (click to view): Erin Grant, Randi Gregory, Alana Belle, Kris Keen

A Seat At The Table: Exploring Disruptive Leadership with a Solange Soundtrack

Speakers

Randi Gregory

Randi has been organizing on electoral, union, and issue based campaigns for the last 8 years. She is dedicated to bringing grassroots organizing and public policy to marginalized communities, specifically LGBTQIA youth of color. She previously worked for SEIU and NARAL Pro Choice Ohio as well as various state Democratic parties as a field director. Currently Randi serves as the Director of Programs for SPARK Reproductive Justice Now, where she is responsible for their field and policy work.

Alana Belle

Alana has been involved in various social justice movements for a few years; she has influenced change in regards to local politics, racial justice, economic justice, and most recently, reproductive justice. The current Community Organizer for New Voices for Reproductive Justice - Cleveland, Alana welcomes every opportunity to engage people in the RJ movement.

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Kris Keen

Over the past 7 years Kris has dedicated their time to various nonprofit arts and culture and issue-based campaigns to support working class youth of color in Philadelphia. For the past two years Kris worked as a youth organizer servicing Black and Brown youth who were pushed out of and disinvested in by traditional public schools of Philadelphia. Kris is now using that experience to influence their work as a community organizer dedicated to developing Black women, fems, and girls in partnership with LGBTQIA organizations to achieve health and wellness through centering a reproductive justice framework.

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Abortion Access: Overcoming Barriers and Removing Obstacles
Efforts to restrict access to safe and legal abortion persist, disproportionately affecting the most marginalized people in our society and worldwide. Join us to hear from a distinguished panel of advocates and providers working at the frontlines in hostile climates to discuss the current landscape of (in)access to abortion care. Panelists will talk about current barriers to accessing care and discuss multi-pronged strategies to reduce stigma, add nuance to the conversation about abortion, and fight back against the criminalization of self-induced abortion.
Speakers (click to view): Farah Diaz-Tello, Yashica Robinson, MD, Bhavik Kumar, MD, MPH, Marlene Gerber Fried

Abortion Access: Overcoming Barriers and Removing Obstacles

Speakers

Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah is a human rights attorney dedicated to the pursuit of reproductive justice, with a focus on dignity, self-determination, and freedom from violence and coercion in pregnancy and the full spectrum of pregnancy outcomes. She is Senior Counsel for the SIA Legal Team, and serves on the Board of All-Options.

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Yashica Robinson, MD

Dr. Yashica Robinson is the medical director of Alabama Women’s Center for Reproductive Alternatives. She is the primary provider of second trimester abortion care in Alabama, while running a busy solo OBGYN practice. Robinson received her Doctor of Medicine from Morehouse School of Medicine. She completed her internship and residency training in Obstetrics and Gynecology at University of Alabama, Birmingham. She is a comprehensive women’s health specialist.

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Bhavik Kumar, MD, MPH

Bhavik currently works as an abortion provider in Texas and serves as the medical director for the four Whole Woman's Health clinics in Texas. He completed his residency and fellowship training at Albert Einstein COM in Bronx, NY and returned to his home state afterwards. He is public about his work with an aim to reduce abortion stigma and increase visibility of abortion providers.

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Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a scholar and long-time advocate for abortion access and reproductive justice. She is Professor of Philosophy at Hampshire College and Faculty Director of CLPP. She serves on the board of the Abortion Rights Fund of Western MA and Our Bodies Ourselves, is a consultant to Women Help Women, and is currently a Global Scholar at the O’Neill Institute at Georgetown Law School.

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Beyond Know Your Rights: The Spectrum of State Violence on Immigrant Communities
This workshop will raise awareness of the challenges that undocumented and mixed-status families face under the Trump administration beyond "Good/Bad Immigrant" rhetoric. Policies that restrict communities of immigrants' ability to live, work, and love with dignity have physical as well as psychological effects on families; for this reason, the immigrant and reproductive justice movements are one and the same. In addition to reflecting on some of the tactics used to police poor immigrant communities of color, participants will work in small groups to better understand the timeline of racist anti-immigrant policies that are already in place. This conversation will center and affirm the resistance and experiences of individuals from the communities directly affected by this violence, especially those living at the most vulnerable intersections of our society, but we invite individuals who work directly with these communities to equip themselves with this critical knowledge.
Speakers (click to view): Janet Perez Valle, Jenifer Guzman, Kelly Tellez

Beyond Know Your Rights: The Spectrum of State Violence on Immigrant Communities

Speakers

Janet Perez Valle

Janet Perez Valle is the Volunteer Coordinator and Community Organizer for Mixteca Organization located in Brooklyn, New York. As a directly impacted person, her work in immigration and with undocumented communities has inspired her to continue advocating and organizing in both her work and personal life.

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Jenifer Guzman

Jenifer Guzman is a junior in college majoring in psychology and political science, and planning on pursuing a career as a lawyer. She is a self-proclaimed feminist advocating for immigration and reproductive health rights.

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Kelly Tellez

Kelly Tellez is a queer femme of Mexican descent from Brooklyn, the child of working class immigrants, and a first generation college graduate. Since graduating, Kelly has been supporting her community as an Sadie Nash ELLA fellow at Mixteca Organization and as an abortion doula with the NY Doula Project.

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Black and Jewish Liberation Practices in the Pro-Choice Movement
There is a rich, imperfect history between Black and Jewish communities in the United States. When it comes to reproductive justice, both Black and Jewish communities have factions within that fight female bodily autonomy and are anti-choice. At the same time, Black and Jewish communities have been faced with horrible systems of oppression by white supremacists that subjected them to forced sterilization and other experimentation against their wills. Both communities have roots in the social justice movement, both out of necessity and desire. Yet we are not immune to our own conflicts: there exists in the Jewish community the ugly specter of racism, and in the Black community, there is anti-Semitism. Many of us are working on these festering problems within our own communities, particularly for those who straddle both worlds. We believe that the Black and Jewish communities are strong enough and principled enough, and have enough shared history and love for one another to overcome these painful hurdles in order to build on our bonds and break through any chains that seek to hold us down. The white cis heteronormative has used us, and used us against one another, and it needs to end. Now. Yesterday. Centuries ago. Black and Jewish communities will, do, and should always strive to work together to combat white supremacy in the anti-choice movement and the feminist movement. This panel is suitable for anyone. It centers around Black and Jewish voices; however, people from all walks of life are welcome and highly encouraged to participate. This is a traditional panel that will have space for audience/presenter interaction.
Speakers (click to view): Aliza (uh-LEE-zuh) Worthington, Avital Norman Nathman, Jasmine Banks, Elisha Nain

Black and Jewish Liberation Practices in the Pro-Choice Movement

Speakers

Aliza (uh-LEE-zuh) Worthington

Aliza Worthington is a writer, editor, and activist. She tries not to be problematic white lady, does clinic defense, and moderates discussions in large groups on Facebook. She is a four-time BlogHer Voices of the Year award recipient (2013, 2015, 2016, 2017). You can find her writing on her blog, The Worthington Post, and at The Broad Side, Purple Clover, Kveller, and Salon.

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Avital Norman Nathman

Avital Norman Nathman is an editor for GrokNation and a freelance writer who writes about everything from parenting to pot and pop culture. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, VICE, Cosmopolitan, Rolling Stone, and more. Find her tweeting at @TheMamafesto.

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Jasmine Banks

Jasmine is a queer Black feminist, a digital campaigner, community organizer, and licensed therapist.

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Elisha Nain

Elisha Nain is a writer, producer, and singer living in Savannah, GA. She believes her multi-ethnic family, musical-loving Grandma Susan, and a near-death experience in Paris drove her to write. Nain is currently writing a narrative entitled, "How to be a Jewish Afro-Latina from Virginia."

Groups audience: 

Blood, Memories and Other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice
Memories are carried between generations in many different ways. Many of us — cultural workers, full spectrum birth workers and reproductive justice organizers of color — understand the importance to (re)learn and (re)member traditional medicine as we work towards body literacy, autonomy, and freedom. Menstruation can be a tool to better understand our bodies, track natural cycles, control fertility, and also learn about cultural and familial traditions around menstruation. In this session, we will talk about the importance of cultural preservation and menstrual education in reproductive justice, and share knowledge and experiences around holistic menstrual care. This is a closed space for people of color.
Speakers (click to view): Loba, NikoTiare

Blood, Memories and Other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Loba

La Loba Loca is a TortaQueer Feminista Abortista, Chocolla, Andina, South American migrant, artist, researcher, writer, handpoke tattooist, full spectrum companion/doula, aspiring midwife student, seed-saver, gardener, and yerbetera. Loba is currently based in Los Angeles, CA but constantly travels across Turtle Island and Abya Yala to facilitate shares and circles on herbalism, plant relations, social justice, healing justice, and autonomous health. In the past years, Loba has been delving into creating educational material and providing consulations/comadreo online to ensure the work is accessible to all. Loba is invested on disseminating information with the hope that self-knowledge and (re)cognition of abuelita knowledge will create a future where we can depend on ourselves and communities.

Groups audience: 

NikoTiare

NikoTiare is a shapeshifting queer of color currently based in Pomona, CA. Niko's work currently centers on facilitating support groups for trans students. At the core of their work, Niko aims to make theoretical models of identity development accessible through empowering individuals to share knowledge and experiences with each other. Niko believes a healthy, sustainable community begins with attempting to understand ourselves and each other.

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Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop
A common perception of the Manual Vacuum Aspiration (MVA) abortion is that the procedure is scary, complicated, and intense. The purpose of this Papaya workshop is to debunk this myth through education and hands-on activities for a non-clinical audience. Using papayas as uterine models, participants will be introduced and perform their own MVA abortion. In addition to physically practicing the procedure, the audience will also learn and role play patient-centered language. This workshop is an excellent way to bridge the gap between abortion providers and abortion advocates with no clinical experience. By gaining a comprehensive understanding of the actual medical procedure, audiences will be better informed and equipped as abortion activists and advocates. Participants will then take their newfound knowledge to help demystify abortion in their organizations and broader communities.
Speakers (click to view): Laura Riker, Hannah Biederman, Natalie Kopke

Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop

Speakers

Laura Riker

Laura is the Senior Program Manager at the Reproductive Health Access Project, where she organizes primary care clinicians from across the country to work together to expand access to comprehensive reproductive health care in primary care. Laura is a social worker with a background in Women’s Studies, and has previously worked in community mental health and interpersonal violence prevention. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Hannah Biederman

Hannah is a reproductive health care fellow at the Cambridge Health Alliance in Massachusetts. She attended the Mt. Sinai Beth Israel Family Medicine Residency in New York, NY.

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Natalie Kopke

Natalie’s passion for reproductive justice is fueled by her past and current work with organizations striving to advance reproductive and sexual rights at the local, national, and international level. Outside of the Reproductive Health Access Project (RHAP), Natalie sits on the Young Women of Color Advisory Council by Advocates for Youth and is a Spanish case manager with the New York Abortion Access Fund. She plans to pursue graduate studies in public health policy.

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Disability Justice 101
Disability justice is a multi-issue framework inextricably linked to our fights for reproductive, racial, gender, and economic justice, and queer and trans liberation. Disabled and chronically ill people have made critical interventions in our movement at every level, from informing how and why we create accessible spaces to reckoning with the reproductive rights movement's attachment to eugenics and ableism as political strategies. Join activist Dorian Taylor for an introduction to disability justice and exploration of its current and historical connections to reproductive health, rights, and justice work.
Speakers (click to view): Dorian Taylor

Disability Justice 101

Speakers

Dorian Taylor

Dorian Taylor is a gender nonbinary adaptive athlete for the U.S. paracanoe team. Paralyzed through police violence, autistic and living with lupus, they have survived homelessness, childhood institutionalization, and many other systemic forms of abuse. They now use those life experiences to continue to grow and shape the world around them in hopes to create social change.

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Doctor, Lawyer, or Activist? Navigating Cultural/Familial Expectations as “First” Generation
This identity caucus seeks to provide a safe space for first-generation immigrants, children of immigrants, and first-generation college students of color to discuss their experiences with navigating activism, especially around reproductive justice, with cultural expectations. There are certain expectations for children of immigrants or first-generation students of color: that when a family has made sacrifices, the child must do “better” or climb the economic ladder of success. We are creating this space as two individuals who struggle to explain our reproductive justice work to our families, and welcome others with similar experiences to join us for a facilitated discussion and strategy sharing session. This identity caucus will be a closed space for to those who self-identify as children of immigrants, immigrants, or first-generation students of color.
Speakers (click to view): Nicole Villacrés-Reyes, Sonia Mohammadzadah

Doctor, Lawyer, or Activist? Navigating Cultural/Familial Expectations as “First” Generation

Speakers

Nicole Villacrés-Reyes

Nicole Villacrés- Reyes is a senior at Mount Holyoke College in Western Massachusetts. She is a first-generation U.S. college student and an immigrant from Ecuador. She is a proud RRASC alum and believes the experience solidified her commitment to reproductive justice. Her current projects includes working on the accessibility of affordable housing in Springfield, MA.

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Sonia Mohammadzadah

Sonia Mohammadzadah is a senior English major and Anthropology minor at Mount Holyoke College, hailing from Minneapolis, Minnesota. She is pursuing a 5 College Certificate in Reproductive Health, Rights, and Justice. Her academic interests include narrative non-fiction, identity politics, intersectional feminism, and reproductive liberation. Sonia is a RRASC alum, and was a communications intern with Advocates for Youth in Washington D.C. last summer.

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Muslims and Reproductive Justice: Empowering Our Community Through Dismantling Stereotypes
Submissive. Oppressed. Conservative. Words consistently used to describe Muslim women in the age of mass Islamophobia. HEART Women and Girls will use a reproductive justice framework to discuss how stereotypes influence the lived experiences of Muslim people, deconstruct the Muslim American community, and present ways to empower (ourselves or others who are) Muslim survivors of sexual violence in the current age of Islamophobia.
Speakers (click to view): Sadia Arshad

Muslims and Reproductive Justice: Empowering Our Community Through Dismantling Stereotypes

Speakers

Sadia Arshad

Sadia Arshad is a virtual educator with HEART Women and Girls. Born and raised in Miami, studied up in Boston, and enjoying Atlanta, she is a public health reproductive justice nerd, focused on South Asian and Muslim community health needs.

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Not Our Burden: Young Parent Stigma and Intergenerational Impact
Four young mamas and our children will hold a multigenerational discussion on what it means to be a young mom and the child of a teen mom in the United States today. From being framed as public health issues and economic burdens to being criticized for our reproductive choices, our families face isolation, discrimination, and harmful stigmas. In this session, we will break down and unpack the history of young parent stigma, explain how seven young moms utilized new tech to drive policy change and culture shift, and share actionable steps people can take to support our restoration of power. Bring your questions, meet our family, and join us for this unique and special opportunity to celebrate young families.
Speakers (click to view): Christina Marie Martinez, Natasha Vianna, Marylouise Kuti, Amy Lopez

Not Our Burden: Young Parent Stigma and Intergenerational Impact

Speakers

Marylouise Kuti

Marylouise has worked to support young parents and their families in New Mexico and across the nation in breaking down barriers to accessing education, health care and other resources and supports.

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Amy Lopez

Amy Lopez is a multimedia journalist based in Los Angeles who has written for FutMexNation and contributed to #NoTeenShame. As a young mom, she aspires to help eliminate the stigma surrounding teen parenting.
Power, Pleasure, Profit: Radical Visions of Consent from Young Feminists
Join a panel of sex worker activists, sex educators, anti-rape advocates, and others to discuss how young feminists are building radical new definitions of consent and communication! This will be a participatory panel; audience members will be invited to reflect on and discuss their own definitions of consent. The ways we talk about sex are changing rapidly, and young voices are playing a central role in this evolving dialogue. Traditional definitions of consent — a concept originally borrowed from criminal law — are receiving tough criticism and being boldly reimagined. Sexual violence activists are pushing for legal requirements that go beyond consent; sex educators are reframing conversations about consent as pleasure-oriented instead of violence-avoidant; and sex workers are demanding recognition as consenting participants in a legitimate form of labor. We will explore questions that shape our current practices of consent, and consider alternative visions for cultural and legal definitions of sexual communication.
Speakers (click to view): Haylin Belay, Jenna Torres, Zoe Ridolfi-Starr, Sage Carson

Power, Pleasure, Profit: Radical Visions of Consent from Young Feminists

Speakers

Haylin Belay

With nearly a decade of hands-on experience teaching and developing sexual health education programming for youth and adults, Haylin Belay believes all people — regardless of age, orientation, identity, ability, or libido — deserve an integrated sex life and the safe pursuit of pleasure. She specializes in providing medically accurate information alongside the social, emotional, and cultural competencies needed to put that information to use.

Groups audience: 

Jenna Torres

Jenna Torres is a community advocate and human rights supporter. She is a published author, spoken word artist, entrepreneur, and above all a proud mother to three beautiful children! She believes people have agency to make the best decisions possible in order to survive. She defends them and works with communities to build realistic solutions to real life problems like violence, poverty, and discrimination. Jenna’s vision is to empower communities often overlooked and overcriminalized.

Groups audience: 

Zoe Ridolfi-Starr

Zoe is an advocate for gender equity and a fair legal system in New York. She serves on the Sex Education Alliance of NYC as the co-chair of policy. Previously, Zoe ran a youth advocacy program focused homelessness and the justice system, and served as Deputy Director of Know Your IX, where she trained student activists and led legislative advocacy efforts to address gender violence on campus. Her writing on sex and justice has been published in the Yale Law Journal, New York Daily News, ReWire, and other outlets.

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Queering Reproductive Justice: Strength In Our Differences
Who we are and what we fight for are integrally connected, and the need to acknowledge and organize around our full selves is reinforced every day of the Trump Administration. Now more than ever, when the attacks seem relentless, we must ground ourselves firmly in a shared vision for intersectional base-building across the reproductive justice movement, recognizing that #MeToo is a queer issue; ableism is a repro justice issue; transphobia is a human rights issue; Islamophobia is a racial justice issue; and ultimately, we're all in this together. How do we affirm a truly queer analysis and approach to liberation that is radically inclusive? Come be a part of the conversation alongside writers, researchers, and activists working at the intersections of community care and holistic healing, black communities and reproductive health, transformative justice, research activism, body liberation, and LGBTQI freedom.
Speakers (click to view): Cole Parke, Renae Taylor, Joy Messinger, Brienne Colston

Queering Reproductive Justice: Strength In Our Differences

Speakers

Cole Parke

Cole Parke has degrees in theology and conflict transformation, and has been working at the intersections of faith, gender, and sexuality as an activist, organizer, and scholar for more than a decade. Their research and writing examines the infrastructure, mechanisms, strategies, and effects of the Religious Right on LGBTQ people and reproductive rights, both domestically and internationally, always with an eye toward collective liberation.

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Renae Taylor

Renae Taylor is a 43 year old Non-Binary Trans person located in Memphis, TN. Renae is involved in many social and racial justice organizations. Renae is also a member of their local HIV Care and Prevention Planning Group.

Groups audience: 

Joy Messinger

Joy Messinger is a queer, disabled, femme organizer of spreadsheets, funding, and people to build sustainability, healing, wellness, and power for reproductive justice, queer and trans liberation, and disabled, migrant, and POC communities. As Third Wave Fund's Program Officer, she oversees Third Wave's rapid response, multi-year general support, and capacity building grantmaking and supports its cross-sector philanthropic advocacy.

Groups audience: 

Brienne Colston

Brienne Colston is a Black queer feminist youth worker, facilitator, and community organizer hailing from the South Bronx. Colston is the founder of Brown Girl Recovery, a collective dedicated to prioritizing healing justice and providing community spaces to womxn of color in the Bronx and other uptown areas through social justice programming and events. A graduate of Lawrence University with degrees in Gender Studies and History, Colston found her passion in small town grassroots organizing and resistance work. In addition to working with BGR, Colston serves as a racial justice & political education facilitator for an array of small community-based organizations including the Audre Lorde Project, and directs their first-ever queer/trans/non-binary POC choir! She has facilitated healing justice-based workshops and community gatherings at institutions such as the United Nations, the Posse Foundation, Sadie Nash Leadership Project, Black Women's Blueprint, and Spelman College. A self-described "fatBlackSUPERwomxn," Colston is eager to hold space for dope Black and Brown femmes everywhere!

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Reproductive Justice in the Age of Mass Incarceration
What does reproductive (in)justice look like behind bars? How are certain communities disproportionately impacted by policing and incarceration? And how can we hold onto a dream of abolition while making real, tangible changes in the lives of those most impacted by mass incarceration? Focusing on the lived experiences of women, trans, and gender non-conforming people in prisons and jails, this session will expand participants' understanding of how sexism, racism, classism, and gender-based violence underpin systems of mass incarceration. Speakers will discuss innovative organizing models for mobilizing both inside and outside of the prison system for justice for those who are currently or formerly incarcerated and their families.
Speakers (click to view): Nia Weeks, Lill Hewko, Jill McCracken

Reproductive Justice in the Age of Mass Incarceration

Speakers

Nia Weeks

Nia Weeks the director of Policy and Advocacy at Women With A Vision, located in New Orleans, Louisiana. She is a native of New Orleans, and has spent years fighting for the rights of women, children, and families. As a former public defender and the inaugural Director of Policy and Advocacy for WWAV, her goals for the department is to cover not only broad, national trends, but also take a specific deep dive into the conditions of all Black women.

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Lill Hewko

Lill Hewko, a queer, trans nonbinary, mixed-Latinx from a working-class background, is a prison abolitionist and reproductive justice lawyer focusing on race, gender, child welfare, incarceration, and healing. Lill co-founded the Incarcerated Parents Project and the Incarcerated Mothers Advocacy Project, and is a founding board member of Surge Reproductive Justice. Lill is an attorney at the Transgender Law Center and works with QTPOC Birthwerq Project.

Groups audience: 

Jill McCracken

Dr. Jill McCracken is an Associate Professor of Rhetoric at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg and the Co-Founder/Co-Director of Sex Workers Outreach Project (SWOP) Behind Bars, an organization that provides community support for incarcerated sex workers and connects incarcerated sex workers in U.S. prisons and jails to the sex worker rights movement. Her primary areas of research focus on sex work and trafficking in the sex industry, the impact of sexuality education on marginalized communities, and women who are incarcerated.

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Talking With Conservative Family and Friends About Abortion
It’s common to feel frustrated, angry, and/or drained by conversations with people we care about who hold deeply conservative views on reproductive health, especially abortion. The disconnection can be very painful, especially when it’s close family or friends. Often the differences involve religious beliefs, which can be particularly hard to negotiate. Often the sense of urgency and passion we feel is at odds with the reality that changing deeply held beliefs is an uncertain and often extremely slow process. In this interactive workshop, we will explore approaches and skills for having more productive conversations across ideological divides. We will review research on how liberals and conservatives construct morality differently, share experiences, and consider some new approaches. We will also examine different ways of defining success in these interactions. with the twin goals of reducing cultural stigma against abortion and maintaining (or maybe even improving) these potentially challenging relationships.
Speakers (click to view): Latishia James, M.Div., Madeline Blodgett, Rev. Rob Keithan

Talking With Conservative Family and Friends About Abortion

Speakers

Latishia James, M.Div.

Latishia James is a trauma-informed facilitator, counselor, and advocate with almost 10 years of experience in sexual and reproductive justice. After earning her Master of Divinity from Pacific School of Religion, Latishia began a consulting practice, where she supports survivors of religious and/or sexual trauma, facilitates workshops, and provides faith-based counseling to people making an array of reproductive decisions.

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Madeline Blodgett

Madeline Blodgett, MPH is a facilitative leader, researcher, and collaboration designer leveraging empathy, evidence, and human-centered design to create culture change.

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Rev. Rob Keithan

Rev. Rob Keithan is the Minister of Social Justice at All Souls Church Unitarian in Washington, DC. His passion is working for long-term culture change in ways that engage the complex issues of religion, race, morality, and reproductive health.

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Saturday Session 2: 3:15PM - 4:45PM

Building Student Power & Organizing for Reproductive Justice
This workshop will be a space for students to share skills, tools, strategies, and experiences related to organizing for reproductive justice on college campuses. Participants will leave with a communication network and a collaborative list of tangible strategies and tools for our organizing work. We will go back to our campuses with a stronger sense of our identities and of ways in which we can center womxn and people of color in our movements. We will also critically examine our own organizing work to ensure we are embodying the reproductive justice framework and centering the voices and lived experiences of those most impacted by reproductive injustices.
Speakers (click to view): Nargis Aslami, Namrata Jacob

Building Student Power & Organizing for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Nargis Aslami

Nargis is a 21 year old Afghan-American woman, majoring in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at UMass Amherst and pursuing the 5 College Reproductive Rights, Health, and Justice Certificate. She has been one of the Student Group Co-Coordinators for CLPP for the past two years. In this position, she plans and facilitates weekly meetings on topics of reproductive justice and intersecting social justice movements, and plays a key role in organizing CLPP's annual conference. She also works as a rape crisis counselor and a medical advocate for survivors of sexual assault. Nargis is just around the corner from graduating from UMass, and plans to attend law school within the next year or two to continue pursuing social justice work.

Groups audience: 

Namrata Jacob

Namrata Jacob is a reproductive justice activist, recent college graduate, diasporic South Asian gal, and strong believer that anything can be made into a themed party if one tries hard enough. Her work focuses on critically connecting the historical production of race and reproduction under U.S empire. Namrata has worked with a number of organizations and conferences, and CLPP is #1 in her heart.

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Bye Bye Fake Clinics: Using Direct Action to Target CPCs in Your Community
Crisis Pregnancy Centers (CPCs) — otherwise known as fake women's health centers (FWHCs) — threaten the health and safety of our communities by providing false and harmful information to those dealing with unintended pregnancies. Presenters from Reproaction, Advocates For Youth's 1 in 3 Campaign, and Lady Parts Justice will give examples of successful direct action campaigns, online and in the streets, so participants can spur change in their communities to shed light on the predatory tactics and goals of FWHCs, which are the subject of a Supreme Court case that will be decided later this spring.
Speakers (click to view): Shireen Rose Shakouri, Lorne Batman, Shomya Tripathy

Bye Bye Fake Clinics: Using Direct Action to Target CPCs in Your Community

Speakers

Shireen Rose Shakouri

Shireen is a proud DC voter and Campaign Lead at Reproaction. Formerly a Middle East/South Asia foreign policy analyst, she turned to reproductive justice work a year ago after spending years volunteering for pro-choice and sexual health causes in college (GWU '13) and thereafter. She is Iranian and Italian-American, and loves to cook those cuisines and almost everything else.

Groups audience: 

Lorne Batman

Lorne serves as the Online Community Manager at Lady Parts Justice League, a reproductive rights nonprofit that brings support to independent clinics across the U.S. and uses humor and pop culture to expose haters fighting to end abortion access. She is a graduate of Boston University and the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. Her favorite moment of all time was officiating her moms' wedding in 2015. #LoveWins

Groups audience: 

Shomya Tripathy

Shomya Tripathy is the Senior Manager of the Youth Activist Network at Advocates for Youth. Through the 1 in 3 Campaign, she works with young people around the country to challenge abortion stigma on their campuses and in their communities.

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Criminalized Bodies: State Violence in the 21st Century
Mass incarceration, surveillance, policing, environmental racism, and the criminalization of poverty are some of the violences imposed on communities of color by the state. How can — and do — our movements work to combat the realities of state-sanctioned violence, economic injustice, and racism? Join this panel of activists that have mobilized against state violence from Standing Rock to New York City's immigration courts to Louisiana’s “prison capital of the world.”
Speakers (click to view): Rage Kidvai, Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa, Pamela Merritt, Ashley Nicole McCray

Criminalized Bodies: State Violence in the 21st Century

Speakers

Rage Kidvai

Rage is a public defender in Brooklyn Criminal Defense practice of the Legal Aid Society. They also work with 5 Boro Defenders focusing on prosecutor accountability and immigration issues. Prior to this, Rage was an Equal Justice Works Fellow in the Sylvia Rivera Law Project’s Immigrant Defense Project. Rage is a graduate of CUNY Law School and Hampshire College.

Groups audience: 

Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa

Mwende “FreeQuency” Katwiwa is a 26 year old Kenyan freedom fighter, writer, and performer. Katwiwa is an internationally touring author, host, youth worker, social justice lecturer, teaching artist, and workshop leader who has spent her life at the intersection of arts, education, and activism. She works at Women With A Vision, Inc in New Orleans, is a member of BYP100, and is a proud auntie.

Groups audience: 

Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

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Ashley Nicole McCray

Ashley Nicole McCray is a grassroots indigenous organizer from the Oglala Lakota Nation and Absentee Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma. Ashley fights on behalf of indigenous liberation, racial justice, and the environment in Oklahoma and across Indian Country.

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De-colonial Dreams: a family roundtable on raising parents and kids with radical values
Many of us were raised either by a parent or a caregiver. Some of us were raised in the streets. How do children and young people, hopefully destined to become adults, learn collectivity, embody difference as joy, consent, boundaries and other radical ideas? How do parents build a foundation of decolonizing systems and concepts of power in an everyday way? What are helpful ways for parents to get in touch with their own feelings and internal biases when raising young people? What do kids teach parents about how to be better parents to themselves and to their kids? This session is not about telling you how to raise your children. It is a workshop to hear from kids, young people and their parent or caregivers about how they are building new or different ways of growing up to be autonomous, loving, discerning and that there are all kinds of people who are fat, disabled, queer and trans. It will be a playful roundtable of families so feel free to bring your kids, teenagers, or the young ones in your life that you are invested in.
Speakers (click to view): Jamarah Amani, Hadassah, Mahoro, Nalubaale and Mosiah, zahra alabanza, cassius and marley, Selena Velasco and Elijah, Carter Klenk-Morse, Saoirse and Rowan, Lucia Leandro Gimeno

De-colonial Dreams: a family roundtable on raising parents and kids with radical values

Speakers

Jamarah Amani, Hadassah, Mahoro, Nalubaale and Mosiah

Jamarah Amani is a community midwife and mother of four. Her mission is to do her part to build a movement for birth justice locally, nationally and globally. A community organizer from the age of 16, Jamarah has worked with several organizations across the United States, the Caribbean, and in Africa on various public health issues. She is currently the director of Southern Birth Justice Network, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.

Groups audience: 

zahra alabanza, cassius and marley

Zahra is a life enthusiast. She is a mother, organizer, creative, and adventurer. A project starting, wandering, overlover and outdoor junkie. She utilizes space curation, outdoor adventure, food justice, yoga(ing), and being a creative as the root of her community organizing efforts to enhance the quality of life among Black folk. Her work centers Black women and children and meets at the intersection of justice, living in one's values, healing, quality of life and Black Liberation. She is humbly a co-visionary of the Anna Julia Cooper Learning and Liberation Center where her insights and skills further the development of liberatory living and learning spaces. Currently she serves as the Conference Organizer for the Money for Our Movements National Conference, Co-Founder of Black Freedom Outfitters, and Red, Bike and Green-Atlanta. Cassius is the eldest of the #cassiusandmarley brother duo. He uses cooking, his artistic abilities, and humor to make people happy. He enjoys playing basketball and riding his penny board. In his spare time he likes planting garlic. marley is the youngest in the #cassiusandmarley brother duo. He loves people and talking. He likes drawing, building lego cities, and sharing random facts. He is excited about learning how to build and draw better.

Groups audience: 

Selena Velasco and Elijah

Selena Velasco is a brown queer, nonbinary femme mother to a nine year old brown child. Selena is a community organizer at API Chaya as the Queer Network Program Coordinator, supporting healing spaces for Queer and Trans survivors of violence. They are also a visual artist, poet, and tender loving Virgo residing on indigenous Coast Salish and Duwamish Territory in Seattle.

Groups audience: 

Carter Klenk-Morse, Saoirse and Rowan

Carter Klenk-Morse is queer, anarchist mother and radical unschooler living with her partner and children, Rowan (8) and Saoirse (6), in rural Vermont. She is a facilitator, organizer, and trainer with two decades of experience. Carter is a former board member of the National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs, YouthAction, the Third Wave Foundation, and the Colorado Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

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Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-Based Sex Ed for All
Our formal, school-based sex education is lacking. But what about our sexual pleasure education? It’s practically non-existent. How do we learn to make ourselves and our partners feel sexual pleasure? Often by accident, often by guess-and-check, and way-too-often in ways that are terribly misinformed by Google, social mores, and sweeping generalizations about what “everyone likes." This workshop will explore how we learn about pleasure by touching on some of our most pleasurable spots—the G-Spot, C-Spot (clitoris), and P-Spot (prostate). Where are these spots? Why do they feel good? What kind of sex toys, lubricants and communication strategies can we use to help us make them feel good? Walk away feeling empowered by new knowledge about how to bring yourself and your partners intentional pleasure in a straight-forward and relaxed learning environment. Propel radical sex education forward by starting in the most familiar place: with your own bodies, between your own sheets. This workshop does not equate anatomy with gender and will use language in line with those beliefs.
Speakers (click to view): Yana Tallon-Hicks

Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-Based Sex Ed for All

Speakers

Yana Tallon-Hicks

Yana Tallon-Hicks is a therapist, sex columnist, and a consent, sex and sexuality writer and educator living in Northampton, MA. She is a graduate of Hampshire College where she studied LGBTQ+ community and sex education, and is a RRASC alum. Her work centers around the belief that pleasure-positive and consent-based sex education can positively impact our lives and the world.

Groups audience: 

Mourning, Healing, and Dreaming In Puerto Rican
In September 2017, Puerto Rico was battered by two historic Category 5 hurricanes—Irma and Maria left most of the island without power, communication capability or clean water, destroyed an estimated 70,000 homes, and damaged about 250,000 more. However, decolonization does not exist for the Puerto Rican. There is no sovereignty that lives here in this colonial United States. We are watching our homeland swallowed by the ocean. The bodies and bones of our ancestors unearthed, floating, trees and roots removed, pollution. This is xenophobia, but that’s not what anyone wants to call it. Yes, we are mourning, and we are healing and our rebuilding our island. Join us as we share and imagine and need each of you to help us dream of a Puerto Rico that survives and lives!
Speakers (click to view): Aimée Thorne-Thomsen, Bianca I Laureano, MA, CSE, Lisbeth M Rivera

Mourning, Healing, and Dreaming In Puerto Rican

Speakers

Aimée Thorne-Thomsen

Aimée Thorne-Thomsen is Vice President for Strategic Partnerships at Advocates for Youth, which champions policies and programs to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. In that capacity, she oversees and coordinates the development, implementation, and evaluation of Advocates’ strategic partnerships with youth activists and colleague organizations, including those in the social and reproductive justice movements.

Groups audience: 

- Private group -

Bianca I Laureano, MA, CSE

Bianca is an award-winning sexologist, curriculum writer, and educator. She is a foundress of the Women of Color Sexual Health Network (WOCSHN), the LatiNegrxs Project, and hosts LatinoSexuality.com. Bianca has published two curricula and provides workshops and trainings on justice for seasoned educators.

Groups audience: 

Lisbeth M Rivera

Lisbeth Meléndez Rivera is a 30+ year veteran of the LGBTQ and labor movements. Lisbeth has extensive experience organizing and training at the intersections of sexual orientation, gender identity, and culture, specifically as they relate to communities of color. Lisbeth has crisscrossed the country training workers and community leaders in organizing, leadership development, and community building strategies from a grassroots perspective. She has also done extensive work supporting LGBTQ leaders in America Latina.

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No Milk For Your Cookies: A Critical Look at White Allyship in the RJ Movement
More recently, there has been an influx of white-led and white-centered organizations presenting their work as Reproductive Justice; through a variety of leadership networks, national convenings/conferences, and media-based resources, several patterns have been noticed across these organizations. When in community engagement spaces, the erasure of the intellectual and emotional labor of Black women is often paired with information that lacks the racial concentration and cultural competency that the RJ framework requires. Throughout this workshop, the participants will participate in critical thinking, group discussion, small group activities, and interactive media presentations that solidify the importance of Black women, race-specificity, challenging co-opting spaces and organizations, and ally/accomplice-ship as integral parts of the Reproductive Justice movement. This session is Part II of a two-part workshop series and will build upon Part I: "A Seat At The Table: Exploring Disruptive Leadership with a Solange Soundtrack." Join us for one or both sessions!
Speakers (click to view): Alana Belle, Randi Gregory, Kris Keen, Erin Grant

No Milk For Your Cookies: A Critical Look at White Allyship in the RJ Movement

Speakers

Alana Belle

Alana has been involved in various social justice movements for a few years; she has influenced change in regards to local politics, racial justice, economic justice, and most recently, reproductive justice. The current Community Organizer for New Voices for Reproductive Justice - Cleveland, Alana welcomes every opportunity to engage people in the RJ movement.

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Randi Gregory

Randi has been organizing on electoral, union, and issue based campaigns for the last 8 years. She is dedicated to bringing grassroots organizing and public policy to marginalized communities, specifically LGBTQIA youth of color. She previously worked for SEIU and NARAL Pro Choice Ohio as well as various state Democratic parties as a field director. Currently Randi serves as the Director of Programs for SPARK Reproductive Justice Now, where she is responsible for their field and policy work.

Kris Keen

Over the past 7 years Kris has dedicated their time to various nonprofit arts and culture and issue-based campaigns to support working class youth of color in Philadelphia. For the past two years Kris worked as a youth organizer servicing Black and Brown youth who were pushed out of and disinvested in by traditional public schools of Philadelphia. Kris is now using that experience to influence their work as a community organizer dedicated to developing Black women, fems, and girls in partnership with LGBTQIA organizations to achieve health and wellness through centering a reproductive justice framework.

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Radical Reproductive Justice
Reproductive justice is and will continue to be resisted by the right and co-opted by the left. Critics on the right and left often refuse to use the human rights framework in talking about reproductive justice, and some mainstream groups attempt to avoid discussions of white supremacy in the pro-choice movement. Even some women of color attempt similar things and focus on the concepts of intersectionality, rather than the human rights basis of reproductive justice. Some argue that reproductive justice is not appropriate or applicable to white women, people of trans or nonbinary experience, or men. Bring your questions for this roundtable to discuss how to keep reproductive justice radical and revolutionary, and able to fulfill its transformative possibilities.
Speakers (click to view): Loretta J. Ross, Toni M Bond Leonard, Lynn Roberts, PhD

Radical Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Loretta J. Ross

Loretta J. Ross was the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012. She helped create the theory of "Reproductive Justice" in 1994 and led a rape crisis center in the 1970s. She co-authored Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice in 2004, and Reproductive Justice: An Introduction in 2017.

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Toni M Bond Leonard

Toni Bond Leonard is one of the founding mothers of the reproductive justice movement. Toni is a womanist theo-ethicist whose scholarship focuses on the intersection of religion and reproductive justice. She currently works at Physicians for Reproductive Health as Director of its Partnership for Abortion Provider Safety.

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Lynn Roberts, PhD

Lynn Roberts is an assistant professor in the Department of Community Health and Social Sciences at the CUNY School of Public Health. Prior to joining CUNY, she oversaw the development, implementation, and evaluation of several prevention programs for women and youth in NYC. Dr. Roberts’ current activism and scholarship examines the intersections of race, class, and gender in adolescent dating relationships, juvenile justice, and reproductive health policies, as well as the impact of models of collaborative inquiry and teaching on civic and political engagement. She is co-editor and contributing author of the anthology Radical Reproductive Justice: Foundation, Theory, Practice, Critique (Feminist Press, 2017).

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Southern Organizing Strategy Session
Southerners, let's leverage our collective power and expertise and get organized across borders! In this strategy session, we will work together to create a map that identifies each person’s areas of expertise, and growth areas to find the ways we can work together and level up our knowledge and skills. We will also learn about what everyone is working on both within and outside of their organizations and build connections based on how folks want to grow their work. You will walk away with next steps to work with someone else doing RJ work in the South, and a growing support system.
Speakers (click to view): Marlo Barrera, Oriaku Njoku

Southern Organizing Strategy Session

Speakers

Marlo Barrera

Marlo is a founding member of ReJAC, which recently launched the Plan B NOLA text and healthline. Plan B NOLA distributes free and by-donation emergency contraception through a city-wide network of Community Support Members and Community Outposts. She is a New Orleans native interested in building more and stronger organizing relationships and support systems across the south.

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Oriaku Njoku

Oriaku Njoku, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast, works at the intersection of meaningful abortion access, queer liberation and reproductive justice. Currently, she ensures funding for families seeking abortion care and advocates for individuals and their chosen families in the Southeast. As a big advocate of self-care, Oriaku uses her time off with the love of her life, her ragamuffin dogs, and cupcakes. Connect with her @oreawku on twitter - all views her own.

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Taking Control of Our Reproductive Health — Self Managed Abortion, Safe and Supported
We must become informed about technologies that impact our reproductive lives, and build strategies to put these technologies into our own hands. In this workshop, participants will learn about how abortion pills work, and how they are used safely with and without medical supervision. We will discuss legal issues and how to mitigate legal risk for those using abortion pills outside of the medical system. We will also talk about how self managed abortion is an empowerment strategy which incorporates the core principles of reproductive justice. Resources for continuing education on these issues will be distributed. As a group, we will brainstorm innovative strategies for spreading information to vulnerable communities, learning from models used in other countries.
Speakers (click to view): Susan Yanow, MSW, Marlene Gerber Fried

Taking Control of Our Reproductive Health — Self Managed Abortion, Safe and Supported

Speakers

Susan Yanow, MSW

Susan Yanow works to expand access to abortion domestically and internationally. She is a cofounder of Women Help Women, an international organization that provides medication abortion services, and EASE (Expanding Abortion Services in the South). Susan coordinates the Later Abortion Initiative at Ibis Reproductive Health. She serves on the Boards of the ACLU of Massachusetts, Nurses for Sexual & Reproductive Health, and Social Workers for Reproductive Justice.

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Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a scholar and long-time advocate for abortion access and reproductive justice. She is Professor of Philosophy at Hampshire College and Faculty Director of CLPP. She serves on the board of the Abortion Rights Fund of Western MA and Our Bodies Ourselves, is a consultant to Women Help Women, and is currently a Global Scholar at the O’Neill Institute at Georgetown Law School.

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Taking Up Space: From Teens’ Experience
The main objective of this workshop is to explore what it means to take up space and becoming more comfortable with expressing your ideas, your needs, and your feelings. This workshop aims to give youth and adults alike a new perspective on respecting others’ voices and advocating for others. We will grow our definition of what taking up space means and analyzing how this definition of taking up space fits into our lives currently and ways we’d like to change it moving forward. This workshop is led through the lens of student activists navigating adult-oriented activist spaces and learning how to amplify our voices. Thus we’re asking for any self-identified adults to take a step back in this space and listen to what the youth have to say.
Speakers (click to view): Bebe Leistyna, Willa Sippel, Cherilyn Strader, Zoe Lemos

Taking Up Space: From Teens’ Experience

Speakers

Bebe Leistyna

Bebe is a full time high school student and finds joy doing justice work. Bebe became interested in social justice due to the powerful work of the Movement for Black Lives and especially Black Lives Matter. Bebe is excited to work with other young people to create change and is looking forward to finding a way to to use art as protest.

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Willa Sippel

Willa Sippel is a student, activist, and passionate feminist from Western Mass. She is co-president of Northampton High School's Feminist Collective, and a member of the Student Union. She is also involved with the area's arts and activism scene. This past February she played with her band at the Northampton Women's March. And she couldn't be more honored and excited to be here at CLPP!

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Cherilyn Strader

Cherilyn is a full time student and full time activist whose interest in social and political activism peaked during the 2016 election when people’s rights and safety came under threat. She currently works as an intern at Represent.Us and as the co-chair of her school's chapter of the Massachusetts High School Democrats. She aims to empower high schoolers' voices and hopes to continue advocating for youth and other underrepresented voices in her lifetime.

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Transforming Reproductive Justice: Trans Health Care Access
Trans, gender nonconforming, and non-binary people often have to play the role of their own health care experts and advocates. From misgendering to gatekeeping, to ignoring our reproductive needs, to making dangerous assumptions, health care providers and insurance companies can sometimes do more to harm than help. Factors like racism, transmisogyny, classism, and ableism make accessing health care more difficult for people already experiencing transphobia. Join this panel of activists making critical interventions in the landscape of health care access for trans people across the spectrum!
Speakers (click to view): Renae Taylor, Cecilia Maria Gentili, Kaleb Oliver Dornheim, Quita Tinsley

Transforming Reproductive Justice: Trans Health Care Access

Speakers

Renae Taylor

Renae Taylor is a 43 year old Non-Binary Trans person located in Memphis, TN. Renae is involved in many social and racial justice organizations. Renae is also a member of their local HIV Care and Prevention Planning Group.

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Cecilia Maria Gentili

Ms. Gentili currently serves as the Director of Policy and Public Affairs at GMHC, the world’s first and leading provider of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy. Originally from Argentina, Ms. Gentili started working as an intern at the LGBT Center in New York City, where she found her passion for advocacy and services. She went on to run the Transgender Health Program at Apicha CHC from 2012 to 2016. She is also a contributor to Trans Bodies, Trans Selves: A Resource for the Transgender Community, and is a collaborator with Translatina Network.

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Kaleb Oliver Dornheim

Kaleb Dornheim is 25, poor, trans/nonbinary, queer, mentally ill, Baltimore and Hudson Valley grounded, has their Masters in Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies concentrating in Trans Studies Education, and works at GMHC as a Sexual and Reproductive Advocate for TGNC folks. When they aren't working or doing activism, they like being around farm animals, plants, and engaging in Kardashian Discourse.

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Quita Tinsley

Quita Tinsley is a fat, Black, queer femme that writes, organizes, and works to build sustainable change in their home, the South. They currently serve as the Deputy Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast; and they're an alum of Echoing Ida, a Black women and non-binary folks' writing collective of Forward Together.

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We Are FAT Not Invisible
Join us for a conversation about how reproductive health, rights, and justice movements impact and interact with Fat bodies of color. This is an intentional space to for Fat folks to be prioritized and brainstorm strategies reclaim a movement that often erases us. Topics include access to healthcare, love, and visibility. This is a closed space for Fat People Of Color (size 16 and up).
Speakers (click to view): Guadalupe Ambrosio, Monserrat Ambrosio

We Are FAT Not Invisible

Speakers

Guadalupe Ambrosio

Guadalupe Ambrosio is co-director at the New York State Youth Leadership Council, the first undocumented youth-led organization in the state. She is dedicated to youth leadership and believes that it is important to center their experience and ideas in order to create lasting change. She started her work in body positivity in 2011 and has been a lead advocate in New York City since doing workshops to young girls of color about FAT Acceptance.

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Monserrat Ambrosio

My name is Monserrat Ambrosio, a 16 year old high school student who happens to be fat. My size has often impacted my interactions with doctors, clothes, and with myself. My goal is to create space for us to exist peacefully.

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Your Pleasure Toolkit: Rituals and Practices for the Movement
Our movements often center the violence our communities face. How can we hold onto the pleasure while navigating hostility? What shifts when we begin to center and celebrate pleasure? Our liberation depends on seeing our bodies as more than sites of harm, and pleasure rituals can help us with practicing our freedom. How can we ignite our pleasurable selves as we navigate hostile environments? What role does pleasure play in reproductive freedom? How can we get free while staying centered in our joy? How can pleasure and joy lead to freedom? This hands-on, interactive workshop will feature performance, community altar building, and toolkit building for activists wanting to invite pleasure into their lives and work. Participants will walk away with a number of concrete, specific examples and practices to incorporate into their lives, relationships, and organizations.
Speakers (click to view): Taja Lindley, Charmaine Lang

Your Pleasure Toolkit: Rituals and Practices for the Movement

Speakers

Taja Lindley

Taja Lindley is an artist based in Brooklyn. She is the founder of Colored Girls Hustle, and a member of Echoing Ida and Harriet's Apothecary. // ColoredGirlsHustle.com // TajaLindley.com

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Charmaine Lang

Charmaine spends her time Chicago style steppin’ in Milwaukee, daydreaming about what it would be like to have an Ooloi in her life and writing her dissertation. She is a fellow of Echoing Ida where she explores the intersections of class, wellness, and pleasure amongst Black women, and connects it to the long tradition of Black women’s activism.

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Saturday Session 3: 5:15PM - 6:45PM

Engaging Religious Communities in the Fight for Justice
How do we bring our whole selves into our activist work? How do we mobilize our faith communities to join the fight for justice? Join panelists from diverse religious traditions as we discuss connecting our religious and spiritual lives with our work for reproductive, racial, and economic justice. Participants will gain an understanding of why collaborative partnerships with faith communities can be important in this work, how religious leaders are currently engaging with the movement, and learn about examples of successful religious/secular partnerships from progressive movements.
Speakers (click to view): Toni M Bond Leonard, Elaina Ramsey, Sadia Arshad, Lisbeth M Rivera

Engaging Religious Communities in the Fight for Justice

Speakers

Toni M Bond Leonard

Toni Bond Leonard is one of the founding mothers of the reproductive justice movement. Toni is a womanist theo-ethicist whose scholarship focuses on the intersection of religion and reproductive justice. She currently works at Physicians for Reproductive Health as Director of its Partnership for Abortion Provider Safety.

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Elaina Ramsey

Elaina serves as the Executive Director of the Ohio Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. With a decade of campaign, advocacy, grassroots organizing, and communications experience at the intersections of faith and politics, Elaina has worked for various nonprofits and campaigns, including Sojourners, Women’s Action for New Directions, and Obama for America. She holds master's degrees in both Theological Studies and International Peace & Conflict Resolution.

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Sadia Arshad

Sadia Arshad is a reproductive justice nerd working in health communications during the day and doing youth empowerment and community engagement work at night. She fell into this work by accident, but couldn't be happier.

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Lisbeth M Rivera

Lisbeth Meléndez Rivera is a 30+ year veteran of the LGBTQ and labor movements. Lisbeth has extensive experience organizing and training at the intersections of sexual orientation, gender identity, and culture, specifically as they relate to communities of color. Lisbeth has crisscrossed the country training workers and community leaders in organizing, leadership development, and community building strategies from a grassroots perspective. She has also done extensive work supporting LGBTQ leaders in America Latina.

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Full Spectrum Reproductive Support: Doulas and Beyond
Everyone deserves access to non-judgmental emotional, physical, and informational support when moving through the full spectrum of reproductive experiences. In recent years, the doula model of care has been expanding to include not only birthing support, but also support for abortion, adoption, and reproductive loss. Come hear how various people and organizations are managing this landscape and add your ideas and questions to the conversation.
Speakers (click to view): Brenda Hernandez, Helen Bolton, Jasmine Errico

Full Spectrum Reproductive Support: Doulas and Beyond

Speakers

Brenda Hernandez

Brenda Hernandez is a law school diversity professional and a feminist activist. She is a trained abortion doula through the Boston Doula Project, and she writes for her blog, BoricuaFeminist.com. She has a BA in Women’s Studies from Mount Holyoke College and a JD from Pace University School of Law. Connect with her @boricuafeminist.

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Helen Bolton

Helen is the Senior Program Associate for the U.S. Litigation Program at the Center for Reproductive Rights and the Membership Coordinator for the Doula Project, where she also volunteers as a full spectrum doula.

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Jasmine Errico

Jasmine is a full spectrum doula, mama to two, and person in recovery. She is a current Francis Perkins student at Mount Holyoke College, a graduate of Holyoke Community College, and RRASC' 16. She formerly worked as a full spectrum doula and childbirth educator with Prison Birth Project and currently works with the Franklin County Doula Collective as well as independently in Hampshire and Hampden county. Her mission is to provide free doula services to families at the intersections of substance use, incarceration, poverty, domestic violence, and parenting.

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Gettin' Sh*t Done: A Young Persons Guide To Organizing and Self-Care
What are some ways you feel you have been treated differently in reproductive justice work because of your age or your student status? What are some common stereotypes often applied to us as a group, either positive and/or negative? And how do we navigate and deconstruct harmful narratives about our generation? Join us to discuss our experiences as young people in the RJ movement, developing our self-care practices, caring for our mental health, and harnessing our power as a generation. This is a closed space for young people.
Speakers (click to view): Madeline McCubbins, Nina Nicole Zamarripa

Gettin' Sh*t Done: A Young Persons Guide To Organizing and Self-Care

Speakers

Madeline McCubbins

Madeline McCubbins is a poor queer femme from Kentucky, who began organizing for reproductive rights and freedom as a student on University of Louisville's campus. Last summer, she was awarded a RRASC internship and worked with the Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center in South Dakota. She currently serves on Planned Parenthood’s Young Leaders Advisory Council.

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Nina Nicole Zamarripa

Nina is a Chicana from the border town of Pharr, Texas. She's a fourth year student at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley majoring in Psychology with minors in Biology and Chemistry. She's an advocate for reproductive justice, immigration rights, and mental health — as well as dismantling machismo/marianismo in the RGV.

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Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-Based Sex Ed for All
Our formal, school-based sex education is lacking. But what about our sexual pleasure education? It’s practically non-existent. How do we learn to make ourselves and our partners feel sexual pleasure? Often by accident, often by guess-and-check, and way-too-often in ways that are terribly misinformed by Google, social mores, and sweeping generalizations about what “everyone likes." This workshop will explore how we learn about pleasure by touching on some of our most pleasurable spots—the G-Spot, C-Spot (clitoris), and P-Spot (prostate). Where are these spots? Why do they feel good? What kind of sex toys, lubricants and communication strategies can we use to help us make them feel good? Walk away feeling empowered by new knowledge about how to bring yourself and your partners intentional pleasure in a straight-forward and relaxed learning environment. Propel radical sex education forward by starting in the most familiar place: with your own bodies, between your own sheets. This workshop does not equate anatomy with gender and will use language in line with those beliefs.
Speakers (click to view): Yana Tallon-Hicks

Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-Based Sex Ed for All

Speakers

Yana Tallon-Hicks

Yana Tallon-Hicks is a therapist, sex columnist, and a consent, sex and sexuality writer and educator living in Northampton, MA. She is a graduate of Hampshire College where she studied LGBTQ+ community and sex education, and is a RRASC alum. Her work centers around the belief that pleasure-positive and consent-based sex education can positively impact our lives and the world.

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How We Win: Using Direct Action to Increase Access to Abortion and Advance Reproductive Justice
If we want to stop losing and start winning, we need to make it clear that we are unwilling to lose. In this interactive workshop, facilitators will lead a direct action training tailored to reproductive justice activists and advocates working at the grassroots level. Using examples and clear definitions, we will cover what direct action is, why direct action is a necessary part of the movement, and how it is effective in bringing about change. We will spotlight the work of intersectional social change activists, and prepare participants to lead direct actions in their own communities.
Speakers (click to view): Erin Matson, Pamela Merritt

How We Win: Using Direct Action to Increase Access to Abortion and Advance Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Erin Matson

Erin Matson is co-founder and co-director of Reproaction, a direct action group formed to increase access to abortion and advance reproductive justice. She lives in Arlington, Virginia.

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Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

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Kindreds: Reproductive Justice for Trans/GNC/Non-Binary People
In its third installation, we have decided to work amongst ourselves and center the question of reproductive justice and trans justice for trans, gender non-conforming, and non-binary folks only. Often in part of building the work, we have to take a moment to just talk about our specific experiences in order to make asks and demands that center our needs without the gaze of cisgender people. We will be talking about the heartbreaks, working through self-care strategies, finding ways to take breaths together, and sharing organizing opportunities for collaborations and building with one another as trans, GNC, and non-binary folks invested in or curious about a trans-specific reproductive justice agenda. This is a closed space for people who identify as trans, GNC, and/or non-binary.
Speakers (click to view): Lill Hewko, Ash Williams, Kate Silvette, Ola Osaze, Quita Tinsley, Lucia Leandro Gimeno

Kindreds: Reproductive Justice for Trans/GNC/Non-Binary People

Speakers

Lill Hewko

Lill Hewko, a queer, trans nonbinary, mixed-Latinx from a working-class background, is a prison abolitionist and reproductive justice lawyer focusing on race, gender, child welfare, incarceration, and healing. Lill co-founded the Incarcerated Parents Project and the Incarcerated Mothers Advocacy Project, and is a founding board member of Surge Reproductive Justice. Lill is an attorney at the Transgender Law Center and works with QTPOC Birthwerq Project.

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Ash Williams

Ash Williams is a trans non-binary femme from Fayetteville, NC. As a Black Lives Matter organizer, Ash has educated the NC community about state-sanctioned violence as it relates to trans and queer people of color. Since 2013, this work has included leading rapid response actions, building solidarity and coalitions across differences, developing press strategies, designing campaigns, educating and mobilizing people on social media, and training other organizers. Ash is a 2016 Human Rights Advocacy Fellow in Residence and Ignite NC Fellow (working against voter suppression), and won the Cyrus M. Johnson Award for Peace and Social Justice in 2014 and the Charlotte Pride Young Catalyst Award in 2016. They hold a master's in Ethics and Applied Philosophy and a bachelor's in Philosophy from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Ash is also a dancer, choreographer, and dance teacher.

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Kate Silvette

Kate Silvette is a Native, Chicanx, disabled queer femme who works to hold and support others in the rocky realms of racial justice, decolonial reproductive justice, disability justice, and queer, POC parenthood. Silvette is a birth, abortion, and postpartum doula working as the Program Manager of the Birth Doula Services Program at Open Arms Perinatal Services.

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Ola Osaze

Ola Osaze is the national organizer for the Black LGBTQIA Migrant Project (BLMP), which protects and defends Black queer and trans migrants from immigration enforcement and criminal justice systems. Ola is a trans queer person from Nigeria who has also organized with the Audre Lorde Project, Uhuru Wazobia, and Sylvia Rivera Law Project, and has writings published in Queer Africa II, Saraba Magazine, Qzine, Black Looks, and Black Girl Dangerous, to name a few.

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Quita Tinsley

Quita Tinsley is a fat, Black, queer femme that writes, organizes, and works to build sustainable change in their home, the South. They currently serve as the Deputy Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast; and they're an alum of Echoing Ida, a Black women and non-binary folks' writing collective of Forward Together.

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Not Just "A Woman and Her Doctor": Supporting All Pregnant People in Self-Care
Throughout history, people have sought reproductive health care from trusted community members who hold body knowledge, such as healers, herbalists, and midwives, to help them avoid pregnancy, regulate menstruation, give birth, induce abortions, or complete miscarriages. Today, though many people seek care from professionalized providers such as OB/GYNs and abortion clinics, others seek self-directed care on their own or within their communities for a range of reproductive needs. Seismic political shifts that have made the future of access to reproductive health services more uncertain than ever have also ignited interest in community-based and self-directed solutions. Each of us has a role to play: from destigmatizing self-care and holistic models of reproductive health care, to distributing reproductive health information (such as how to end a pregnancy), to using law and policy tools to ensure that pregnant people and the people who support them are safe from arrest.
Speakers (click to view): Kebé, Lydia James, Farah Diaz-Tello, Alison Ojanen-Goldsmith

Not Just "A Woman and Her Doctor": Supporting All Pregnant People in Self-Care

Speakers

Kebé

Kebé is the Program Coordinator for SIA Legal Team. She uses both legal advocacy and grassroots organizing as tools to shape law that supports all people in determining if, when, and how we will become pregnant and create family in safe communities, free from the threat of state and interpersonal violence. She hails from the Lowcountry of South Carolina and is a wanderer at heart.

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Lydia James

Lydia James is a full spectrum doula focused on creating spaces and opportunities for people to exercise self-determination and bodily autonomy. After almost a decade in feminist and RJ spaces, she believes we can only have true reproductive justice when there are fewer gatekeepers over our reproductive lives.

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Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah is a human rights attorney dedicated to the pursuit of reproductive justice, with a focus on dignity, self-determination, and freedom from violence and coercion in pregnancy and the full spectrum of pregnancy outcomes. She is Senior Counsel for the SIA Legal Team, and serves on the Board of All-Options.

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Alison Ojanen-Goldsmith

Alison is an advocate, doula, and researcher whose work centers on herbal and home abortion, self-managed abortion, and peer-to-peer provision of abortion care and support through community networks. With over a decade of experience in reproductive health and justice research, direct service, and policy, she collaborates on creative projects that support and deepen our understanding of reproductive autonomy, abortion experiences, and safe abortion care.

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Organizing Through Narratives: Telling Your Stories in a Campaign
This workshop is designed around educating individuals on how to organize themselves and others around a sexual and reproductive justice campaign. Folks will learn how to employ social media and storytelling in creating a successful campaign to create change in their communities, regardless of gender/bodies. Participants will also hear how this framework was employed recently at GMHC, involving some of NYC’s most vulnerable communities, such as Latinx people and immigrants, transgender and gender non-conforming people, and people living with HIV/AIDS.
Speakers (click to view): Cecilia Maria Gentili, Kaleb Oliver Dornheim

Organizing Through Narratives: Telling Your Stories in a Campaign

Speakers

Cecilia Maria Gentili

Ms. Gentili currently serves as the Director of Policy and Public Affairs at GMHC, the world’s first and leading provider of HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy. Originally from Argentina, Ms. Gentili started working as an intern at the LGBT Center in New York City, where she found her passion for advocacy and services. She went on to run the Transgender Health Program at Apicha CHC from 2012 to 2016. She is also a contributor to Trans Bodies, Trans Selves: A Resource for the Transgender Community, and is a collaborator with Translatina Network.

Groups audience: 

Kaleb Oliver Dornheim

Kaleb Dornheim is 25, poor, trans/nonbinary, queer, mentally ill, Baltimore and Hudson Valley grounded, has their Masters in Women's, Gender, & Sexuality Studies concentrating in Trans Studies Education, and works at GMHC as a Sexual and Reproductive Advocate for TGNC folks. When they aren't working or doing activism, they like being around farm animals, plants, and engaging in Kardashian Discourse.

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People's History of Adoption Justice
Throughout history, the state removal of children from their families and communities has been used as a genocidal attack on native communities and communities of color, further advanced and fueled by missionary interests. While complicated, the historical contexts of the Indian Child Welfare Act, transnational adoption, and the rights of youth in state custody are fundamentally about reproductive justice. Let's talk about adoption justice by examining modern practices of adoption through the historical context of colonialism. Through storytelling and an intersectional analysis, panelists will open a conversation about the implications of the oppressive origins of modern adoption practice and implementing a community justice approach to family creation within the intricacies of race, class, power and privilege, sovereignty, and self-determination.
Speakers (click to view): Yong Chan Miller, Coya White Hat-Artichoker

People's History of Adoption Justice

Speakers
Redefining Allyship: Communities of Color Building Trust, Recognizing Privilege, and Uniting in Solidarity
Being an ally means engaging in a lifelong process of being intentional in how we show up for others. Within our communities, there are various identities that make being a person of color a rich experience. While our priority will always lie in centering the voices of our own communit(ies), solidarity among and within communities of color is becoming increasingly imperative in a political climate that seeks to divide us. How can communities of color unite in solidarity while also recognizing how our various identities and biases can impact how we do this? In this workshop, participants will explore how our intersected identities can shape the ways in which we show up for people within our communit(ies), identify how our various forms of privilege and biases can impact how we show up for other communities of color, and develop strategies for establishing meaningful connections to building intentional solidarity within communities of color.
Speakers (click to view): Nicole Clark, LMSW

Redefining Allyship: Communities of Color Building Trust, Recognizing Privilege, and Uniting in Solidarity

Speakers

Nicole Clark, LMSW

Nicole Clark is a licensed social worker, reproductive justice activist, and owner of Nicole Clark Consulting, where she works with POC and women-led organizations to design, implement, and evaluate culturally responsive programming and services for women and girls of color, with a racial justice and intersectional analysis.

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Sex Work and Reproductive Justice
People engaged in sex work face unique barriers when accessing healthcare, housing, and freedom from incarceration or state violence. From Stop and Frisk and Crimes Against Nature laws to efforts to restrict access to social or health services based on current or former sex work, reproductive oppression is institutionalized for people engaged in (or perceived to be engaged in) sex work. How can our movement shift to destigmatize and support those engaged in sex work? Join activists working to challenge and re-frame narratives around sex work and address the healthcare inaccess, criminalization, and harmful policies targeting some of the most marginalized people in our communities through organizing, community building, and advocacy work.
Speakers (click to view): Nia Weeks, Amber Batts, Bella Vendetta, Jenna Torres

Sex Work and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Nia Weeks

Nia Weeks the director of Policy and Advocacy at Women With A Vision, located in New Orleans, Louisiana. She is a native of New Orleans, and has spent years fighting for the rights of women, children, and families. As a former public defender and the inaugural Director of Policy and Advocacy for WWAV, her goals for the department is to cover not only broad, national trends, but also take a specific deep dive into the conditions of all Black women.

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Amber Batts

Sex worker deemed sex trafficker from Alaska, where consensual sex workers organized together for safety and security is sex trafficking according to legislation. In 2014 I was charged for sex trafficking due to operating a progressive coalition business featuring sex workers. I was sentenced to 5.5 years and currently I am on discretionary parole.

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Bella Vendetta

Bella Vendetta is a veteran of the adult industry, as an award winning performer and director of fetish films, a sex workers' rights advocate, and as a stripper and professional Dominatrix with over 15 years of training and experience.

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Jenna Torres

Jenna Torres is a community advocate and human rights supporter. She is a published author, spoken word artist, entrepreneur, and above all a proud mother to three beautiful children! She believes people have agency to make the best decisions possible in order to survive. She defends them and works with communities to build realistic solutions to real life problems like violence, poverty, and discrimination. Jenna’s vision is to empower communities often overlooked and overcriminalized.

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Stand Up To Population Alarmism
Many of us learn from school and the media that "overpopulation" is one of the major causes, if not the major cause, of hunger, poverty, environmental degradation, migration, and even political instability. "Overpopulation" thinking often leads to harmful policies and campaigns that undermine reproductive freedom and environmental justice. Learn to combat it with fresh, feminist perspectives on population, the environment, and organizing.
Speakers (click to view): Anne Hendrixson

Stand Up To Population Alarmism

Speakers

Anne Hendrixson

Anne Hendrixson is the director of PopDev, the Population and Development Program at Hampshire College.

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Voting for Justice
As our fears become realized in the national political theater, the connection between electoral politics and our livelihood has become sharply clear: lawmakers and politicians impact our daily lives and our reproductive futures. How can engaging in politics at the local level offer real change in our communities? How can combating voter suppression and getting our most marginalized voters to the polls change our local — and national — political landscape? Join this panel of activists working to break down barriers to voting and empower communities across the country to invest in grassroots political work.
Speakers (click to view): Monica Simpson, Randi Gregory, Nourbese Flint

Voting for Justice

Speakers

Monica Simpson

Monica is the Executive Director of SisterSong: Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. Monica has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, racism and intolerance and is deeply invested in southern movement building. Because of her “artivism” Monica was named as a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine and chosen as one of Advocate Magazine’s 40 under 40 leaders.

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Randi Gregory

Randi has been organizing on electoral, union, and issue based campaigns for the last 8 years. She is dedicated to bringing grassroots organizing and public policy to marginalized communities, specifically LGBTQIA youth of color. She previously worked for SEIU and NARAL Pro Choice Ohio as well as various state Democratic parties as a field director. Currently Randi serves as the Director of Programs for SPARK Reproductive Justice Now, where she is responsible for their field and policy work.

Nourbese Flint

Nourbese Flint is a blerd with a background in reproductive justice, journalism, all things X-Men and Batman related, matte lipsticks, Bob's Burgers, and Star Trek. She is currently working at Black Women for Wellness where she directs policy, RJ programs, civic engagement graphics, and keeping markers and crayons organized.

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White Supremacy in the Age of Trump
The Presidency of Donald Trump includes a resurgence of white supremacy in mainstream politics and attacks on women's human rights. Feminist activist and scholar Loretta Ross will discuss how the reproductive justice framework counters ideologies of white supremacy and male supremacy. Ross will also share insights about the strengths and challenges of contemporary activism and suggest strategies for reproductive justice movement building.
Speakers (click to view): Loretta J. Ross

White Supremacy in the Age of Trump

Speakers

Loretta J. Ross

Loretta J. Ross was the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012. She helped create the theory of "Reproductive Justice" in 1994 and led a rape crisis center in the 1970s. She co-authored Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice in 2004, and Reproductive Justice: An Introduction in 2017.

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Sunday 9:00AM - 10:30AM

Black Mamas Matter: Film and Talk Back
"April 11-17, 2018 marks the first Black Maternal Health Week, which is a week of raising awareness, engaging in activism and building community because Black Mamas Matter! We are advocating for national attention to reproductive justice for Black mamas, lifting our voices for access to care and fighting for our lives and the lives of our sisters. Black pregnant and birthing people in the United States are dying at alarming rates because of the health consequences of systemic racism and intersecting forms of oppression. The documentary ""Death by Delivery"" explores the depth of this problem and challenges us to come up with solutions. Join us for a viewing of this film and an interactive discussion about how we can impact these outcomes."
Speakers (click to view): Jamarah Amani, Nicole Clark, MSW

Black Mamas Matter: Film and Talk Back

Speakers

Jamarah Amani

Jamarah Amani is a Licensed Midwife who believes in the power of birth and that every baby has a human right to be breastfed. Her mission is to do her part to build a movement for Birth Justice locally, nationally and globally. A community organizer from the age of sixteen, Jamarah has worked with several organizations across the United States and in Africa on various public health issues, including HIV prevention, infant mortality risk reduction, access to emergency contraception, access to midwifery care and an end to shackling of incarcerated pregnant/birthing people.

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Nicole Clark, MSW

Nicole Clark is a social worker, consultant, and activist. She works with women and girls of color, communities and organizations, centering on HIV/STI prevention, reproductive rights, sexuality, gender-based violence, spirituality, pro-choice activism, youth empowerment, community organizing, street harassment, self-care, and media imagery. Contact Nicole at info@nicole-clark.com or follow her on Twitter at @MsNicoleClark.

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- Private group -
Building Power Through Health Care Access: Direct Service Providers Organize for Change
From abortion fund health lines to statehouses to exam rooms, direct service providers across disciplines can use their roles in health care provision to build power in their communities. In this session, panelists will think expansively about the definitions of health care providers and models of provider advocacy and discuss the diverse ways in which direct service providers — including physicians, doulas, social workers, and more — can organize to advance reproductive health, rights, and justice. In addition to sharing the work each of the respective panelists does at their organizations and in their communities, we will engage the audience in brainstorming and sharing out the challenges and opportunities that exist within their own work to build power and enact multi-level change.
Speakers (click to view): Symone New, Laura Riker, Lauren Boc, Oriaku Njoku

Building Power Through Health Care Access: Direct Service Providers Organize for Change

Speakers

Symone New

Symone New is a full spectrum birth, abortion, and adoption doula. She has been a member of the Doula Project since 2010 and serves on the organization's Leadership Circle. Symone has a passion for spreading the doula model of care far and wide, and has worked with individuals and groups nationally and internationally. Symone is also a member of CLPP's Fundraising Advisory Board.

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Laura Riker

Laura is the Senior Program Manager at the Reproductive Health Access Project, where she organizes primary care clinicians from across the country to work together to expand access to comprehensive reproductive health care in primary care. Laura is a social worker with a background in Women’s Studies, and has previously worked in community mental health and interpersonal violence prevention. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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Lauren Boc

Lauren Boc is the State Public Policy Associate at Physicians for Reproductive Health. Lauren works with health care providers and reproductive health, rights, and justice advocates around the country to bring the provider voice into state-level reproductive health policy advocacy by providing opportunities for policy engagement, technical assistance, and supportive trainings to health care providers.

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Oriaku Njoku

Oriaku Njoku, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast, works at the intersection of abortion access and reproductive justice. She and the ARC-Southeast team supports Southerners in navigating pathways to accessing safe, affordable, and compassionate abortion care through funding, logistics, and advocacy. Connect with her @oreawku on Twitter — all views her own.

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Calling In The Call Out Culture
We all know what it means to call someone out. Are you ready to call them IN? Calling IN challenges us to address people with compassion and a spirit of inclusion even - or especially - in the crucial moments when their behavior is problematic. Join us for a conversation on how we can achieve this accountability through love.
Speakers (click to view): Loretta Ross

Calling In The Call Out Culture

Speakers

Loretta Ross

Loretta Ross is the former national coordinator for SisterSong with a 40-year history in the feminist movement. She is one of the creators of the popular Reproductive Justice framework. In 2004, she was the co-Director of the March for Women's Lives in Washington, DC with more than 1 million participants. In the 1970s, she directed the first rape crisis center in the U.S. She is the co-author of Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice, along with Jael Silliman, Marlene Fried and Elena Gutierrez. She is an expert on feminism, human rights, racism and bigotry, and violence against women.

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- Private group -
Hood Girl Healing
We seek to explore how Black and Brown femmes from the hood heal and nourish their bodies and souls. In this workshop, we will be using interactive activities and fishbowl discussions to envision a new consensus surrounding healing for Black and Brown femmes. We intend to create a space where we recognize Black and Brown femmes as capable of self-determination and understanding their own capabilities. We intend to make space for authentic, genuine narratives of poverty, hood feminisms, and personal accounts from all poor folks and invite conversations on how to create accessibility in conversations centering healing. This is a closed space for People Of Color.
Speakers (click to view): Brienne Colston, Sade Swift

Hood Girl Healing

Speakers

Brienne Colston

Brienne Colston is a Black queer feminist youth worker, facilitator, and community organizer hailing from the South Bronx. Colston is the founder of Brown Girl Recovery, a collective dedicated to prioritizing healing justice and providing community spaces to womxn of color in the Bronx and other uptown areas through social justice programming and events. A graduate of Lawrence University with degrees in Gender Studies and History, Colston found her passion in small town grassroots organizing and resistance work. In addition to working with BGR, Colston serves as a racial justice & political education facilitator for an array of small community-based organizations including the Audre Lorde Project, and directs their first-ever queer/trans/non-binary POC choir! She has facilitated healing justice-based workshops and community gatherings at institutions such as the United Nations, the Posse Foundation, Sadie Nash Leadership Project, Black Women's Blueprint, and Spelman College. A self-described "fatBlackSUPERwomxn," Colston is eager to hold space for dope Black and Brown femmes everywhere!

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Sade Swift

Sade Swift works as the assistant director of Brown Girl Recovery. where she works to create healing spaces for black and brown femmes and women uptown and the Bronx. Sade recently began sharing her craft, "Cards by De" as her labor of love to the world, creating handmade cards to express gratitude for all occasions. For her, creating in this way is how she heals.

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I F^#*ed Up! Here’s What I Learned and How I Apologized
There’s no conference on failure, even though almost all of us have experienced failure in our professional lives. Failure is a natural part of our personal and professional lives and yet we rarely acknowledge the topic outside of supervision and self-reflection. In this session, we are putting a spotlight on failing and moving forward! Two professionals from the field of sex education will share personal stories and reflections on professional failures. We will discuss failure, a topic that brings up strong feelings of shame, guilt, and insecurity; with the goal of showing participants how to learn from failure and move forward in a meaningful way. We will provide examples from popular culture and best practices (and worst practices!) in apologizing to those we’ve harmed in our failure. Worksheets, resources, and coping strategies will be introduced for participants to use in their professional work environments with children, youth, and in intergenerational settings. This session is open to all with a focus on women and femmes of color.
Speakers (click to view): Bianca I Laureano, MA, CSE, Sara C. Flowers, DrPH

I F^#*ed Up! Here’s What I Learned and How I Apologized

Speakers

Bianca I Laureano, MA, CSE

Bianca is an award-winning sexologist, curriculum writer, and educator. She is a foundress of the Women of Color Sexual Health Network (WOCSHN), the LatiNegrxs Project, and hosts LatinoSexuality.com. Bianca has published two curricula and provides workshops and trainings on justice for seasoned educators.

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Sara C. Flowers, DrPH

Sara is an advocate for evidence-informed practice and emotional intelligence in sexuality health education. Her research interests focus on fidelity and adaptation of sexuality health education curricula, and other sexual health topics as they relate to disparities, youth of color, and abortion access. Sara holds a Doctor of Public Health degree from CUNY School of Public Health & Health Policy.

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Immigration Justice in Dangerous Times
Today, immigrants face a dangerous social and political climate, especially those who are Black, undocumented, young, Muslim, Latinx, queer, or trans. Deadly anti-immigrant policies and rhetoric have been emboldened by the legitimization of xenophobic hysteria and overt racism in politics, media, and our daily lives. How do immigrants and undocumented folks experience the impacts of harmful political myths? And how can our movements center the needs and experiences of immigrants and their families and communities? Join this panel of activists working across movements to hear about the realities of scapegoating, criminalization, detention and deportation, and learn multi-pronged strategies for political intervention and advocacy for immigrant communities.
Speakers (click to view): Deborah Ortiz, Guadalupe Ambrosio, Rage Kidvai, Ola Osaze, Janet Perez Valle

Immigration Justice in Dangerous Times

Speakers

Deborah Ortiz

Deborah Ortiz is a legal assistant in a small personal injury firm in Los Angeles. She is also one of the co-chairs for the Los Angeles Chapter for California Latinas for Reproductive Justice, a member of Planned Parenthood Young Professionals in Los Angeles, and mentor for a community-based nonprofit photography organization for young women called Las Fotos Project.

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Guadalupe Ambrosio

Guadalupe Ambrosio is co-director at the New York State Youth Leadership Council, the first undocumented youth-led organization in the state. She is dedicated to youth leadership and believes that it is important to center their experience and ideas in order to create lasting change. She started her work in body positivity in 2011 and has been a lead advocate in New York City since doing workshops to young girls of color about FAT Acceptance.

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Rage Kidvai

Rage is a public defender in Brooklyn Criminal Defense practice of the Legal Aid Society. They also work with 5 Boro Defenders focusing on prosecutor accountability and immigration issues. Prior to this, Rage was an Equal Justice Works Fellow in the Sylvia Rivera Law Project’s Immigrant Defense Project. Rage is a graduate of CUNY Law School and Hampshire College.

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Ola Osaze

Ola Osaze is the national organizer for the Black LGBTQIA Migrant Project (BLMP), which protects and defends Black queer and trans migrants from immigration enforcement and criminal justice systems. Ola is a trans queer person from Nigeria who has also organized with the Audre Lorde Project, Uhuru Wazobia, and Sylvia Rivera Law Project, and has writings published in Queer Africa II, Saraba Magazine, Qzine, Black Looks, and Black Girl Dangerous, to name a few.

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Janet Perez Valle

Janet Perez Valle is the Volunteer Coordinator and Community Organizer for Mixteca Organization located in Brooklyn, New York. As a directly impacted person, her work in immigration and with undocumented communities has inspired her to continue advocating and organizing in both her work and personal life.

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Not Your Model Minority: AAPIs and the RJ Movement
When discussing issues specific to people of color, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) are often left out of the conversation due to the perception that AAPIs fare just as well or even better than their white counterparts. Participants will be presented with information that shatters this myth and then delve deeper into specific topics such as the criminalization of pregnant AAPI women, abortion bans that target AAPIs, and issues in immigrant rights and economic justice facing our communities.
Speakers (click to view): Jane Liu, Jaclyn Dean

Not Your Model Minority: AAPIs and the RJ Movement

Speakers

Jane Liu

Jane Liu brings over ten years of experience in public interest litigation to her work as the Legal Director at the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum. NAPAWF is the only national, multi-issue Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women's organization in the country. Its mission is to build a movement to advance social justice and human rights for AAPI women and girls.

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Jaclyn Dean

Jaclyn is the Policy Associate for the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum (NAPAWF), where she manages the organization’s policy advocacy efforts in reproductive rights and immigrant rights. She was born and raised in Dallas, Texas and is the proud daughter of Taiwanese immigrants. Jaclyn holds a BA from Rice University and a Master in Public Policy from the Kennedy School of Government.

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Reproductive Justice 101
Reproductive justice was coined in 1994 by Women of African Descent for Reproductive Justice, a group of Black women who recognized that the white-led women's rights movement was not prioritizing issues critical to women of color, and that we must represent our own communities. This workshop will discuss some of the history of RJ as well as give participants a chance to express their RJ stories. The workshop also involves understanding what's at stake for folk who are often left out of reproductive justice considerations, such as trans women and trans non-binary folks.
Speakers (click to view): Ash Williams, Monica Simpson

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers

Ash Williams

Ash Williams is a trans non-binary femme from Fayetteville, NC. As a Black Lives Matter organizer, Ash has educated the NC community about state-sanctioned violence as it relates to trans and queer people of color. Since 2013, this work has included leading rapid response actions, building solidarity and coalitions across differences, developing press strategies, designing campaigns, educating and mobilizing people on social media, and training other organizers. Ash is a 2016 Human Rights Advocacy Fellow in Residence and Ignite NC Fellow (working against voter suppression), and won the Cyrus M. Johnson Award for Peace and Social Justice in 2014 and the Charlotte Pride Young Catalyst Award in 2016. They hold a master's in Ethics and Applied Philosophy and a bachelor's in Philosophy from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Ash is also a dancer, choreographer, and dance teacher.

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Monica Simpson

Monica is the Executive Director of SisterSong: Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. Monica has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, racism and intolerance and is deeply invested in southern movement building. Because of her “artivism” Monica was named as a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine and chosen as one of Advocate Magazine’s 40 under 40 leaders.

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Reproductive Politics in Latin American and Muslim-Majority Countries
This panel will look at the reproductive politics surrounding sterilization and abortion in Latin American and Muslim-majority countries. We will discuss the ongoing politics of the sterilization cases in Peru from the 1990s, criminalization and liberalization of abortion in Latin America, and the range of legal realities regarding abortion in Muslim-majority countries. We will consider these politics in the context of the troubling international family planning scene. On the one hand is the anti-choice, anti-contraception conservative backlash (Trump's reinforcement of the Global Gag Rule, for instance, or the use of religion to curtail women's bodily rights) and on the other, a neoliberal, philanthrocapitalist agenda, which includes a return to numeric targets and an emphasis on long-acting reversible contraception. As part of this complicated picture, we will look at instances of feminist resistance.
Speakers (click to view): Anissa Hélie, Anne Hendrixson, Cora Fernandez Anderson, Julietta Chaparro

Reproductive Politics in Latin American and Muslim-Majority Countries

Speakers

Anissa Hélie

Anissa Hélie teaches History at John Jay College, CUNY, New York. She is active in the fields of sexuality, wars and conflicts, and religious fundamentalisms (and the unfortunate intersection of the three). She grew up in Algiers, Algeria, and has been involved with various women’s organizations and transnational networks since the 1980s.

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Anne Hendrixson

Anne Hendrixson is the director of PopDev, the Population and Development Program at Hampshire College.

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Cora Fernandez Anderson

Cora Fernandez Anderson is an Assistant Professor in Comparative Politics at Mount Holyoke College. Her research focuses on women's movements in Latin America and the impact they have in shaping public policy. She is currently working on a book about the campaigns to decriminalize abortion in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay.

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Say Something Prevention Lab: A Social Experiment in Creating Safe Community
Every day, you have the opportunity to Say Something that can help prevent interpersonal violence. In this workshop, we will Learn, Act, and Be using real-life scenarios to practice the skills to prepare us to interrupt violent language or behavior in our community. This workshop will help participants to identify the various forms and intensity of interpersonal violence and practice the skills to be able to intervene on their own behalf or as active bystanders. It allows for a safe space to practice trusting our judgment and formulating what to say or do to interrupt when something is not okay—whether that be with friends, family, peers, or strangers. Participants will be challenged to lean into awkward moments to practice how they can Say Something in various situations to work to build a safer community.
Speakers (click to view): Rob Powell

Say Something Prevention Lab: A Social Experiment in Creating Safe Community

Speakers

Rob Powell

Rob Powell is the Training and Volunteer Program Coordinator at Safe Passage. Prior to working with Safe Passage, Rob served as the Coordinator for the Women's Center and LGBTQ Center at Wake Forest University. He also was the Member Services Coordinator at the North Carolina Coalition Against Sexual Assault, where he supported the 88 rape crisis centers in North Carolina. Outside of work, Rob delights in time with his husband, a lil baby, and sweet dog, and in consuming large amounts of reality television.

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Talking With Conservative Family and Friends About Abortion
It’s common to feel frustrated, angry, and/or drained by conversations with people we care about who hold deeply conservative views on reproductive health, especially abortion. The disconnection can be very painful, especially when it’s close family or friends. Often the differences involve religious beliefs, which can be particularly hard to negotiate. Often the sense of urgency and passion we feel is at odds with the reality that changing deeply held beliefs is an uncertain and often extremely slow process. In this interactive workshop, we will explore approaches and skills for having more productive conversations across ideological divides. We will review research on how liberals and conservatives construct morality differently, share experiences, and consider some new approaches. We will also examine different ways of defining success in these interactions. with the twin goals of reducing cultural stigma against abortion and maintaining (or maybe even improving) these potentially challenging relationships.
Speakers (click to view): Latishia James, M.Div., Madeline Blodgett, Rev. Rob Keithan

Talking With Conservative Family and Friends About Abortion

Speakers

Latishia James, M.Div.

Latishia James is a trauma-informed facilitator, counselor, and advocate with almost 10 years of experience in sexual and reproductive justice. After earning her Master of Divinity from Pacific School of Religion, Latishia began a consulting practice, where she supports survivors of religious and/or sexual trauma, facilitates workshops, and provides faith-based counseling to people making an array of reproductive decisions.

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Madeline Blodgett

Madeline Blodgett, MPH is a facilitative leader, researcher, and collaboration designer leveraging empathy, evidence, and human-centered design to create culture change.

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Rev. Rob Keithan

Rev. Rob Keithan is the Minister of Social Justice at All Souls Church Unitarian in Washington, DC. His passion is working for long-term culture change in ways that engage the complex issues of religion, race, morality, and reproductive health.

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When Care is Out of Reach: Reproductive Justice IS Economic Justice
From community health clinics to grassroots organizations to direct service collectives, activists are making interventions at every level to ensure the health and safety of their communities. Deepen your understanding of economic injustice and its connections to reproductive oppression, racism, and state violence in this informative session featuring activists and organizers from across the Midwest and South. Panelists will share challenges and innovative strategies for broadening health care access in under-resourced communities.
Speakers (click to view): Alana Belle, Marlo Barrera, Nikia Paulette, Jessica Williams

When Care is Out of Reach: Reproductive Justice IS Economic Justice

Speakers

Alana Belle

Alana has been involved in various social justice movements for a few years; she has influenced change in regards to local politics, racial justice, economic justice, and most recently, reproductive justice. The current Community Organizer for New Voices for Reproductive Justice - Cleveland, Alana welcomes every opportunity to engage people in the RJ movement.

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Marlo Barrera

Marlo is a founding member of ReJAC, which recently launched the Plan B NOLA text and healthline. Plan B NOLA distributes free and by-donation emergency contraception through a city-wide network of Community Support Members and Community Outposts. She is a New Orleans native interested in building more and stronger organizing relationships and support systems across the south.

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Nikia Paulette

Nikia Paulette is a grassroots organizer with Planned Parenthood of the St Louis Region, working at the intersections of race, class, and gender towards reproductive justice. Paulette is a board member of the Gateway Access Fund and a current story teller with National Network of Abortion Funds We Testify program. She also has a 9 year old daughter.

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Jessica Williams

Jessica Williams is a domestic violence advocate with Freedom Inc.. Jessica's domestic violence work is catered toward and culturally specific to the black community. During her time in Madison she became increasingly aware of the racial disparities that exist in the city. After a string of high profile deaths of black teens at the hands of police she became actively involved in local movements and community organizing.

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