Workshop schedule for 2017 Conference

Friday 4:00PM - 6:00PM

#BeBoldEndHyde: The Movement to End the Hyde Amendment
For 40 years, the Hyde Amendment has targeted poor people, people of color and young people by banning abortion coverage from Medicaid--condemning many to unsafe procedures or unwanted pregnancies. Women of color in the reproductive justice movement have risen up to take on Hyde and, with it, 40 years of stigma and silence. In the last 5 years, All* Above All introduced the EACH Woman Act, proactive state & local policies, built relationships with the economic justice movement, and mobilized thousands of grassroots supporters. Until recently, both political parties routinely negotiated away abortion coverage--former President Obama referred to Hyde as an “institution”. This year, for the first time, Democratic candidates and the Democratic Platform are calling for the repeal of Hyde. Learn how our leaders, hungry for change, are braving a political hornet’s nest and how you can ensure the end of Hyde.
Speakers (click to view): Morgan Hopkins (She/Her), Bianca Campbell (She/Her and They/Them), Tabitha Skervin (Zie/Zir)

#BeBoldEndHyde: The Movement to End the Hyde Amendment

Speakers

Morgan Hopkins (She/Her)

Morgan Hopkins creates synthesis between the state, federal, and field work of the All* Above All public education campaign. Previously, she worked at the National Network of Abortion Funds. Morgan has a B.A. with Honors in Psychology from Hobart and William Smith Colleges and a Masters in Psychology with a certificate in Women's Studies from the University of Houston-Clear Lake. She is a proud member of the #BeyHive.

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Bianca Campbell (She/Her and They/Them)

Bianca Campbell works with the National Network of Abortion Funds, prompting members to not only fund abortion, provide rides and lodging -- but also to build power that wins the hearts, minds and support of communities and shifts policy. Locally, she helps grow the Access Reproductive Care - Southeast as well!

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Tabitha Skervin (Zie/Zir)

Tabitha Skervin is a Jamaican-born femme living on occupied Lenni-Lenape territory (i.e. Philadelphia). For the past 7 years, Tabitha has been organizing for environmental and social justice, grounding zir’s approach in a vision for collective liberation. Tabitha is currently Community Mobilization Coordinator at Women's Medical Fund, leading the fund’s advocacy efforts to eliminate all barriers to abortion access.

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ArtMoves: Love, Sex, Family & Community
What if we regularly spent time making art? What sort of untapped potential might we unlock? What kinds of new images and visions might we create? How might art and activism come together to make those visions a reality? Exploring your work and lives through different artistic mediums, participants will create art and practice visioning how we get the Love, Sex, Family & Community that we all need and deserve. Open to artists, activists, and those who identify as both!
Speakers (click to view): Sandra Criswell (She/Her), Jennifer Warren (She/Her), Rachel J. Brooks (She/Her)

ArtMoves: Love, Sex, Family & Community

Speakers

Jennifer Warren (She/Her)

Jennifer Warren brings her passion for reproductive justice and her talent for connecting people to CoreAlign in her role as a regional organizer. Based in Memphis, TN, she works to build and strengthen relationships within the southern repro movement. Prior to joining CoreAlign, Jennifer educated young people on their reproductive health, accumulating more than 20 years of experience working with adolescents, and more than 15 years of experience working in the field of HIV/AIDS, STI and pregnancy prevention. When not organizing and convening, she is either spending time with her loving family, singing at church, or cooking delicious meals.

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Rachel J. Brooks (She/Her)

Rachel J Brooks is a Training Coordinator at CoreAlign, where she works to ensure that all people have the resources, rights, and respect to make decisions regarding their sexual and reproductive health. Rachel also serves as the Steering Committee Chair for Healthy and Free Tennessee, a coalition working to advance sexual healthy and reproductive freedom across the state.

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Birth Is More Than A Moment: Birth Justice In Our Communities
This panel will explore how control over birthing experiences has been a part of the broader fight for reproductive rights and body sovereignty. Speakers will discuss their experiences with birth INjustices and with creating experiences of birth justice. We will address racism's role in health disparities, reclaiming our traditional knowledge, efforts to expand community-based and full-spectrum models of care, mental healthcare and depression, and holding the movement accountable to the full spectrum of birthing experiences (including abortion, loss, and postpartum). We will highlight the need for education, access, and support for marginalized pregnant/birthing/parenting people, including people of color, incarcerated people, and rural folks. People in our communities may have the least access to quality care and birth options, but the greatest need.
Speakers (click to view): Mollie Hartford (She/Her), La Loba Loca (She/They/Loba), Marisa Pizii (She/Her), Monica Simpson (She/Her)

Birth Is More Than A Moment: Birth Justice In Our Communities

Speakers

Mollie Hartford (She/Her)

Mollie Hartford is a Childbirth Educator, a mother, and a Hampshire Alum. When she’s not knitting reproductive anatomy or hats that look like pigeons, she is working to make sure that mothers have the tools in place to care for themselves and their families, and that communities realize their responsibility in raising the next generation.

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La Loba Loca (She/They/Loba)

La Loba Loca is based in so-called Los Angeles. Loba is a Queer Machona South American Migrant, zine maker, writer, tattooist, crafter, full spectrum companion, aspiring midwife student, seed-saver, and gardener. La Loba Loca is invested in disseminating information with the hope that self-knowledge and (re)cognition of #abuelitaknowledge will create a future where we can depend on ourselves and communities. La Loba Loca’s core philosophy is based on (re)claiming and (re)membering Abuelita Knowledge and learning how to use our roots as a tool for liberation and transformation. IG:@lalobalocashares,lalobaloca.com, facebook.com/lalobaloca, lalobaloca.bigcartel.com

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Marisa Pizii (She/Her)

Marisa Pizii is the Director of Programs with The Prison Birth Project. In addition to her work for reproductive and birth justice, Marisa has a deep commitment to the vision of a community where human rights and love are part of the core operating principles of people and policies.

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Monica Simpson (She/Her)

Monica Raye Simpson is the Executive Director of SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. A native of rural North Carolina, Monica is deeply invested in southern movement building and the fight for Black liberation. She is also committed to birth justice as a certified Doula. Monica couples her activism with her artistry and created SisterSong's first program focused on creating innovative culture shift strategies. Because of her “artivism” Monica was named as a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine and chosen as one of Advocate Magazine’s 40 under 40 leaders.

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Boston Doula Project: A Case Study on Reclaiming Space for BIPOCs
This is a closed session for black, indigenous and people of color (BIPOC) to explore the challenges faced by BIPOCs when working with a white feminist approach to reproductive health organizing. Boston Doula Project will offer a brief overview of its history and share strategies around reclaiming spaces for BIPOC with attention to relational building, affinity spaces and organizing against oppressive dynamics. We are committed to centering and uplifting the voices of black womxn, trans and non-binary people.
Speakers (click to view): Janhavi Madabushi (They/Them), Mary Durden

Boston Doula Project: A Case Study on Reclaiming Space for BIPOCs

Speakers

Janhavi Madabushi (They/Them)

Janhavi Madabushi is a South Indian immigrant, queer and nonbinary person. They are a full-spectrum doula, a racial justice organizer and a yoga teacher trainee who works in the Boston metro area.

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Mary Durden

Mary Durden is a queer, black woman fighting to uplift survivors of oppression. She volunteers for the Boston Doula Project, an abortion doula collective that provides nonjudgmental support for people experiencing abortion. She is also the Communications and Outreach Manager at Ibis Reproductive Health where she works on the Free the Pill campaign to make a birth control pill available over the counter in the US.

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Embodied Leadership
This workshop will demonstrate simple steps participants can take to attune to the embodied, relational, and emotional aspects of your nervous system. In doing so, we integrate the intelligence of the body into our activism, organizing, leading, and education work. We deepen our capacity to connect across difference, and we create access to greater cognitive functioning.
Speakers (click to view): Jamila Umi Jackson (She/Her)

Embodied Leadership

Speakers

Jamila Umi Jackson (She/Her)

Jamila Jackson is a dancer and community organizer. Originally from the San Francisco Bay Area and a Hampshire College Alum, her work focuses on youth leadership, embodiment, healing, and community building.

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How Do Families Resist?
Building on past conversations at CLPP within COFFEE (Conference on Feminist Families, Equality, and Experiences), we want to create a space to wrestle with the intersections of personal, political, and familial in our new political reality. Beginning November 9th, it’s arguable that all the issues surrounding family feel different (and maybe are different) than before. Join us — we’ll discuss differentiating the urgent and the important, asking how we prioritize, find joy, gather strength and continue to move forward in a time of resistance. We will also tackle practical topics like what does family activism look like and how to talk to our kids about Trump and this moment in American history, including rising rates of bigotry in the country.
Speakers (click to view): Avital Norman Nathman (She/Her), Natasha Vianna, Tope Fadiran

How Do Families Resist?

Speakers

Avital Norman Nathman (She/Her)

Avital Norman Nathman is the editor of The Good Mother Myth: Redefining Motherhood to Fit Reality, and a freelance writer who reports on everything from parenting to pop culture and pot. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, Cosmopolitan.com, Rolling Stone, The Establishment and more.

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Natasha Vianna

Natasha Vianna is a rebelde in tech, a repro justice activist, and co-founder of #NoTeenShame.

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Tope Fadiran

Tope Fadiran Charlton is a writer and researcher whose work addresses the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in American culture. She is a research fellow with Political Research Associates, a progressive social justice think tank. Her work has been featured by TIME.com, The Guardian, Salon, Bitch Magazine, and other outlets.

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- Private group -
Mother Who Works the Land - Decolonizing Reproductive Justice and Building Collective Voice on Land, Body and Place
This interactive workshop is intended to provide a forum where reproductive justice is explored through the lens of Indigenous and land based peoples. Through the facilitation of Trauma Rocks, a multigenerational story of trauma and resiliency, we will provide a space that is both experiential and visual for participants to understand the fundamental connections of land and bodies. By exploring environmental and reproductive justice, participants will build collective understanding, and voice the implications of place, land and body within their work. Throughout the discussion, participants will be led through breath and movements as a way to encourage healthy embodiment, self-care and exploration of story.
Speakers (click to view): Jessica Riggs (She/Her), Nathana Bird (She/Her), Steph McCreary (She/Her)

Mother Who Works the Land - Decolonizing Reproductive Justice and Building Collective Voice on Land, Body and Place

Speakers

Jessica Riggs (She/Her)

Jessica Riggs is a passionate advocate for reproductive and birth justice and has made it her mission to provide compassionate and culturally appropriate doula care to the families in her community. She is committed to working in the intersections of indigenous women’s health, reproductive justice, environmental justice, and ending violence against girls, women, and Mother Earth. She lives in rural Northern New Mexico, where she is a co-parenting mother of a beloved son.

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Nathana Bird (She/Her)

Nathana Bird, M.A., is a mother from Ohkay Owingeh and Kewa pueblos in NM and the Women’s Leadership & Economic Freedom Program Manager at Tewa Women United. In the last 3 years with TWU, Ms. Bird has worked primarily with our A'Gin Healthy Sexuality and Body Sovereignty Project in local public and tribal schools.

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Steph McCreary (She/Her)

Steph McCreary works as the Doula Project Coordinator for Tewa Women United in rural northern New Mexico. As an instructor of Kundalini Yoga, she is interested in how embodiment, meditation, and healing practices can be woven into our work within the social & reproductive justice movements.

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The Revolution Starts with Me: Recipes, Remedies, Rituals and Resources for Activist Self Care
Newly revised for 2017, this session brings together new and seasoned activists who are dedicated to making community and societal change, AND who are faced with the too-real task of balancing the demands of families, peers, and communities. We are committed to creating a balance between advocating for others and taking care of ourselves. But how do we prioritize self care when we’re being pulled in multiple directions? And what can we do when self care doesn’t feel like an option? Through collaborative activities, storytelling, and skill-sharing, we will examine the effects of burnout at the individual, community, institutional, systemic, and generational levels. You will develop a personalized “Recipes, Remedies, Rituals, and Resources”, and you’ll receive the 2017 "The Revolution Starts with Me: Recipes, Remedies, Rituals, and Resources”, a self care zine with tools, exercises, and advice from the presenters.
Speakers (click to view): Nicole Clark M.S.W. (She/Her)

The Revolution Starts with Me: Recipes, Remedies, Rituals and Resources for Activist Self Care

Speakers

Nicole Clark M.S.W. (She/Her)

Nicole Clark is a licensed social worker, independent consultant and Reproductive Justice activist who uses the RJ framework with nonprofits, government agencies, and community groups to design, implement, and evaluate programs, services and campaign that raises the voices and lived experiences of women and girls of color. Nicole is based in Brooklyn, New York.

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We Testify: Our Abortion Stories
Almost a third of people who can become pregnant will have an abortion by age 45, and most people only tell 1 or 2 people in their lives. As people who have abortions, we often experience shame and stigma from our communities, society, and even ourselves. In this closed session for people who have had abortions, we will hold space with one another, learn about abortion stigma and how it impacts our experiences, and share our stories. This workshop is led by We Testify, a program of the National Network of Abortion Funds, which seeks to build the leadership of people who’ve had abortions.
Speakers (click to view): Jack Qu'emi Gutierrez (They/Them), Sharon Lagos

We Testify: Our Abortion Stories

Speakers

Saturday Session 1: 1:15PM - 2:45PM

A Media Makers Roundtable on Racial Justice
From articulating the needs of our communities to affirming our multi-faceted lives, to visioning new worlds and just futures, media-makers play an integral role in our movements. Join this distinguished panel of media makers using multi-pronged media strategies, written communications, podcasts, music, performance, and multi-media art to make critical political and cultural interventions that guide our activist movements.
Speakers (click to view): Sasha Alexander. (He/She/They), Pamela Merritt (She/Her), Shanelle Matthews (She/Her), Taja Lindley (She/Her), Verónica Bayetti Flores (She/Her)

A Media Makers Roundtable on Racial Justice

Speakers

Sasha Alexander. (He/She/They)

Sasha Alexander. is a trans black/south asian, artist, educator, and healer whose worked at the intersections of lgbtq, youth, media, economic, gender and racial justice movements for almost 20 years. Sasha is the founder of Black Trans Media and works as the Membership Director at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project (SRLP). Sasha uses the pronouns he/she/they and insists you mix it up.

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Pamela Merritt (She/Her)

Pamela Merritt is co-founder and co-director of Reproaction, a new direct action group forming to increase access to abortion and advance reproductive justice. Merritt blogs at AngryBlackBitch.com, and is a founding member of the Trust Black Women Partnership. She has been a featured contributor on National Public Radio (NPR), and her writing has been published in the Chicago Sun-Times, Rewire, Rolling Stone, and The Guardian.

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Shanelle Matthews (She/Her)

Shanelle Matthews is an award-winning political communications strategist with a decade of experience in journalism as well as legislative, litigation, rapid response, and campaign communications. She serves as the Director of Communications for the Black Lives Matter Global Network, organizing to end state-sanctioned violence against Black people by building power and winning immediate improvements in the lives of Black people.

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Taja Lindley (She/Her)

Taja Lindley is a healer, artist, and writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She is the Founder and Managing Member of Colored Girls Hustle, and a member of Echoing Ida and Harriet's Apothecary. Her writing has appeared in EBONY, Salon, Rewire and YES! Magazine. www.TajaLindley.com / www.ColoredGirlsHustle.com

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Verónica Bayetti Flores (She/Her)

Verónica Bayetti Flores is a writer, consultant, and cultural critic. She has led national policy and movement building work at the intersections of immigrants’ rights, health care access, police accountability, and LGBTQ liberation. She is co-host of Latinx music podcast Radio Menea, Managing Partner at the Center for Advancing Innovative Policy, and Co-President of the Board of Directors of the National Network of Abortion Funds.

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Building our Future: Trials and Triumphs of Being Radical From the Inside Out
Hear directly from currently incarcerated individuals and build strategy and support with Justice Now activists in this interactive session. Presenters will share their vision of abolition and inspiring resilience through stories of the trials and triumphs of being radical from the inside out. Join us as we dream beyond prison walls to build a future free of prisons and state violence where families are whole and communities are supported.
Speakers (click to view): Misty Rojo (She/Her or They/Them), Allie Cislo (She/Her or They/Them)

Building our Future: Trials and Triumphs of Being Radical From the Inside Out

Speakers

Misty Rojo (She/Her or They/Them)

Misty Rojo comes to prison abolition work after leaving home at 14 and ultimately leaving an abusive relationship at 23, only to end up serving a 10 year prison sentence. While incarcerated, Misty was mentored by true activists and survivors, learning the meaning of self-determination and resilience. Misty's work focuses on campaigns to build coalitions and bring about policy change using an intersectional prison abolition framework. Misty has sponsored two California state bills that directly impact people in CA women's prisons and their families, and continues to work in collaboration with CA RJ groups to expand reproductive rights and access to care in prisons.

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Allie Cislo (She/Her or They/Them)

Allie Cislo works at Justice Now, where she raises funds to dismantle and abolish the prison-industrial complex in solidarity with people in CA women's prisons. A queer Jewish anti-occupation organizer, full-spectrum doula, and sex educator, Allie is passionate about bringing attention and energy to the intersection of reproductive justice and the many manifestations of incarceration worldwide.

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Deeds Not Words: Building Intergenerational Intersectional Activism Campaigns
Wendy Davis stood on the Texas Senate floor for 13 hours as she filibustered a conservative bill that would decimate the right of Texas women to access reproductive services. Since then, she’s built Deeds Not Words, a nonprofit focused on empowering the next generation to achieve equality for women. Our approach is intersectional. With a coalition of partners across various issues, we connect young people to campaigns and legislative efforts they can plug into; and in turn, we lift up the creativity and passion young people have to change the world. Young people are invited to learn core components of campaign building, activist and organizing best practices, and how to utilize your creativity and innovation as only your generations can. Everyone is invited to explore the power of intergenerational organizing as we build programming to train and mobilize students to advocate for what they believe in. We believe in engaging and listening to our young #Changemakers in order to provide them with tools to make lasting change.
Speakers (click to view): Wendy Davis (She/Her)

Deeds Not Words: Building Intergenerational Intersectional Activism Campaigns

Speakers

Wendy Davis (She/Her)

Wendy Davis is a former Texas State Senator. Known for her 13 hour filibuster to stop a sweeping anti-abortion bill, Davis founded Deeds Not Words last year to empower young women as the next generation of gender equity activists.

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Feelin' Good: Deconstructing Pleasure and Identity
Sex occupies a strange place in our current culture, at once something desirable, a commodity, and a taboo. But what about pleasure? What are some associations we have with the word pleasure? Where do they come from? How do gender roles fit into personal understanding of pleasure? Through communal writing exercises, visual art, and group discussion, participants will explore how compulsive masculinity and femininity, as well as other aspects of hegemonic identity (race, class, ability, religions, status as a victim/survivor of assault, etc.), contribute to our individual concepts of pleasure, our personal relationship to pleasure, and the roles we take on with regard to talking about sex and having sex.
Speakers (click to view): Christina Tesoro (She/Her)

Feelin' Good: Deconstructing Pleasure and Identity

Speakers

Christina Tesoro (She/Her)

Christina Tesoro is a sex educator and writer from Queens, NY. She works with youth at Mount Sinai's Adolescent Health Center, focusing on sexual violence awareness and prevention, healthy sexuality and relationships, and strives to provide comprehensive sex ed particularly for QTPOC youth.

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Moving From Desperation to Empowerment: Finding Your Place in Supporting People Who End Their Own Pregnancies
The future of abortion access is more uncertain than it has been in two generations. But instead of hopelessness, the seismic political shift has ignited interest in community-based and self-directed solutions. Uncertain times provide an unprecedented opportunity for creative and daring activism. Each of us has a role to play -- from destigmatizing self-induced abortion, to distributing information about how to end a pregnancy, to providing doula care to people who do. This session will provide an overview of legal issues surrounding self-induced abortion and will empower participants to assess the potential risks and rewards to their activism to support people who end their own pregnancies.
Speakers (click to view): Farah Diaz-Tello (She/Her), Melissa Mikesell (She/Her), Kebé (She/Her), Emily R. Champlin (She/Her)

Moving From Desperation to Empowerment: Finding Your Place in Supporting People Who End Their Own Pregnancies

Speakers

Farah Diaz-Tello (She/Her)

Farah Diaz-Tello is Senior Counsel for the SIA Legal Team, where she wields law and policy tools to ensure that people can end their pregnancies with dignity without fear of arrest. Her career as a lawyer has been dedicated to the service of Reproductive Justice and Birth Justice. She’s a proud Texpat and mother of boys who love CLPP and justice.

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Melissa Mikesell (She/Her)

Melissa Mikesell is the Director of the Self-Induced Abortion (“SIA”) Legal Team, a consortium of organizations with an ambitious multi-year strategy to halt the criminalization of abortion, particularly in circumstances where a person ends their own pregnancy outside of the formal health care system. She has more than 15 years’ experience working in the social and economic justice movements and fighting for marginalized communities, including as the West Coast Director for a national civil rights and justice organization. She has co-authored a number of publications on SIA, including an amicus brief on behalf of Reproductive Justice organizations in Purvi Patel’s appeal, a legal primer on SIA, as well as an article on SIA that has been accepted for publication in the Georgetown Journal of Gender and the Law.

Groups audience: 

Kebé (She/Her)

Kebé is an organizer who has used both legal advocacy and community organizing to build toward reproductive justice. She has worked with legal advocates to oppose state punishment of marginalized pregnant and parenting people, and sees community organizing as a powerful tool to increase access to abortion and oppose state violence in our communities.

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Emily R. Champlin (She/Her)

Emily R. Champlin is a lifelong feminist and social justice advocate. After receiving her BA in Feminist Studies, she worked as a domestic violence advocate focusing on LGBTQ survivors. Throughout law school, she was avidly involved in studying and promoting reproductive justice. As a Fellow, her work focuses on the intersecting barriers of racism, limited English proficiency, immigration status, and cultural competency in accessing comprehensive health care.

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Muslims and Reproductive Justice: Empowering our Community through Dismantling Stereotypes
Submissive. Oppressed. Conservative. Words consistently used to describe Muslim women in the age of mass Islamophobia. HEART Women and Girls will use a reproductive justice framework to discuss how stereotypes influence the lived experiences of Muslim people, deconstruct the Muslim American community, and present ways to empower (ourselves or others who are) Muslim survivors of sexual violence in the current age of Islamophobia.
Speakers (click to view): Sadia Arshad (She/Her), Sahar Pirzada (She/Her)

Muslims and Reproductive Justice: Empowering our Community through Dismantling Stereotypes

Speakers

Sadia Arshad (She/Her)

Sadia Arshad is a reproductive justice nerd working in health communications during the day and doing youth empowerment and community engagement work at night. She fell into this work by accident and couldn't be happier.

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Sahar Pirzada (She/Her)

Sahar Pirzada is a graduate student with the University of Southern California Masters of Social Work program. She is the Programs and Outreach Manager for HEART Women & Girls and is passionate about creating safe spaces for Muslim survivors of sexual violence.

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New Voices for Reproductive Justice (Philadelphia)
Join New Voices for Reproductive Justice in celebrating the growth of our movements and planning for continued expansion. Come to unpack key organizational strategies and movement insights through listening to presenters, engaging with media, group work and collective application. Using New Voices expansion programs in Philadelphia and Cleveland as a model, participants will learn about and interactively engage with central movement-building approaches such as: leadership development, integrated voter engagement, community organizing, and policy advocacy in the context of Reproductive Justice. Participants will engage with the complexities of turf navigation, program implementation, base-building, leadership recruitment, cross-state collaboration, and actualized allyship.
Speakers (click to view): Lexi J. White (She/Her), Ash Chan (She/Her), Jasmine Burnett (She/Her)

New Voices for Reproductive Justice (Philadelphia)

Speakers

Lexi J. White (She/Her)

Lexi White is a health and wellness human rights advocate, community organizer, writer-poet and social justice scholar-activist. She focuses on Reproductive Justice and sexual and reproductive health and policy, rooting her work in the experiences and liberation of Black Women, Women of Color, and LGBTQ+ People of Color.

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Ash Chan (She/Her)

Ash Chan, a Pittsburgh transplant by way of the Bay Area, is a queer youth organizer dedicated to education justice, equity and holistic wellness. Through leadership development and the sharing of lived experiences, Ash aims to create brave, youth-centered spaces to educate, affirm, and empower young folx of color with the skills and resources to become leaders in their schools, communities, and lives. Ash aspires for a long-term career in public health at the intersections of reproductive justice, human rights & environmental sustainability

Groups audience: 

Jasmine Burnett (She/Her)

Jasmine Burnett is a writer, consultant, social justice strategist, and entrepreneur who works as Director of Community Organizing with New Voices for Reproductive Justice. As a writer with Echoing Ida, a Black women's writing collective and program of Forward Together, she has been published on issues reflecting the range of Black women's leadership and visibility. As a creative, Jasmine is currently in the 7th cohort of Generative Fellows with the CoreAlign Generative Fellowship. She is also a 2017 fellow with the Rockwood Leadership Fellowship for Leaders in Reproductive, Health, Rights, & Justice.

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On the Phone and On the Web - The Challenges of National Grassroots Organizing
No salaries, no travel stipends, and no face-time. Leadership targeted by institutional violence, with changing phone numbers, no wifi and limited tech competency. Are you a community organizer committed to building national movements led by and for marginalized populations? These are examples of what we face. In this strategic session, facilitated by leaders of national organizations devoted to grassroots social justice activism, we will create space for individuals involved in national grassroots activism to share their trials, tribulations and triumphs, and we will brainstorm strategies to successfully include and engage our communities in the movements to effect social change.
Speakers (click to view): Katherine M. Koster (She/Her), Alex Andrews (She/Her)

On the Phone and On the Web - The Challenges of National Grassroots Organizing

Speakers

Katherine M. Koster (She/Her)

Katherine M. Koster has been involved in community organizing, education, and advocacy for women for over 6 years. In addition to working for SWOP-USA, she serves on the board of SWOP Behind Bars where she manages responding to letters from and meeting the needs of incarcerated women with sex trade experience.

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Alex Andrews (She/Her)

As a formerly incarcerated sex worker and the co founder for SWOP Behind Bars, Alex Andrews knew it was critical to start reaching men and women who were experiencing the harm of the criminalization of sex work. As the North American Representative for NSWP, Alex hopes to amplify the voices of incarcerated sex workers around the world.

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Population Control: Reproductive INjustice Coming from the Right and the Left
The right to choose not to have children is only a part of the fight for reproductive freedom. Policing communities of color through forced sterilizations, by denying access to reproductive services, and controlling family formation through social services and regulation of those deemed “unfit to parent” are all part of the historical legacy and ongoing practices of population control. Presenters will analyze domestic and international population control interventions by both state and non-state actors that target women of color, incarcerated women, and disabled people. Tactics that scapegoat immigrants for environmental problems or that rationalize the denial of reproductive rights as a conservation ethic and necessary means to address climate change will be addressed. Participants will walk away with a deeper understanding of the right to birth and parent as an integral component of reproductive justice.
Speakers (click to view): Ellen E. Foleu (She/Her), Jade S. Sasser (She/Her), Rajani Bhatia (She/Her)

Population Control: Reproductive INjustice Coming from the Right and the Left

Speakers

Jade S. Sasser (She/Her)

Jade S. Sasser is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Riverside. She is currently writing a book about why population debates are becoming popular in the context of climate change. Her broader research interests include climate justice, international development, women’s health, and the intersections between gender and technology.

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Rajani Bhatia (She/Her)

Rajani Bhatia's research interests lie at the intersection of reproductive technologies, health, bioethics and biomedicine. Her first book published by University of Washington Press on the topic of lifestyle sex selection is forthcoming.

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Reproductive Justice 101
Reproductive Justice was coined in 1994 by Women of African Descent for Reproductive Justice, a group of Black women who recognized that the white-led women's rights movement was not prioritizing issues critical to women of color, and that we must represent our own communities. This workshop will discuss a little bit of the history of RJ as well as give participants a chance to express their RJ stories. The workshop also involves understanding what's at stake for folk who are often left out of reproductive justice considerations such as trans women and trans non-binary folks.
Speakers (click to view): Ashley Williams

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers
Stigma Free Parenting
A central tenant of reproductive justice is the ability to decide if and when to have children. But many people in our communities face stigma--stigma that is compounded by their parental status. Parents in our communities are targeted with constant critical scrutiny and are threatened with losing their parental rights. How can we, as a community, unite to reduce stigma attached to parenting--based on race, health status, immigration, age, incarceration experience, and sexuality? Panelists will discuss their experiences as parents who face stigma and working with scrutinized parents in order to explore the universality of parenting, the unique challenges that some families face, and ways that we are creating supportive communities for families.
Speakers (click to view): Jaspreet Chowdhary (She/Her), Lorena García Zermeño (She/Her), Kenzie Wood, Sequoia Ayala (She/Her), Shantell V. Gomez (She/Her), Jasmine Errico (She/Her)

Stigma Free Parenting

Speakers

Jaspreet Chowdhary (She/Her)

Jaspreet Chowdhary received a B.A. in English and Women’s Studies from Goucher College, a M.P.H. in Epidemiology from Tulane University, and a J.D. from Seattle University School of Law. She is currently the Senior Policy Specialist at the 30 for 30 campaign. She was part of the inaugural class of the If/When/How Fellowship program and was placed at the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum.

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Lorena García Zermeño (She/Her)

Lorena García Zermeño is the Program Coordinator for California Latinas for Reproductive Justice where she spearheads their long-term initiative, Justice for Young Families (J4YF). She studied Anthropology and Feminist Studies at UC Santa Cruz with a concentration in Law, Politics, and Social Change. RJ has helped her learn to channel her voice and passion for social justice into advocacy work and be unapologetically chingona.

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Sequoia Ayala (She/Her)

Sequoia Ayala received her law degree and master’s degree in International Relations from the American University Washington College of Law and School of International Service, respectively. As the Law and Policy Fellow at SisterLove, Sequoia works collaboratively with community members, elected officials, and policymakers in advancement of the health, well-being, and human rights of Black women living with HIV/AIDS, those at risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, and for all individuals who belong to marginalized communities that are severely and disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS, especially in the Deep South and Global South. Additionally, she is a Georgia licensed attorney who provides low-cost legal assistance in family law and immigration. A proud University of Georgia alumna and native Georgian, Sequoia resides in Atlanta with her husband and two sons.

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Shantell V. Gomez (She/Her)

Shantell V. Gomez is a member of California Latinas for Reproductive Justice’s Young Parent Leaders Council (YPLC). She is a fierce young parent advocate and proud momma to her 4-year-old son, Aidan. Shantell works part-time while studying English at Mount Saint Mary’s University in Los Angeles and is planning on pursuing a master’s degree to obtain her teaching credentials.

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Jasmine Errico (She/Her)

Jasmine is a full spectrum doula, childbirth educator and proud parent. A student at Holyoke Community College, she is a RRASC alumni and currently works with Prison Birth Project in Holyoke, Massachusetts. Her reproductive justice activism focuses on providing free accessible support to parents at the intersection of poverty, incarceration and substance use.

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Talking with Conservative Friends and Family about Abortion
It’s common to feel frustrated, angry, and/or drained by conversations with people we care about who hold deeply conservative views on reproductive health and especially abortion. Especially when it’s close family or friends, the disconnection can be very painful. Often the differences involve religious beliefs, which can be particularly hard to negotiate. Often the sense of urgency and passion we feel is at odds with the reality that changing deeply held beliefs is an uncertain and often extremely slow process. In this interactive workshop, we will explore approaches and skills for having more productive conversations across ideological divides. We will review research on how liberals and conservatives construct morality differently, share experiences, and consider some new approaches. We will also examine different ways of defining success in these interactions. with the twin goals of reducing cultural stigma against abortion and maintaining (or maybe even improving) these potentially challenging relationships.
Speakers (click to view): Rev. Rob Keithan (He/His), Parisa Parsa (She/Her), Madeline Blodgett (They/Them)

Talking with Conservative Friends and Family about Abortion

Speakers

Rev. Rob Keithan (He/His)

Rev. Rob Keithan is a faith organizing and training consultant specializing in reproductive health, rights and justice, intercultural communication, and congregational social justice programs. He is currently focused on long-term culture change related to abortion and reproductive health in ways that engage the complex issues related to religion, morality, and race.

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Parisa Parsa (She/Her)

Parisa Parsa is Executive Director of Essential Partners. Advancing the work of Public Conversations Project, Essential Partners offers facilitation and training for communities building the skills and courage to connect across differences of identity, ideology, and values. From abortion to Israel/Palestine to guns, our approach works with any issue where people find themselves at odds with friends, neighbors and family. We equip communities and their leaders to come together to build trust and understanding that can lead to new solutions, even where ideological agreement may not be possible. Parisa also is a Qualified Administrator of the Intercultural Development Inventory and works with individuals and groups seeking to develop their ability to relate and build shared meaning across cultural differences. Parisa has been a Unitarian Universalist minister for 19 years, and lives with her family in Arlington, MA.

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Madeline Blodgett (They/Them)

Madeline Blodgett is a researcher, advocate, and facilitator working to create sustained culture change around reproduction. Madeline is the Capacity Building Director at the Sea Change Program, partnering with artists, researchers, activists, and organizations to conceptualize, measure, and act on reproductive stigma.

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Saturday Session 2: 3:15PM - 4:45PM

Artivism 101: How Arts and Culture Are Integral to Our Fight for Reproductive Freedom
In order to build new futures, we must first imagine them. And it will take creativity to address long-standing problems facing our communities. Now, more than ever, the role of artists and cultural workers are essential in our social movements. In this session, we will identify and discuss how artists and cultural workers work on their own and partner with institutions to create performances, illustrations and other works that advance reproductive freedom. Using the technology of improvisation and freestyle, the workshop will culminate with the sacred tradition of the cypher. We will devise mantras, call and responses, poetry, rap, rhythm and movement to co-create a collective freedom song that honors our visions for bodily autonomy and reproductive justice.
Speakers (click to view): Taja Lindley (She/Her)

Artivism 101: How Arts and Culture Are Integral to Our Fight for Reproductive Freedom

Speakers

Taja Lindley (She/Her)

Taja Lindley is a healer, artist, and writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She is the Founder and Managing Member of Colored Girls Hustle, and a member of Echoing Ida and Harriet's Apothecary. Her writing has appeared in EBONY, Salon, Rewire and YES! Magazine. www.TajaLindley.com / www.ColoredGirlsHustle.com

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Beyond Ramps and Rights: Disability and Its Significance for Social Justice Movements
Plenty of disabled/chronically ill folks are an integral part of all communities, resistance movements, history and cultures. Yet we still largely exist relegated to the margins and the cracks of even progressive spaces. Truth is: social justice movement can’t effectively fight homo/transphobia, misogyny, racism or be in solidarity with immigration, or Sovereignty struggles without a working understanding of Ableism. Why? Because it works as a mechanism of white supremacy, colonialism, eugenics, sexual violence, capitalism and the state control of bodies. Not exactly sure how this is true? Come find out! Become part of a growing movement of progressive communities working to deliberately integrate a disability justice practice into the core of their work.
Speakers (click to view): Sebastian Margaret (They/Them), Xautle Alba-Pizaña (They/Them)

Beyond Ramps and Rights: Disability and Its Significance for Social Justice Movements

Speakers

Sebastian Margaret (They/Them)

Sebastian Margaret is an anti-ableism/disability justice community educator. A Disabled TGNC queer immigrant, they are kept deliciously exhausted and hopeful parenting a pair of gorgeous kids. They are passionate about the validity and glory of imperfect body/minds and eroding the exclusion and segregation faced by disabled folks in progressive spaces. Sebastian has been inserting/revealing disability justice issues into progressive movements, and supporting multi-issue capacity and vibrancy in disability communities for decades. sebastian@eqnm.org

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Xautle Alba-Pizaña (They/Them)

Xautle Alba-Pizaña is a multiply disabled undocumented entity, pushing for single issue efforts to be developed into movements that see the human experience as complex as it truly is.

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Blood, Memories and other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice
Memories are carried between generations in various ways. Many of us, cultural workers, full spectrum birth workers and Reproductive Justice organizers of color understand the need to (re)learn and (re)member traditional medicine as we work towards body literacy, autonomy and freedom. Menstruation can be a tool to better understand our bodies, track natural cycles, control fertility and also learn about cultural and familial traditions. In this gathering, we will talk about the importance of cultural preservation and menstrual education in reproductive justice, and we will share knowledge and experiences around holistic menstrual care.
Speakers (click to view): La Loba Loca (She/They/Loba)

Blood, Memories and other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice

Speakers

La Loba Loca (She/They/Loba)

La Loba Loca is based in so-called Los Angeles. Loba is a Queer Machona South American Migrant, zine maker, writer, tattooist, crafter, full spectrum companion, aspiring midwife student, seed-saver, and gardener. La Loba Loca is invested in disseminating information with the hope that self-knowledge and (re)cognition of #abuelitaknowledge will create a future where we can depend on ourselves and communities. La Loba Loca’s core philosophy is based on (re)claiming and (re)membering Abuelita Knowledge and learning how to use our roots as a tool for liberation and transformation. IG:@lalobalocashares,lalobaloca.com, facebook.com/lalobaloca, lalobaloca.bigcartel.com

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Contraceptive Equity: Safety, Access, and Reproductive Justice
This session will center a discussion on contraceptive equity and reproductive freedom as it relates to the core of reproductive justice. In order to build a broad picture of contraceptive equity and bodily autonomy, panelists will address marketing, counseling, and prescription of contraceptives within a context of racism, sexism and cissexism, and reproductive coercion and oppression. In order to move towards freedom, we must understand the inequities prescribed by the targeted marketing and disproportionate prescription of LARCs (long-acting reversible contraceptives, such as IUDs and hormonal implants) and hormonal injections. Panelists will discuss access to resources (information, healthcare, and financial support) as necessary for reproductive choice for vulnerable populations, including cis-gender women of color, people living in poverty, and trans men & gender-nonconforming people.
Speakers (click to view): Dr. Krystal Redman (She/Her), Emma Cohen Westbrooke (She/Her), Lyndon Cudlitz (He/Him), Omisade Burney-Scott (She/Her), Whitney Peoples (She/Her)

Contraceptive Equity: Safety, Access, and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Dr. Krystal Redman (She/Her)

Dr. Redman brings over 12 years of experience in managing low-income and women focused public health access and community-based youth development programs. Prior to her current tenure as Executive Director of SPARK Reproductive Justice Now, Dr. Redman served as the Senior Project Director of Maternal and Child Health, at the Georgia Department of Public Health, where she worked on creating greater healthcare access for women throughout the state of Georgia. Dr. Redman received her Bachelors of Science in Sociology from The University of California, Riverside and a Masters of Health Administration from The University of Southern California, Los Angeles. She received her Doctorates of Public Health from Loma Linda University in Loma Linda, California.

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Emma Cohen Westbrooke (She/Her)

Emma Cohen Westbrooke works as a sexuality educator for Planned Parenthood of the Southern Finger Lakes in Ithaca, NY providing justice-oriented sexuality education for rural middle and high school aged folks. Her energy goes towards uplifting and celebrating LGBTQ youth and being a white co-conspirator for racial justice work in her community.

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Lyndon Cudlitz (He/Him)

Lyndon Cudlitz trains healthcare providers, community organizations, and others in providing relevant services for queer & trans individuals. As a result of this work, Planned Parenthood affiliates in Upstate NY are now successfully providing hormone access, as well as other trans-affirming reproductive healthcare. Lyndon’s 16 years in social justice advocacy and LGBTQ health education is strongly informed by his transfeminist and working-class perspectives.

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Omisade Burney-Scott (She/Her)

Omisade is a black, Southern, feminist, mother and healer with decades of experience in nonprofit leadership, philanthropy, and social justice. Grounded in an analysis of systems of oppression; she has trained extensively in identity politics, intersectionality and liberatory organizing practices. Omisade sees herself as an Organizational Development Midwife, facilitating major transitions that social justice nonprofits and groups must make in order to remain relevant, responsive, intentional, healthy and sustainable. As a healer, she is particularly skilled in creating safe and open spaces that facilitate people to dig down deep into their own power and create their own solutions. She is currently the new Director of Partnerships and Advocacy for SisterSong, a national women of color Reproductive Justice collective. Omisade is a 1989 graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel. She is also a tribe member of SpiritHouse and a board member of The Beautiful Project, Village of Wisdom, and Working Films. Omi resides in Durham and is the proud mother of two sons, Che and Taj.

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Whitney Peoples (She/Her)

With fifteen years experience in feminist and critical race research, activism, and teaching, Dr. Whitney Peoples has spoken and written on the intersections of race, gender, and popular culture. She has published critical essays on topics including hip-hop feminism, advertising for oral contraceptives, and representations of women in African American film.

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Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop
A common perception of the Manual Vacuum Aspiration (MVA) abortion is that the procedure is scary, complicated, and intense. The purpose of this Papaya workshop is to debunk this myth and other myths through education and hands-on activities for a non-clinical audience. Using papayas as uterine models, participants will be introduced to and perform their own MVA abortion on a papaya. By gaining a comprehensive understanding of the actual medical procedure through the use of patient-centered language and interactions, participants will be better informed and equipped as abortion activists who can demystify abortion in their own communities and advocates who can create change at the clinic level.
Speakers (click to view): Naomi Legros (She/Her), Lael Greenstein M.D. (She/Her), Laura Riker (She/Her)

Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop

Speakers

Naomi Legros (She/Her)

Naomi Legros is the operations associate at the Reproductive Health Access Project and almost approaching a year with the organization. Her responsibilities support the backbone of the organization, from conference logistics, to HR coordination, website and SEO management, and coordinating RHAP's volunteer program. She is passionate about highlighting reproductive health disparities that are prevalent in communities of color and learning how to maintain intersectionality and inclusivity. Uplifting people of color, especially black womxn is the drive that keeps her going in these trying times.

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Lael Greenstein M.D. (She/Her)

Lael Greenstein, M.D. is the Reproductive Health and Advocacy Fellow at the Tufts University Family Medicine Residency at Cambridge Health Alliance, where she is being trained to become a provider and teacher of full spectrum reproductive health within family medicine. Her areas of interest are underserved medicine, women’s health and improving access to reproductive health within the community health care setting.

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Laura Riker (She/Her)

A background in Women’s Studies and abortion advocacy led Laura Riker to social work school, where she interned at a community health center and learned about about the clinical side of reproductive rights. At the Reproductive Health Access Project, she organizes primary care clinicians from across the country to work together to expand access to comprehensive reproductive health care.

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Learning from the past to make a better future: Five easy things activists can do to save their histories
How did we get started? Was it always like this? Why are we part of this partnership? Have we ever gotten a grant from that organization before? Every day, activists in the field work so hard to make today and tomorrow better that it’s sometimes difficult to pay attention to the past -- or to make sure that we document what we’re doing today. This panel of archivists will discuss how we can all find power from the past and will suggest some easy things we can all do to preserve our stories for the future. You will leave this session equipped with a draft plan for preserving your histories to take back to your organizing work.
Speakers (click to view): Maureen Callahan (She/Her), Jasmine Jones (She/Her), Maggie Schreiner (She/Her)

Learning from the past to make a better future: Five easy things activists can do to save their histories

Speakers

Maureen Callahan (She/Her)

Maureen Callahan is an archivist at the Sophia Smith Collection at Smith College, where she brings in new collections and connects communities with archives. She is committed to memory work as a path to justice, community, self-empowerment and a way to imagine a different future.

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Jasmine Jones (She/Her)

Jasmine Jones is an archivist at Smith College's Special Collections and works with information systems. Jasmine serves as an advisory archivist on the People’s Archive of Police Violence in Cleveland and as a member of the Inclusivity Committee for the Digital Library Federation Forum. She holds an M.S. in Library Science, Archives Concentration and an M.A. in History from Simmons College.

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Maggie Schreiner (She/Her)

Maggie Schreiner is an archivist and public historian, working at the intersection of archives, social justice, and community engagement. Maggie is currently a Project Archivist at New York University, and organizes with Interference Archive and Librarians and Archivists with Palestine.

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Religious Liberty: It's Not Just For the Christian Right
Religious liberty is a central issue of our time. The Christian Right, (having lost on matters of abortion rights and marriage equality in the courts) is increasingly reframing its agenda in terms of religious liberty -- seeking exemptions from the law by stretching and manipulating the meaning of religious liberty in order to legalize discrimination. This workshop aims to equip organizers, activists, journalists, and academics with a basic knowledge of what religious liberty is and isn't, how the Christian Right is employing the term, and how to we need to respond. This interactive session seeks to provide a framework for building the necessary knowledge and skills to confront this political, intellectual, and theological challenge.
Speakers (click to view): Frederick Clarkson (He/Him), Clare Overlander, Cole Parke (They/Them), Glenn H. Northern (He/Him)

Religious Liberty: It's Not Just For the Christian Right

Speakers

Frederick Clarkson (He/Him)

Frederick Clarkson is Senior Fellow at Political Research Associates. He is surprised that he has been researching and writing about the Religious and Political Right for about 3 decades.

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Cole Parke (They/Them)

Cole Parke is the LGBTQ & Gender Justice Researcher at Political Research Associates, a social justice think tank based in Boston. PRA is dedicated to supporting organizers and activists on the Left with info and analysis about right-wing opposition to our collective struggle(s) for liberation.

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Glenn H. Northern (He/Him)

Glenn Northern, domestic program senior associate at Catholics for Choice, builds strategic relationships with prochoice Catholics, policymakers, reproductive health providers, activists and collegial organizations, to promote CFC’s activities and strengthen prochoice advocacy, from a Catholic perspective on the local, state and national levels. Mr. Northern uses his extensive experience in public policy, training and technical assistance to help CFC inform and influence debates on sexual and reproductive rights and health, social justice and religious liberty.

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Revolutionary Mothering: Love By Any Means Necessary
Inspired by the legacy of radical and queer black feminists of the 1970s and ’80s, Revolutionary Mothering places marginalized mothers of color at the center of a world of necessary transformation. The challenges we face as movements working for racial, economic, reproductive, gender, and food justice, as well as anti-violence, anti-imperialist, and queer liberation are the same challenges that many mothers face every day. Mothers from marginalized backgrounds create a generous space for life in the face of oppression and activate a powerful vision of the future while navigating the tangible concerns of the present. Join us for a timely discussion of movement shifting committed to birthing new worlds.
Speakers (click to view): China Martens (She/Her), Mai'a Williams (She/Her), T.K. Tunchez (She/Her)

Revolutionary Mothering: Love By Any Means Necessary

Speakers

China Martens (She/Her)

China Martens is a Baltimore writer and single mother of a 29-year-old. She is the author of “The Future Generation: The Zine-Book for Subculture Parents, Kids, Friends and Others” and the co-editor of "Don't Leave Your Friends Behind: Concrete Ways To Support Families In Social Justice Movements & Communities" and "Revolutionary Mothering: Love On The Front Lines."

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Mai'a Williams (She/Her)

Mai’a Williams is a writer, editor, and visual and performance artist. It was her living and working with Egyptian, Palestinian, Congolese, and Central American indigenous mothers in resistance communities that inspired her life-giving work, radical mothering. She is author of two books of poetry, No God but Ghosts and Monsters and Other Silent Creatures and co-editor of the anthology, Revolutionary Mothering: Love on the Front Lines.

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T.K. Tunchez (She/Her)

T.K. Tunchez is a full-time, multi-media working artist, market organizer, and stone worker. Her main spiritual and artistic discipline is currently focused on creating healing wearable art pieces that incorporate stone allies through her business, Las Ofrendas. She is a budding birth attendant, a mama of two amazing young people, and organizes markets that use alternative economic models to support women and community organizations.

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Social Workers for Reproductive Justice
While some social workers are limited by employment and government policies in discussing reproductive health services, other social workers are limited in their own professional knowledge or by their discomfort in discussing reproductive and sexual health with clients, communities, and organizations. In response to the growing acceptance of the Reproductive Justice framework, Social Workers for Reproductive Justice (SWRJ) was formed to educate professional social workers and students on the Reproductive Justice framework. We need to integrate an intersectional and reproductive justice analysis in our profession and to promote client self-determination in reproductive health care options. Come to network with professional social workers and students, hear SWRJ’s exciting plans, and talk about how social workers are using reproductive justice in our profession!
Speakers (click to view): Nicole Clark M.S.W. (She/Her), Louisa Thanhauser (She/Her), Susan Yanow M.S.W. (She/Her)

Social Workers for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Nicole Clark M.S.W. (She/Her)

Nicole Clark is a licensed social worker, independent consultant and Reproductive Justice activist who uses the RJ framework with nonprofits, government agencies, and community groups to design, implement, and evaluate programs, services and campaign that raises the voices and lived experiences of women and girls of color. Nicole is based in Brooklyn, New York.

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Louisa Thanhauser (She/Her)

Louisa Thanhauser earned her MSW with a concentration in social and economic development and a specialization in policy. She has a background in state-level reproductive health policy and is currently the State Policy Associate at the National Abortion Federation, the professional organization of abortion providers, where her policy and advocacy work is informed by macro-level social work and reproductive justice perspectives.

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Susan Yanow M.S.W. (She/Her)

A long-time reproductive rights activist, Susan Yanow works to expand access to abortion domestically and internationally. She is a co-founder of Women Help Women, an international organization that provides abortion and contraception services and supports women who are self-managing their abortions, and also works with a number of domestic projects that focus on expanding access to abortion.

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Saturday Session 3: 5:15PM - 6:45PM

#NoBanNoWallNoRaids: Arm Yourself with Information for the Frontlines
Have you ever found yourself in a well-meaning political conversation that takes a sudden turn toward the xenophobic? “I’m all for human rights but immigrants are [choose an inaccurate and dangerous stereotype to insert here: stealing our jobs, draining public funds, causing terrorism, etc.].” Come hear from panelists who are from and/or work with immigrant Muslim communities, Latinx communities, AAPI communities, and refugee communities. We will deconstruct myths about immigration and immigrants so that you can go back to your community to advocate for sanctuary status, to explain why it IS a Muslim ban, to protect our moral obligation to resettle refugees, and to articulate how a Wall hurts us all.
Speakers (click to view): Abby Jo Krobot (She/Her), Jeff Napolitano (He/Him), Margie Del Castillo, Sahar Pirzada (She/Her), Miriam Yeung (She/Her)

#NoBanNoWallNoRaids: Arm Yourself with Information for the Frontlines

Speakers

Abby Jo Krobot (She/Her)

Abby Jo Krobot is a Former Refugee AmeriCorps Member at JFSWM. Her duties included being a non-bilingual interpreter, a community advocate, and an ESOL teacher. She is a graduate of Bay Path University.

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Jeff Napolitano (He/Him)

Jeff Napolitano has been the director of the Western Massachusetts program of AFSC for over 8 years, working on issues ranging from antiwar organizing to civil disobedience trainings to sanctuary cities.

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Sahar Pirzada (She/Her)

Sahar Pirzada is a graduate student with the University of Southern California Masters of Social Work program. She is the Programs and Outreach Manager for HEART Women & Girls and is passionate about creating safe spaces for Muslim survivors of sexual violence.

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Miriam Yeung (She/Her)

Miriam Yeung is a proud, queer, AAPI, immigrant, woman activist from Brooklyn, NY who is raising her two daughters to be daring. She's spent most of her time at the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum and the NYC Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender Community Center working on reproductive justice, racial justice, economic justice, immigrant rights, and LGBTI liberation. @miriamyeung

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Appropriate Whiteness
During this workshop, participants will learn how to have difficult conversations about white privilege and white supremacy with the people they love, including families, friends, and co-workers. We'll discuss how to be a "credit to your race" in becoming an abolitionist against racism in the reproductive rights movement, how to actively listen and ask questions of people of color with respect, and how to avoid denial, racial triggers, and marginalization.
Speakers (click to view): Loretta J. Ross (She/Her)

Appropriate Whiteness

Speakers

Loretta J. Ross (She/Her)

Loretta J. Ross was the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012. She helped create the theory of "Reproductive Justice" in 1994 and led a rape crisis center in the 1970s. She co-authored Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice in 2004, and Reproductive Justice: An Introduction in 2017.

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Beyond Inclusivity: Understanding Trans Identities
By focusing on activists in the reproductive justice movement and professionals in the healthcare industry, this workshop will give people without trans experience the language and tools you need to support transgender and individuals personally and professionally. Even when we know support is important, it can be hard to know exactly how our support is needed. Participants will walk away with a deep and broad understanding of struggles people of trans experience may face in their day-to-day lives, as well as in the medical industry and reproductive justice spheres. You will also leave with language and hands-on, realistic, real world strategies for addressing these issues. We will dismantle the gender binary, practice pronoun usage, discuss etiquette surrounding trans identities, and brainstorm strategies for disrupting transphobia.
Speakers (click to view): Emmett DuPont (They/Them)

Beyond Inclusivity: Understanding Trans Identities

Speakers

Emmett DuPont (They/Them)

Emmett DuPont (they/them) is an undergraduate at Hampshire College and lifelong unschooler. Emmett's previous work includes interning at CLPP as well as with local sex educator Yana Tallon-Hicks. They also work closely with COLAGE, the nation's largest organization for queerspawn (children of LGBTQ+ parents), where they facilitate programming teaching queerspawn about everything from self-expression to trans identities.

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Creating Space for People with Disabilities in Reproductive Justice
This identity caucus will center the experiences of activists with disabilities (visible and invisible), chronic pain, etc. in order to host an unapologetic discussion of what the reproductive justice movement needs to include us. The facilitators, who will join us in person and remotely via skype, will lead us in a deep discussion of how reproductive justice organizers can facilitate accessible spaces and how we need to change our conversations about sex education, sexuality, and sexual stigma. We will also look at the way the anti-choice movement has co-opted narratives of disability to push their regressive and harmful agenda. This session is queer-affirming, welcoming activists of all genders, presentations, and sexualities. There will be an ASL interpreter and any materials that are provided will have large-print versions with image descriptions. People without disabilities are invited to attend, listen and learn.
Speakers (click to view): Katie O'Connell (She/Her), Alice Wong (She/Her), Katie Klabusich (She/Her), LaSharn Maelee

Creating Space for People with Disabilities in Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Katie O'Connell (She/Her)

Katie O'Connell is a queer disabled femme who is committed to radical and intersectional organizing that amplifies the voices of folks who are marginalized in social justice movements. She has worked at the NAF Hotline Fund, Planned Parenthood, and Reproaction.

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Alice Wong (She/Her)

Alice Wong is a sociologist, research consultant, and disability activist based in San Francisco, CA. Her areas of interest are accessible healthcare for people with disabilities, Medicaid policies, storytelling, and social media. She is the Founder and Project Coordinator for the Disability Visibility Project (DVP), a community partnership with StoryCorps and an online community dedicated to recording, amplifying, and sharing disability stories and culture.

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Katie Klabusich (She/Her)

Katie Klabusich is a writer, radio host, and social justice activist whose work often focuses on sexuality, reproductive health, mental health, disability, and poverty.

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Creative Resistance: Self and Community Empowerment through Theatre
Research now shows that art can play a role in unwinding the trauma (personal and historical) that is written into our DNA. Come learn about the research surrounding trauma's impact on the brain and body and explore how to use art in the healing process. After building a theoretical foundation, participants will be guided through individual and group theatre games that explore personal relations to trauma, power, and love. As a group, we will build a "creative self-care plan" that will provide practical ways you can build the arts into your daily life to continue unwinding trauma.
Speakers (click to view): Shawn Reilly (They/Them or Ze/Zir)

Creative Resistance: Self and Community Empowerment through Theatre

Speakers

Shawn Reilly (They/Them or Ze/Zir)

Shawn Reilly is in their final year at Vanderbilt University, where they study Human and Organizational Development, with a focus in education and social justice. While there, they have led a successful campaign to gain gender inclusive housing, and is currently organizing for living wages for union workers. Outside of school, Reilly's work centers around healing arts, education justice, labor organizing, and youth development.

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From Urban to Rural to Global: We Need Environmental Justice Everywhere
How do millions of people, disproportionately people of color, forced into living within a mile of dirty energy and toxic producers bear the burden of our fossil fuel addiction with their bodies? How can GPS empower our communities? Panelists will explore the intersections between indigenous sovereignty, and environmental, gender, and racial justice. Presenters will detail governmental policies and activism that perpetuates environmental, climate, and reproductive INjustices in our communities, and innovative efforts that advance just solutions to environmental problems and create community connections to our lived-in and traditional environments.
Speakers (click to view): Elisabeth Lamar (She/Her), Ash Chan (She/Her), Jade S. Sasser (She/Her), Judy Dow (She/Her)

From Urban to Rural to Global: We Need Environmental Justice Everywhere

Speakers

Elisabeth Lamar (She/Her)

Elisabeth Lamar is a volunteer with the Sierra Club, The Climate Reality Project, and the ACLU. She advocates for reproductive, gender and climate justice.

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Ash Chan (She/Her)

Ash Chan, a Pittsburgh transplant by way of the Bay Area, is a queer youth organizer dedicated to education justice, equity and holistic wellness. Through leadership development and the sharing of lived experiences, Ash aims to create brave, youth-centered spaces to educate, affirm, and empower young folx of color with the skills and resources to become leaders in their schools, communities, and lives. Ash aspires for a long-term career in public health at the intersections of reproductive justice, human rights & environmental sustainability

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Jade S. Sasser (She/Her)

Jade S. Sasser is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of California, Riverside. She is currently writing a book about why population debates are becoming popular in the context of climate change. Her broader research interests include climate justice, international development, women’s health, and the intersections between gender and technology.

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Judy Dow (She/Her)

Judy Dow teaches science and history through art to all age levels. She teaches her students how to read the land and do the research necessary to decolonize the science and history they have learned. Mapping the story then creates a new replacement narrative.

Groups audience: 

It's a Class Thing
It's a Class Thing: This interactive workshop will introduce the basics of social class and classism: What is it? Where is it? How does it play out? Group activities, dialogue, and personal reflection will give participants a dynamic way to learn about class, identify systemic examples of classism, and reflect on social class identity in order to bring the topic of class into our communities and movements so we can advance economic and racial justice at its intersection with reproductive justice. Participants will walk away with specific action plans to use in their organizing.
Speakers (click to view): Rachel Rybaczuk (She/Her or They/Them)

It's a Class Thing

Speakers

Rachel Rybaczuk (She/Her or They/Them)

Rachel Rybaczuk is as a queer, white, first-gen, working-class organizer and educator who advances social justice by leading trainings and workshops about class(ism) and race(ism), while highlighting the intersections of all forms of oppression. Rybaczuk’s consulting work with activists, educators, and non-profits is informed by her experience growing up poor in a racially diverse neighborhood in miami, as well as her queer feminist perspective on race, class, gender, and sexuality. she will brave new england winter walks if the right company is involved.

Groups audience: 

My Body, My Choices: The Trans/GNC Health Education You Didn't Get in School!
Trans & gender non-conforming people often have questions about how to care for our bodies and not a lot of places to get answers. How can I reduce chances of infection when I don’t have safe access to a bathroom? Where can I find a binder that’s right for my chest? How do I tuck? How can I make prosthetics when I can’t afford them? What are the risks and benefits to silicone injections? What hormone and surgery options exist, and what will they do to my body? This workshop provides an overview of the health needs specific to trans/GNC people and a non-judgmental place to ask the questions you’ve been wanting to! This is a closed session for trans, gender non-conforming, and gender-questioning people.
Speakers (click to view): Cecilia M. Gentili (She/Her), Lyndon Cudlitz (He/Him)

My Body, My Choices: The Trans/GNC Health Education You Didn't Get in School!

Speakers

Cecilia M. Gentili (She/Her)

Originally from Argentina, Cecilia Gentili started working as an intern at the LGBT Center where she found her passion for advocacy and services and after that she ran the Transgender Health Program at Apicha CHC from 2012 to 2016. She currently serves as the Director of Policy and Public Affairs at GMHC. She was a contributor to Trans Bodies Trans Selves and is a collaborator with Translatina Network.

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Lyndon Cudlitz (He/Him)

Lyndon Cudlitz trains healthcare providers, community organizations, and others in providing relevant services for queer & trans individuals. As a result of this work, Planned Parenthood affiliates in Upstate NY are now successfully providing hormone access, as well as other trans-affirming reproductive healthcare. Lyndon’s 16 years in social justice advocacy and LGBTQ health education is strongly informed by his transfeminist and working-class perspectives.

Groups audience: 

Parenting with Dignity: The Policing of Mothers of Color
The criminal justice system, welfare reform, and the health care profession interact in order to regulate and isolate poor mothers of color. We must expand our movement’s discussion of parenting to center the experiences of women of color. Join our collaborative group to identify points of access for reproductive justice that will effectively stop the policing of mothers of color and eliminate the harmful effects on our communities.
Speakers (click to view): Stephanie Croney (She/Her), Emily R. Champlin (She/Her), Sequoia Ayala (She/Her)

Parenting with Dignity: The Policing of Mothers of Color

Speakers

Stephanie Croney (She/Her)

Stephanie Croney is an If/When/How Policy Fellow at the Black Women's Health Imperative. She recently graduated from Howard University's School of Law. She is passionate about child advocacy, intimate partner violence, and family court/foster care/child welfare reform.

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Emily R. Champlin (She/Her)

Emily R. Champlin is a lifelong feminist and social justice advocate. After receiving her BA in Feminist Studies, she worked as a domestic violence advocate focusing on LGBTQ survivors. Throughout law school, she was avidly involved in studying and promoting reproductive justice. As a Fellow, her work focuses on the intersecting barriers of racism, limited English proficiency, immigration status, and cultural competency in accessing comprehensive health care.

Groups audience: 

Sequoia Ayala (She/Her)

Sequoia Ayala received her law degree and master’s degree in International Relations from the American University Washington College of Law and School of International Service, respectively. As the Law and Policy Fellow at SisterLove, Sequoia works collaboratively with community members, elected officials, and policymakers in advancement of the health, well-being, and human rights of Black women living with HIV/AIDS, those at risk for contracting HIV/AIDS, and for all individuals who belong to marginalized communities that are severely and disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS, especially in the Deep South and Global South. Additionally, she is a Georgia licensed attorney who provides low-cost legal assistance in family law and immigration. A proud University of Georgia alumna and native Georgian, Sequoia resides in Atlanta with her husband and two sons.

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Religion, Spirituality, and Our Struggles for Justice
For many of us, our activist work is guided by our religious or spiritual beliefs. For some, there is a disconnect that deserves to be healed. How do we bring our whole selves into our activist work? How do we mobilize our faith communities to join the fight for justice? Join panelists from from diverse religious traditions as we discuss connecting our religious and spiritual lives with our work for reproductive justice, abortion rights, and LGBTQ justice. Participants will gain an understanding of why collaborative partnerships with faith communities can be important in this work, how religious leaders are currently engaging with the movement, and learn about examples of successful religious/secular partnerships from progressive movements.
Speakers (click to view): Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz (She/Her), Dori Midnight (She/Her), Sadia Arshad (She/Her), Toni M. Bond Leonard (She/Her)

Religion, Spirituality, and Our Struggles for Justice

Speakers

Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz (She/Her)

Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz is the Executive for Program and Strategic Partnerships at the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. She began organizing around racial and gender justice at Wheaton College in Massachusetts in the early 90’s. After college she began a 25 year journey as a movement builder, cultural worker and writer working across issues of LGBT liberation, racial, disability and gender justice. She was on the first LGBTQ delegation to Palestine in 2012 and has been a frequent blogger and writer for many feminist and racial justice publications. In 2002, she was a contributing author to the groundbreaking anthology Colonize This! Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism.

Groups audience: 

Dori Midnight (She/Her)

Dori Midnight practices community-based intuitive healing that weaves together plant and stone medicine, ancestral and queer magic, and anti-oppression work. Drawing on traditions from her mixed ancestry (Sephardi/Ashkenazi/Roma) and her training as a clinical herbalist and interfaith minister, Dori's work is grounded in self-determinism and collective liberation and is inspired/supported by the works/magics of disability and healing justice and Jewish earth-based practices.

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Sadia Arshad (She/Her)

Sadia Arshad is a reproductive justice nerd working in health communications during the day and doing youth empowerment and community engagement work at night. She fell into this work by accident and couldn't be happier.

Groups audience: 

Toni M. Bond Leonard (She/Her)

Toni Bond Leonard is a reproductive justice activist and womanist ethicist who works at the intersection of religion and reproductive justice. She is one of the twelve founding mothers who coined the term "reproductive justice" in 1994. She has worked in the reproductive health, rights, and justice movements for the past 25 years and has led an abortion fund, co-founded one of the first black women's reproductive justice groups, Black Women for Reproductive Justice, and has chaired the boards of the National Network of Abortion Funds and SisterSong. She is currently a member of the Advisory Committee for CLPP.

Groups audience: 

Say Something: Preventing Interpersonal Violence in Your Communities
Whoever you are, whatever your profession is, and whomever you come into contact with – everyone can Say Something to help prevent interpersonal violence. To support people of all genders in their ongoing efforts to create a safer community, Safe Passage offers The Prevention LAB: a social experiment in creating safe community. In this interactive workshop, participants will work together to build skills of assertive communication and boundary-setting across various relationships using scenarios that are generated from real life experiences.
Speakers (click to view): Laura Penney (She/Her)

Say Something: Preventing Interpersonal Violence in Your Communities

Speakers

Laura Penney (She/Her)

Laura Penney has been working in the field of domestic and sexual violence for over eight years. She received her BA from UMass Amherst in Social Thought and Political Economy, and is currently an MSW candidate at Westfield State University. Laura is presently the Director of Community Engagement at Safe Passage, and serves as the Project Director for the prevention initiative Say Something.

Groups audience: 

Staying Connected to the Movement while Parenting
As parents, people planning to parent, and people deciding whether to parent, we will name and address our collective needs. Facilitators and participants, experts of their own lives, will share ideas and resources that uplift parenting and support people in both naming our parenting needs in movement spaces and centering justice within our ideas of family. Bring your questions and needs around conception and birth (sperm donation, fertility, birth experiences), paths to parenting that include fostering and adoption, building social justice in our families and communities, working outside the home while parenting, bringing activist work into our children's schools and upbringing, and the ongoing struggle for institutional support of parenting (paid sick leave, parental leave, pay equity). Through small group break-outs, group discussion and networking, we will envision movement space that supports families' needs and parents' ability to participate fully.
Speakers (click to view): Jaspreet Chowdhary (She/Her), Katie McKay Bryson (She/Her)

Staying Connected to the Movement while Parenting

Speakers

Jaspreet Chowdhary (She/Her)

Jaspreet Chowdhary received a B.A. in English and Women’s Studies from Goucher College, a M.P.H. in Epidemiology from Tulane University, and a J.D. from Seattle University School of Law. She is currently the Senior Policy Specialist at the 30 for 30 campaign. She was part of the inaugural class of the If/When/How Fellowship program and was placed at the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum.

Groups audience: 

Katie McKay Bryson (She/Her)

Katie McKay Bryson is a single mom & foster parent living on traditional Dena'ina territory in Alaska. Active in environmental, reproductive, and social justice movement work since her early teens, she's currently a grant writer for an Alaska Native tribal coalition, and works to build embrace of Indian Child Welfare Act rights among non-Native activists and foster/adoptive parents.

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You Can't Take This Away From Me! - Abortion Pills in the Hands of Those Who Need Them
Around the world and in the U.S., abortion pills offer a safe method of abortion in the first trimester, whether provided by a medical practitioner or whether self-managed by the pregnant person. This workshop will give every participant information about how abortion pills work, what precautions are needed before using them, and what a person can expect as the pills cause an abortion. Participants will hear from an advocate and a doctor who are empowering people around the world and in U.S. with access to abortion pills. By gaining an understanding of the actual medical experience and advocacy context, participants will be better equipped as abortion activists who can demystify the abortion pill and as abortion advocates who can create access in their own communities.
Speakers (click to view): Susan Yanow M.S.W. (She/Her)

You Can't Take This Away From Me! - Abortion Pills in the Hands of Those Who Need Them

Speakers

Susan Yanow M.S.W. (She/Her)

A long-time reproductive rights activist, Susan Yanow works to expand access to abortion domestically and internationally. She is a co-founder of Women Help Women, an international organization that provides abortion and contraception services and supports women who are self-managing their abortions, and also works with a number of domestic projects that focus on expanding access to abortion.

Groups audience: 

Sunday 9:00AM - 10:30AM

Constructing [and deconstructing] the "Good Mom"
What is it like to be a mom on welfare? How do unstably housed mothers navigate challenges? What makes a person unfit to parent? And who gets to decide? The (lack of the) right to have and raise children is a major reproductive INjustice experienced by parents on the margins. For drug users, people involved in the sex trade, and/or low income and homeless parents, parental rights are frequently denied when systems judge ‘parental fit-ness’ based on stereotypes about these groups or establish standards that are beyond their reach. Led by community organizers and mothers, this workshop will use discussion and small-group activities to help attendees explore their own beliefs about “fit” or ‘unfit” parents, deconstruct biases we hold, learn more about the challenges many parents face, and how we can work together to create space for parents to live with their children.
Speakers (click to view): Katherine M. Koster (She/Her), Alex Andrews (She/Her)

Constructing [and deconstructing] the "Good Mom"

Speakers

Katherine M. Koster (She/Her)

Katherine M. Koster has been involved in community organizing, education, and advocacy for women for over 6 years. In addition to working for SWOP-USA, she serves on the board of SWOP Behind Bars where she manages responding to letters from and meeting the needs of incarcerated women with sex trade experience.

Groups audience: 

Alex Andrews (She/Her)

As a formerly incarcerated sex worker and the co founder for SWOP Behind Bars, Alex Andrews knew it was critical to start reaching men and women who were experiencing the harm of the criminalization of sex work. As the North American Representative for NSWP, Alex hopes to amplify the voices of incarcerated sex workers around the world.

Groups audience: 

Creating a Community of Care as an act of Self-Preservation
Audre Lorde said, "Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare." But self-care is not easy and can be especially difficult for Southerners and people working in red states. Let's unpack the importance of self-care for self-preservation and for the movement. What does self-care look like for you? How do you hold yourself accountable to practicing it? We must amplify the voices of individuals in the communities we serve while making our movements more accessible, but how do we create a culture of community care that supports activists AND our larger communities? Let's build connections in the movement across geographical space and action plan to keep our connections strong. Let's talk about how we can hold each other accountable to practicing self-care as an act of rebellion. This session is intended for Southerners and people in red states.
Speakers (click to view): Marlo Barrera (She/Her), Oriaku Njoku (She/Her or They/Them)

Creating a Community of Care as an act of Self-Preservation

Speakers

Marlo Barrera (She/Her)

Marlo Barrera is a New Orleans native who began organizing what became the Reproductive Justice Action Collective in 2016. Please check out the Collective’s website! RejacNOLA.org

Groups audience: 

Oriaku Njoku (She/Her or They/Them)

Oriaku Njoku, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast, works at the intersection of abortion access and reproductive justice. She supports Southerners in navigating pathways to accessing safe, affordable, and compassionate abortion care through funding, practical support, and advocacy. She truly believes that we can and will create a cultural shift around how we talk about abortion in the South.

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Curls and Condoms: What's Your Sexual Health Regimen?
What if conversations about our curls happened in tandem with our conversations about condoms? History shows us that women of color (WOC) are often met with shame, stigma and violence because our aesthetic does not appeal or conform to white hegemonic standards of beauty. Historically and currently, these white standards show up in our conversations, bodies, reproductive choices, and sexual health. Let’s liberate ourselves. The natural hair community encourages women to unapologetically reclaim who they are by embracing their natural curls, kinks and coils. Through multiple outlets such as meet-ups and social media, women have honest, open, informational and supportive dialogue about their hair care regimens. Let’s use this same approach to foster an environment where we can feel just as empowered, liberated, and supported to talk about our sexual and reproductive experiences from birth control and condoms, to abortion and relationships. This session will center the experiences of Black women and femmes.
Speakers (click to view): Brittany Brathwaite (She/Her), Ramelcy Uribe (She/Her)

Curls and Condoms: What's Your Sexual Health Regimen?

Speakers

Brittany Brathwaite (She/Her)

Brittany Brathwaite is a reproductive justice activist, youth worker and community accountable scholar with a deep-seated commitment to supporting the leadership, organizing, and healing of girls of color. Brittany holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Women’s and Gender Studies and Sociology from Syracuse University and a Master of Public Health and a Master of Social Work from Columbia University. When she’s not attempting to save the world, you can catch her in Brooklyn curating The Homegirl Box and making outfits for her social justice fashion blog, Movement Fly.

Groups audience: 

Ramelcy Uribe (She/Her)

Ramelcy Uribe is an AfroLatina, regular degular girl from the South Bronx. She sees herself as a budding youth worker & intellectual, as well as a womanist and feminist in process. She is invested in making social justice work and education accessible to folks on the margins. As a believer in the ever-present magic of Womxn of Color, she hopes to continue to imagine, create, and take action to preserve, honor, celebrate, and expand the brilliance her community(s) has to offer.

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Educators Unite for Reproductive Justice
What does it mean to be a reproductive justice educator when you rarely have the opportunity to talk about abortion? How can do teachers of color find support networks in a still, largely white field? How can we ethically educate across cultures and use white privilege to raise up communities of color? Can I come out as a queer educator? As a social justice advocate? Am I interrupting or aiding the school-to-prison pipeline? Am I teacher? Do I want to be a teacher? Bring your questions, strategies, successes, and attempts so that we--aspiring and current early childhood, K-12, and beyond educators--can continue to infuse our education communities with social justice.
Speakers (click to view): Lani Blechman (She/Her)

Educators Unite for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Lani Blechman (She/Her)

Lani Blechman is a Western Massachusetts elementary school librarian and social justice organizer, commonly focusing on white privilege and gender inclusion. She loves it when her worlds collide. Lani is a former CLPP conference coordinator who excitedly re-joined the CLPP Conference Planning Team last May.

Groups audience: 

How We Win: Using Direct Action to Increase Access to Abortion and Advance Reproductive Justice
If we want to stop losing and start winning, we need to make it clear that we are unwilling to lose. In this interactive workshop, facilitators will lead a direct action training tailored to reproductive justice activists and advocates working at the grassroots level. Using examples and clear definitions, we will cover what direct action is, why direct action is a necessary part of the movement, and how it is effective in bringing about change. We will spotlight the work of intersectional social change activists, and prepare participants to lead direct actions in your own communities.
Speakers (click to view): Erin Matson (She/Her), Pamela Merritt (She/Her)

How We Win: Using Direct Action to Increase Access to Abortion and Advance Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Erin Matson (She/Her)

Erin Matson is co-founder and co-director of Reproaction, a direct action group formed to increase access to abortion and advance reproductive justice. She lives in Arlington, Va. She is a proud mom.

Groups audience: 

Pamela Merritt (She/Her)

Pamela Merritt is co-founder and co-director of Reproaction, a new direct action group forming to increase access to abortion and advance reproductive justice. Merritt blogs at AngryBlackBitch.com, and is a founding member of the Trust Black Women Partnership. She has been a featured contributor on National Public Radio (NPR), and her writing has been published in the Chicago Sun-Times, Rewire, Rolling Stone, and The Guardian.

Groups audience: 

Living Up to Our Values to Build a Healthier, More Sustainable Movement
The reproductive health, rights and justice movements envision a world where each person manages their health, life and families with dignity and without obstacles. This is our vision, but when we look at how we run our organizations or how we treat each other, we often see that we are not living up to our values. This unactualized vision for health and dignity combines with racism and other systems of oppression in our movements--making it difficult to sustain the health of advocates or organizations. During this session, facilitators will lead a conversation that centers individual experiences, examines the specific needs and experiences of women of color and women of color led organizations, and develops ideas about how to create real change. We must ensure self-care, support and respect for individuals in order to cultivate a healthier, more sustainable movement.
Speakers (click to view): Monica Simpson (She/Her), Lill M. Hewko (They/Them or She/Her), Caitlin Hays Gaffin (She/Her)

Living Up to Our Values to Build a Healthier, More Sustainable Movement

Speakers

Monica Simpson (She/Her)

Monica Raye Simpson is the Executive Director of SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective. A native of rural North Carolina, Monica is deeply invested in southern movement building and the fight for Black liberation. She is also committed to birth justice as a certified Doula. Monica couples her activism with her artistry and created SisterSong's first program focused on creating innovative culture shift strategies. Because of her “artivism” Monica was named as a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine and chosen as one of Advocate Magazine’s 40 under 40 leaders.

Groups audience: 

Lill M. Hewko (They/Them or She/Her)

Lill Hewko, an attorney and activist, uses the reproductive justice framework to bring incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals together to advocate for systemic change. A graduate of the University of Washington School of Law. Lill identifies as a queer, mixed-Latinx from a working-class background.

Groups audience: 

Miscarriage of Justice: Purvi Patel & The Criminalization of AAPI Women
In July 2013, Purvi Patel went to an Indiana hospital for post-pregnancy care. Ms. Patel’s next stop was an Indiana jail. This caucus will examine how the murder and neglect charges against Ms. Patel were fueled by a toxic interplay of anti-choice rhetoric, stereotypes about AAPI communities, and misuse of laws meant to protect pregnant people. As the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum supported Ms. Patel and documented the unfair circumstances of her case, NAPAWF found that Ms. Patel’s case and Indiana’s laws provided a unique look into anti-AAPI hostility--with Indiana prosecutors using the law to punish only pregnant AAPI women. We will use this discussion to build our capacity as abortion advocates and anti-racism advocates within and for the AAPI community.
Speakers (click to view): Mohini Lal (She/Her)

Miscarriage of Justice: Purvi Patel & The Criminalization of AAPI Women

Speakers

Mohini Lal (She/Her)

Mohini Lal is the If/When/How Reproductive Justice Fellow at the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum (NAPAWF). She is a first-generation immigrant from Texas. Mohini graduated from Chicago-Kent College of Law with a J.D. and certificates in Public Interest and Praxis Law. Mohini is committed to creating and implementing policies that provide culturally competent legal and social services.

Groups audience: 

Queering Reproductive Justice: Strength in our Differences
Our issues and people are not separate, we are interconnected. The need to acknowledge and organize around our full selves is reinforced every day of the Trump Administration. #NoBanNoWall is about us as queer people, and we know that subsequent attacks on our queer, trans youth in schools is connected. In this time of upheaval and turmoil, what is our vision for intersectional base-building across the reproductive justice movement? How do we affirm a truly queer analysis and approach to liberation that is radically inclusive? Come to hear from activists working at the intersections of community support and HIV, black communities and reproductive health, indigenous sovereignty and local government, gender and intersexuality, and LGBTQ liberation.
Speakers (click to view): Shayla Robinson (She/Her), Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz (She/Her), Bré Anna Campbell (She/Her), Cierra Burks, Cole Parke (They/Them), Coya White Hat-Artichoker (She/Her), Emily Quinn

Queering Reproductive Justice: Strength in our Differences

Speakers

Shayla Robinson (She/Her)

Shayla Robinson is a Southern femme same-gender loving woman in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexualities Studies Master’s Program at Georgia State University, where she also serves as a graduate research assistant. She is interested in pursuing scholarship related to modern dance, art, and Black lesbian identities. As the Program Specialist/Organizer, she handles the programming and event development at SPARK, as well as building and maintaining coalitions with other organizations fighting injustice and oppression for all marginalized people.

Groups audience: 

Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz (She/Her)

Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz is the Executive for Program and Strategic Partnerships at the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. She began organizing around racial and gender justice at Wheaton College in Massachusetts in the early 90’s. After college she began a 25 year journey as a movement builder, cultural worker and writer working across issues of LGBT liberation, racial, disability and gender justice. She was on the first LGBTQ delegation to Palestine in 2012 and has been a frequent blogger and writer for many feminist and racial justice publications. In 2002, she was a contributing author to the groundbreaking anthology Colonize This! Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism.

Groups audience: 

Bré Anna Campbell (She/Her)

Bré Anne Campbell is the Executive Director and Co-Founder of the Trans Sistas of Color Project – Detroit. She is a board member of Positive Women's Network USA, a 2015 Victory Fund Empowerment Fellow, a National Advisory Board member of Positively Trans and a member of the 2016 Brown Boi LGBT Executive Director Training Program. She is featured in the Greater Than AIDS "EMPOWERED: Trans Women & HIV" campaign. She also serves as an Executive Producer of a forthcoming documentary exploring the narratives of TWOC in Detroit.

Groups audience: 

Cole Parke (They/Them)

Cole Parke is the LGBTQ & Gender Justice Researcher at Political Research Associates, a social justice think tank based in Boston. PRA is dedicated to supporting organizers and activists on the Left with info and analysis about right-wing opposition to our collective struggle(s) for liberation.

Groups audience: 

Radical Reproductive Justice -- Keeping it Real, Relevant and Revolutionary!
Reproductive Justice is and will continue to be resisted by the right, and co-opted by the left. Critics on the right and left often refuse to use the human rights framework in talking about Reproductive Justice, and some mainstream groups attempt to avoid discussions of white supremacy in the Pro-Choice movement. Even some women of color attempt similar things, and focus on the concepts of intersectionality, rather than the human rights basis of Reproductive Justice. Some argue that Reproductive Justice is not appropriate or applicable to white women, people of trans or nonbinary experience, or men. Bring your questions for this roundtable to use to discuss how to keep Reproductive Justice radical and revolutionary and able to fulfill its transformative possibilities.
Speakers (click to view): Loretta J. Ross (She/Her), Erika Derkas (She/Her or They/Them), Lynn Roberts (She/Her or They/Them), Whitney Peoples (She/Her)

Radical Reproductive Justice -- Keeping it Real, Relevant and Revolutionary!

Speakers

Loretta J. Ross (She/Her)

Loretta J. Ross was the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012. She helped create the theory of "Reproductive Justice" in 1994 and led a rape crisis center in the 1970s. She co-authored Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice in 2004, and Reproductive Justice: An Introduction in 2017.

Groups audience: 

Erika Derkas (She/Her or They/Them)

Erika Derkas has a long history of activism/academics focusing on race and gender justice, particularly examining national and international population control targeting poor women, indigenous women and women of color. Her current scholarship investigates reproductive justice in Occupied Palestine. She is a longtime ally member of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective and a member of the Southwest Institute for Research on Women.

Groups audience: 

Lynn Roberts (She/Her or They/Them)

Lynn Roberts’ current activism and scholarship examines the intersection of race, class and gender in adolescent dating relationships, juvenile justice and reproductive health policies; as well as the impact of models of collaborative inquiry and teaching on civic and political engagement. She is honored to be the mother of four amazing human beings (ages 19-37) and is in constant awe of her four grandchildren.

Groups audience: 

Whitney Peoples (She/Her)

With fifteen years experience in feminist and critical race research, activism, and teaching, Dr. Whitney Peoples has spoken and written on the intersections of race, gender, and popular culture. She has published critical essays on topics including hip-hop feminism, advertising for oral contraceptives, and representations of women in African American film.

Groups audience: 

Reproductive Justice for Young Mothers: Power in Complex Identities
In the U.S., young people raising children are often stigmatized, shamed, and disenfranchised for our role as parents. Yet many of us did not have access to accurate and inclusive sexual education, the power of choice, or a sense of agency and autonomy over our own bodies. This workshop is an opportunity for you to join us to unpack and discuss what we, as a movement, can unlearn and reframe about young parenthood. We can eradicate the sexist and racist framework of teenage pregnancy prevention and, instead, amplify reproductive justice for young people and our families.
Speakers (click to view): Gloria Malone (She/Her), Natasha Vianna, Christina Martinez (She/Her), Marylouise Kuti

Reproductive Justice for Young Mothers: Power in Complex Identities

Speakers

Gloria Malone (She/Her)

Gloria Malone is a reproductive justice advocate and co founder of #NoTeenShame. She can be found online at GloriaMalone.com and on social media as @GloriaMalone.

Groups audience: 

Natasha Vianna

Natasha Vianna is a Latina who works to deconstruct and redefine young motherhood and is cofounder of #NoTeenShame. In collaboration with organizers across the country, she has developed strategic messaging campaigns that dissect the realities of teen pregnancy within reproductive justice. She recently took the stage to share a TEDx talk on the importance of a culture that supports teen parents and their children.

Groups audience: 

- Private group -

Christina Martinez (She/Her)

Christina Martinez is an early childhood educator with the Sacramento City Unified School District & a co-founder of #noteenshame. Through her work she advocates for families & youth in the culturally & linguistically diverse communities of California’s capital.

Groups audience: 

Marylouise Kuti

Marylouise Kuti works within New Mexico and the nation to provide safe platforms to increase access to education, resources and accurate information for expectant and parenting youth, their children, and organizational allies to ensure pregnancy prevention for young parents is not disrespectful and unjust to young families.

Groups audience: 

So your friend is having an abortion--how can you help? A doula perspective.
Abortion doula or full spectrum doula collectives are forming across the U.S. If you have not had the opportunity to be trained, this is your starting point. We will discuss the role of doulas, the types of support abortion doulas can offer, and the skills you need to provide non-medical support to people having abortions. We will be centering the experience(s) of queer, trans, and gender non-conforming folks seeking abortion care, and sharing/discussing specific ways to support these friends and community members. This workshop won't be enough to prepare you to work shifts in a hospital or clinic, but it will help you be better prepared to support the people in your life who are having abortions and to imagine an abortion doula service in your community.
Speakers (click to view): Janhavi Madabushi (They/Them), Amy Arrington (She/Her), Mary Durden, Wilberthe Pilate (She/Her)

So your friend is having an abortion--how can you help? A doula perspective.

Speakers

Janhavi Madabushi (They/Them)

Janhavi Madabushi is a South Indian immigrant, queer and nonbinary person. They are a full-spectrum doula, a racial justice organizer and a yoga teacher trainee who works in the Boston metro area.

Groups audience: 

Amy Arrington (She/Her)

I am a medical assistant, doula, lactation counselor, aspiring midwife sailor, songwriter and movie nerd. I am Boston born and raised with time spent in Seattle and New Yok. I want to do work that supports people of color in their reproductive experiences and that makes the world more sex positive.

Groups audience: 

Mary Durden

Mary Durden is a queer, black woman fighting to uplift survivors of oppression. She volunteers for the Boston Doula Project, an abortion doula collective that provides nonjudgmental support for people experiencing abortion. She is also the Communications and Outreach Manager at Ibis Reproductive Health where she works on the Free the Pill campaign to make a birth control pill available over the counter in the US.

Groups audience: 

Wilberthe Pilate (She/Her)

Wilberthe Pilate is registered nurse who cares for newly postpartum mothers and parents and people experiencing high-risk pregnancy conditions. She is also an abortion doula with the Boston Doula Project. She loves thinking and talking about healing, magic, birth, and death. She’s a Pisces sun/Capricorn moon/Sagittarius rising. She got her Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing from Umass Amherst in 2014.

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UN-Buckling the Bible Belt: Best Practices for RJ & Faith Organizing among Southern Christian Churches
Developed over 10 years organizing with Black Church leaders, SisterReach has a unique relational strategy organizing people of faith. Learn how we organize and equip clergy to support bodily autonomy and self-determination by moving away from the simple request to “collar up and show up” and towards a paradigm of symbiosis. We must overcome barriers that have historically made partnerships with some churches difficult if not impossible. This workshop will help clarify the need for organizing Christian Churches in the South, help you as an advocate and organizer assess your preparedness for organizing in communities of faith, and offer an introduction to our research and process.
Speakers (click to view): Rev. Faye London (She/Her)

UN-Buckling the Bible Belt: Best Practices for RJ & Faith Organizing among Southern Christian Churches

Speakers

Rev. Faye London (She/Her)

Rev. Faye London acknowledged a call to ministry with women to dismantle silence and stigma around about sexual abuse. She has done this work with churches in Tennessee before and since earning her Master of Divinity degree from Vanderbilt Divinity School. In her capacity at SisterReach, Faye seeks to continue to broaden the conversation around women's bodies as participating fully in the Image of God.

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