2016 Conference Workshops

This workshop list is pending; more sessions are being added daily.

%1Workshops

Friday 4:00PM - 6:00PM

A Pocketbook Issue: Abortion Access is Economic Justice

Join our panel of activists working at state and national levels as they discuss their exciting work at the intersections of reproductive justice and economic justice. Presenters from the All* Above All campaign and National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health will discuss current campaign work for the #FightFor15, dignity for young parents, and efforts to repeal the Hyde amendment with the groundbreaking EACH Woman Act.

Speakers (click to view): Angy Rivera, Bethany Van Kampen, Morgan Hopkins

A Pocketbook Issue: Abortion Access is Economic Justice

Speakers

Angy Rivera

Angy Rivera is a Colombian immigrant and the proud daughter of a single teen mom. She serves as the New York Field Coordinator at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health.

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Bethany Van Kampen

Bethany Van Kampen serves as the Policy Analyst at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health where she is responsible for the abortion access and affordability portfolio. Prior to joining NLIRH, Bethany worked as a legislative fellow in the office of Senator Barbara Boxer (CA). She received her law degree and Master of Social Work from Tulane University where she co-founded and served as president of the Tulane Law Students for Reproductive Justice and was a member of the Tulane Domestic Violence Law Clinic. Prior to graduate school, Bethany served in the Peace Corps in Costa Rica.

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Morgan Hopkins

Morgan Hopkins creates synthesis between the state, federal, and field work of the All* Above All public education campaign. Previously, she worked at the National Network of Abortion Funds. Morgan has a B.A. with Honors in Psychology from Hobart and William Smith Colleges and a Masters in Psychology with a certificate in Women's Studies from the University of Houston-Clear Lake.

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Appropriate Whiteness
During this workshop, participants will learn how to have difficult conversations about white privilege and white supremacy with the people they love, including families, club members, and co-workers. We'll discuss how to be a "credit to your race" in becoming an abolitionist against racism in the reproductive rights movement, how to actively listen and ask questions of people of color with respect, and how to avoid denial, racial triggers and marginalization.
Speakers (click to view): Loretta J. Ross

Appropriate Whiteness

Speakers

Loretta J. Ross

Loretta J. Ross is a former National Coordinator of SisterSong, where she worked from 2005-2012. She helped create the theory of "Reproductive Justice" in 1994 and co-authored Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice in 2004.

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Campus Accountability, Consent and Ending Rape Culture

Building campus communities that can effectively intervene, prevent and eventually end the epidemic of sexual violence means taking a multi-pronged approach that pushes the administration to hold perpetrators accountable while shifting and ensuring conversations about consent and rape, and making space for healing to help survivors move forward. From updating student code definitions to cultivating story telling sessions, we can make a difference. Hear from advocates about examples of education, prevention and support programs that are working to create safer space and change the culture on college campuses.

Speakers (click to view): Mahroh Jahangiri, Morgan Meneses-Sheets, Rebecca Gorena, Zoe Ridolfi-Starr

Campus Accountability, Consent and Ending Rape Culture

Speakers

Mahroh Jahangiri

Mahroh Jahangiri is a Deputy Director of Know Your IX, a national survivor-run, student-driven campaign to end sexual violence in schools. Before joining KYIX, Mahroh was a junior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Her research on immigration detention in Washington, DC and work in Cairo, Egypt has focused on the ways in which American militarization, racism, and sexual violence impact non-white communities transnationally.

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Morgan Meneses-Sheets

Morgan Meneses-Sheets has more than 15 years of experience leading programs for a range of reproductive and social justice organizations. Currently, she is a consultant working with nonprofit advocacy groups to create effective communications and public affairs strategies to raise awareness and cultivate support for social, culture and policy change.

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Rebecca Gorena

Rebecca Gorena is an unapologetic queer & feminist activist and Texas State Organizer with URGE: Unite for Reproductive & Gender Equity, where she does civic engagement, training and mobilizing young Texans for reproductive justice. A 2012 University of Texas at Austin alum, she served as an Americorps VISTA with the Girls Empowerment Network before moving to Philadelphia to join the development team at WOMEN’S WAY.

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Zoe Ridolfi-Starr

Zoe Ridolfi-Starr is an activist, writer, and educator focused on sexual violence, health, pleasure, and power. Zoe is the Deputy Director at Know Your IX, a survivor- and youth-driven organization working to end gender violence in schools. She graduated from Columbia University in 2015, where she was a complainant in the Title IX complaint against her school and involved in organizing against violence on campus.

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Contraceptive Safety and LARC

Long-acting reversible contraceptives (like IUDs and hormonal implants) and hormonal injections (like Depo-Provera) are disproportionately marketed and prescribed to young women, women of color, and women in the global South. Panelists will provide a brief overview of health disparities affecting women of color and queer and trans youth; contraceptive equity as it relates to sexual and reproductive health; forms of eugenics and population control; sterilization of people who are institutionalized; and barriers to access to a full range of contraceptives.

Speakers (click to view): Anne Hendrixson, Dr. Krystal Redman, Monica Raye Simpson

Contraceptive Safety and LARC

Speakers

Anne Hendrixson

Anne Hendrixson is the Director of the Population and Development Program (PopDev) at Hampshire College.

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Dr. Krystal Redman

Dr. Krystal Redman brings over 10 years of experience in managing low-income and women focused public health access and community-based youth development programs. Previously, Dr. Redman served as the Senior Project Director, Maternal and Child Health, at the Georgia Department of Public Health, where she worked on creating greater healthcare access for women throughout the state of Georgia. Dr. Redman received her Bachelors of Science in Sociology from University of California, Riverside and a Masters of Health Administration from University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and her Doctorates of Public Health from Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California.

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Monica Raye Simpson

Monica Raye Simpson is the Executive Director of SisterSong, and has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, and the systematic physical and emotional violence inflicted upon Black people with an emphasis on Black Southerners and LGBTQ people. She is also a singer, full circle Doula and was named a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine & a 40 under 40 leader by the Advocate.

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How We Win: Using Direct Action to Increase Access to Abortion and Advance Reproductive Justice

If we want to stop losing and start winning, we need to make it clear we're unwilling to lose. In this interactive workshop we will lead a direct action training tailored to reproductive justice activists and advocates working at the grassroots level. Using examples and clear definitions, we'll cover what direct action is, why direct action is a necessary part of the movement, and how it's effective in bringing about change. We'll spotlight the work of intersectional social change activists, and lead a training for those interested in leading direct actions in their own communities.

Speakers (click to view): Erin Matson, Pamela Merritt

How We Win: Using Direct Action to Increase Access to Abortion and Advance Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Erin Matson

Erin Matson is co-founder and co-director of Reproaction, a new group forming to increase access to abortion and advance reproductive justice. An organizer and writer, Erin lives in Virginia and has a young daughter.

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Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

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Imagination as the Antidote to the Impossible: Imaginative Practices for Reproductive Justice

Many of us working on reproductive justice are faced with “impossible” tasks everyday. Moving forward means thinking outside the box and opening our minds to new ideas and practices to get us through tough problems and towards creative solutions. How can “play” be productive? How can imagination open us to new ways of working and living? Join us at our interactive imagination stations to explore these and other questions.

Speakers (click to view): Indra Lusero, Nikki Zaleski, Sandra Criswell, Yong Chan Miller

Imagination as the Antidote to the Impossible: Imaginative Practices for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Indra Lusero

Indra Lusero is a reproductive justice attorney and entrepreneur and proud to have been named “All Around Reproductive Justice Champion” by the Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights. Indra is the founder and director of Elephant Circle and the Birth Rights Bar Association.

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Nikki Zaleski

Nikki Zaleski is the Education and Arts Justice Director at the Illinois Caucus for Adolescent Health, where she manages a participatory performance cadre called For Youth Inquiry (FYI) as well as other ICAH educational programs.

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Sandra Criswell

Sandra Criswell is a mixed race Pinay high holy femme from Oklahoma City, OK. As the CoreAlign Field Building Manager, she works with brilliant organizers to co-create generative spaces and innovative solutions in the Central and South. Sandra plays with graphic recording, space creation, and cooking her thoughts and feelings and serving them up to her friends and family to unlock imagination’s potential to solve the impossible.

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Yong Chan Miller

Yong Chan Miller lives in Oakland, CA, and is the executive director of Surge. She has worked in social justice movements for over 20 years primarily at the intersections of race, class, and gender.

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Is There Such a Thing as Bad Abortions? When Storytelling Gets Real

Storytelling has and is being used as a tool for social impact and culture shift, specifically regarding the power of story sharing when it comes to personal perceptions of abortion. But what are some of the difficulties in using storytelling as a movement building tool? In bringing to light a wide experience of abortion stories, are there tough questions to address regarding morality, objectivity, and the multiple stigmas at play? Let’s have a real and honest conversation about what people perceive as “good abortions” and “bad abortions,” and use our collective knowledge and experiences to more effectively use storytelling as a game-changing tool.

Speakers (click to view): Julia Reticker-Flynn, Shomya Tripathy

Is There Such a Thing as Bad Abortions? When Storytelling Gets Real

Speakers

Julia Reticker-Flynn

Julia Reticker-Flynn is the Director of Youth Organizing and Mobilization at Advocates for Youth, where she works with young people across the country to advocate for cultural and policy change that supports young people’s sexual health and rights. In 2011, she launched the 1 in 3 campaign to destigmatize abortion and promote access to abortion services. She currently serves on the Board of Directors of Nursing Students for Choice.

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Shomya Tripathy

Shomya Tripathy is the Youth Activist Network Manager at Advocates for Youth and works with young people around the country to fight abortion stigma on their campuses.

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Money for Our Movements
How will your reproductive justice work get the funding it needs? This session is geared towards anyone who has a project or organization they want to raise funds for, as well as people who want to learn more about the field of philanthropy and the value of being an activist donor. We will provide an overview of the foundation landscape for reproductive justice work and will provide practical advice for approaching foundation staff as well as the ins and outs of the grant proposal process. In addition to fundraising from foundations, we will dive into fundraising from individuals, a prospect where there is far more light at the end of the tunnel! We’ll discuss major donor fundraising as well as grassroots fundraising campaigns.
Speakers (click to view): Alicia Jay, Joy Messinger, Rye Young

Money for Our Movements

Speakers

Alicia Jay

Alicia Jay is a Co-Founder and the Managing Director of Make It Work, a campaign to bring about change on the economic security issues that impact women and working families. She is also the Principal of Rabble Up Coaching for emerging social change leaders, and brings a background in gender justice, philanthropy, and leadership development to all of her work. She proudly sits on the Advisory Board of the Third Wave Fund.

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Joy Messinger

Joy Messinger is a passionate community advocate whose life and career is guided by a commitment to social and reproductive justice. Currently calling Chicago home, she has also lived and worked in Central North Carolina and Western New York. Joy is Third Wave Fund's Program Officer and also devotes time to local and national feminist, adoptee justice, Asian American, and LGBTQ community building.

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Rye Young

Rye Young is the Executive Director of Third Wave Fund (www.thirdwavefund.org) which supports and strengthens youth-led gender justice activism focusing on efforts that advance the political power, well-being, and self-determination of communities of color and low-income communities. He serves on the Board of Directors of the New York Abortion Access Fund and Funders for LGBTQ Issues, and serves on the advisory board of A is For. Rye is passionate about expanding opportunities for communities who are most affected by oppression yet remain marginalized in our movements and in philanthropy. He is an avid cook, and ferocious lover of bingo.

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Qs About the T: Talking About Trans* Lives and Experiences
New allies encouraged to attend! This workshop is a 101-level crash course in navigating discussions about the trans* and gender-variant community. Structured as half-lecture, half-Q&A, participants will first build foundational knowledge around privilege and oppression, trans* terminology, and issues affecting the community. The presenter will then open themself up to answer all your burning questions about their own experiences, and what their life is like as a trans*-identified person. All are welcome!
Speakers (click to view): Kai Devlin

Qs About the T: Talking About Trans* Lives and Experiences

Speakers

Kai Devlin

Kai is a queer educator, activist, and youth advocate working toward improving the lives of youth and young people. A Smith College alum, Kai is an M.Ed. candidate at Springfield College in the School Counseling program. He currently serves as a Middle School Advisor for the GEAR UP grant in Springfield Public Schools, a speaker with SpeakOUT Boston, and a freelance LGBTQ consultant and trainer in Massachusetts and beyond.

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Reproductive Justice 101
Heard the term reproductive justice thrown around a lot? Not really sure what it means or where it comes from? As a framework that many social justice organizations and activists base their work on, it’s important for us to understand what it is we are talking about. Join us to have some of those questions answered and engage in a dialogue on the history, meaning, and application of reproductive justice in our work toward achieving reproductive freedom. Hear from facilitators working on reproductive justice in a number of capacities and figure out what it means for you!
Speakers (click to view): Claire Herrmann, Louisa Bernarbane

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers

Claire Herrmann

Claire Herrmann is a third year student at Hampshire College studying reproductive health with a focus on public policy and access. She has been working with the CLPP student group to help run the childcare program during the conference since her first year at Hampshire.

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Louisa Bernarbane

Louisa Benarbane is a first year student at Hampshire College studying international politics and law with a focus on the Middle East and North Africa. She currently co-leads for Students for Justice in Palestine and is a CLPP student group member. She looks forward to working and meeting with all of our wonderful conference attendees as we navigate the intersections of systemic, social and of course, reproductive justice.

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Survival and Resilience in the Child Welfare, Juvenile and Criminal Justice Systems
State interference disproportionately affects the integrity of families in the most vulnerable circumstances, including those facing deep poverty, disability, mental health issues, drug addiction, and incarceration. Advocates from Community Legal Services in Philadelphia, the Incarcerated Parents Project, and Justice Now will discuss how these laws and policies, combined with the lack of concrete, systemic supports, destabilize low income families and communities, and their work to share information, resources and strategies to create wellness and build community power.
Speakers (click to view): Lill Hewko, Mianta McKnight, Maggie Potter, Sarah Coburn, Adina Giannelli

Survival and Resilience in the Child Welfare, Juvenile and Criminal Justice Systems

Speakers

Lill Hewko

Lillian Hewko is an attorney at the Incarcerated Parents Project in Seattle, WA. They use the reproductive justice framework to bring incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals together to advocate for systemic change. A graduate of the University of Washington School of Law, Lillian identifies as a queer mixed-Latinx from a working-class background. Lillian is a board member of Surge, a reproductive justice collaborative.

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Mianta McKnight

Mianta McKnight is a formerly incarcerated juvenile offender tried as an adult who is passionate about incarcerated women. She knows firsthand what the prion experience is like since she served 18 years & 1 day on a 15 year to life sentence and essentially grew up within the prison industrial complex. As a fellow for Justice Now and activist for social change, she is dedicated to challenging inhumane conditions and being a voice for those who are unable to speak for themselves. She attends SFSU and is majoring in dance, which she plans to use to work along with holistic medicine to promote longevity, self-awareness, and self-care.

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Maggie Potter

Maggie is a Social Worker in the Family Advocacy Unit at Community Legal Services in Philadelphia. She advocates for parents to safely maintain or regain custody of their children. She received a joint Master in Social Work (MSW) and Master of Science in Social Policy (MSSP) degree from the University of Pennsylvania. She lives in Philly with her husband and their two year old daughter.

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Sarah Coburn

Sarah Coburn works in the Family Advocacy Unit at Community Legal Services of Philadelphia where she serves indigent parents in the child welfare system, helping them maintain or regain custody of their children. Prior to joining CLS as a Staff Attorney, Sarah worked as a public defender in Philadelphia and was previously employed by the ACLU of PA’s Reproductive Rights Project. She is a CLPP and NLNI alum.

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Adina Giannelli

Trained as a lawyer, Adina Giannelli is a writer, teacher and activist. She lives, works, and agitates in western Massachusetts with her four year old child, where she is at work on her first book, a family memoir titled Ghosts That Haunt Us.

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What's the Deal About Families?

Why is family such a huge issue when it comes to feminism? Join us as we launch into the conference weekend by reigniting conversations begun at last year's pre-conference COFFEE (Conference on Feminism, Families, Equity and Experience). Together we will identify key issues relating to families, parenting, and reproductive justice. This session is open to all who are interested in exploring intersections of families and feminism during the conference weekend.

Speakers (click to view): Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser, Avital Norman Nathman, Natasha Vianna, Tope Fadiran

What's the Deal About Families?

Speakers

Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser

Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser is a Hampshire alum. Former CLPP staff, she organized the first years of this very conference. Now, she's a writer whose emphasis includes family issues.

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Avital Norman Nathman

Avital Norman Nathman is a freelance writer and editor of The Good Mother Myth. Her work has appeared in the NY Times, CNN, The Daily Dot, Cosmopolitan, The Establishment and more. She is also a co-founder of COFFEE.

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Natasha Vianna

Natasha Vianna is a rebelde in tech, a repro justice activist, and co-founder of #NoTeenShame.

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Tope Fadiran

Tope Fadiran is a writer and researcher whose work addresses the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in American culture. She is a research fellow with Political Research Associates, a progressive social justice think tank. Her work has been featured on TIME.com, The Guardian, Salon, Bitch Magazine, and other outlets.

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Saturday Session 1: 1:15PM - 2:45PM

Abortion Access: Threats and Resistance Strategies
Efforts to restrict access to safe and legal abortion persist, disproportionately affecting the most vulnerable people in our society and worldwide. Panelists will talk about current barriers to access and discuss activist strategies to resist the threats, including grassroots, national and international campaigns to overturn restrictions on public funding of abortion; and campaigns that position the right to abortion within the broader reproductive justice and human rights frameworks.
Speakers (click to view): Willie J. Parker, Marlene Gerber Fried, Marlo Barrera, Morgan Hopkins, Yamani Hernandez

Abortion Access: Threats and Resistance Strategies

Speakers

Willie J. Parker

Dr. Willie Parker is an advocate of reproductive, social, racial, and gender justice who seeks to model healthy, inclusive, non-patriarchal masculinity while working for change.

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Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a long time activist for abortion rights and reproductive justice. She is the professor and faculty director of CLPP, the founding president of the National Network of Abortion Funds (NNAF) and the Abortion Rights Fund of Western MA. Marlene is a co-author with Silliman, Ross and Gutierrez of Undivided Rights. She is a recipient of the 2015 NNAF Vanguard Award, the 2014 Felicia Stewart Advocacy Award (APHA), and the SisterSong Warrior Woman Award.

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Marlo Barrera

Marlo Barrera is a New Orleans native doing reproductive rights work in her hometown. As Intake Coordinator of the New Orleans Abortion Fund, she organizes volunteers to answer the hotline and works directly with clients to assist them in funding their abortions. She also works with her hands—cooking, zine making, and poetry making.

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Morgan Hopkins

Morgan Hopkins creates synthesis between the state, federal, and field work of the All* Above All public education campaign. Previously, she worked at the National Network of Abortion Funds. Morgan has a B.A. with Honors in Psychology from Hobart and William Smith Colleges and a Masters in Psychology with a certificate in Women's Studies from the University of Houston-Clear Lake.

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Yamani Hernandez

Yamani Hernandez is the Executive Director of the National Network of Abortion Funds (NNAF), an organization that builds the capacity and power of grassroots member organizations and leverages their direct access to abortion seekers across the country for cultural and political change. She is a member of the Strong Families leadership team and a writer for Echoing Ida, a program of Forward Together.

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Artists United for Reproductive Justice: Conjuring Community Through Art and Culture

Artists United for Reproductive Justice cultivates artistic leadership and strategy that connects uncommon, idealistic, or even radical ideas with everyday life in working to connect art and culture, activists, scholars, and community builders to examine the political implications and social significance of their work and the work of other practitioners historically and today. In this interactive arts-based experience, participants will explore models for amplifying arts practices for reproductive justice in local communities, and collectively draft goals for strengthening our programming around arts and cultural work as well as offering activist best practices and skill shares.

Speakers (click to view): Monica Raye Simpson, Stephanie J. Alvarado

Artists United for Reproductive Justice: Conjuring Community Through Art and Culture

Speakers

Monica Raye Simpson

Monica Raye Simpson is the Executive Director of SisterSong, and has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, and the systematic physical and emotional violence inflicted upon Black people with an emphasis on Black Southerners and LGBTQ people. She is also a singer, full circle Doula and was named a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine & a 40 under 40 leader by the Advocate.

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Stephanie J. Alvarado

Stephanie J. Alvarado is a radical queer Latina feminista poet born and raised in the Bronx, NY by way of Guayaquil, Ecuador. Since becoming politicized in her early adolescence around the power of community organizing, cultural, and artistic activism, she has worked at the intersections of youth organizing, reproductive justice, immigrant rights, racial justice, queer liberation, transnational feminism, and language justice. ¡Pa’lante Siempre Pa’lante!

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Breaking It Down: Identifying and Smashing Barriers to Youth Sexual Health Care

Young people face unique barriers when accessing sexual and reproductive health care, such as: abortion notification laws, access to contraception, Title IX compliance at their institutions, and access to comprehensive sexual health education that reflects their lives, among others. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss barriers unique to young people and discuss the intersections of race, socioeconomic status, ability, gender identity and sexual orientation in a young person's capacity to access needed care. Through resource-mapping and collaborative brainstorming, participants will learn about strategies that they can use to help young people access community resources.

Speakers (click to view): Sadia Arshad, Eshani Dixit

Breaking It Down: Identifying and Smashing Barriers to Youth Sexual Health Care

Speakers

Sadia Arshad

Sadia Arshad is a reproductive justice nerd working in health communications during the day and doing youth empowerment and community engagement work at night. She fell into this work by accident, but couldn't be happier.

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Eshani Dixit

Eshani Dixit is a senior at Rutgers University studying Political Science, Economics, and Women's and Gender Studies. She has served as a member of the Young Women of Color Leadership Council for the past four years and has been involved in reproductive health, rights, and justice advocacy for the past five.

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Criminalizing Pregnant People: the Next Phase of Controlling Our Bodies
Mass incarceration and human rights abuses in the criminal justice system are key concerns for the reproductive justice movement, with a variety of activists working to oppose and mitigate the harms that these systems have created for individuals, families, and communities. Laws and policies criminalizing pregnant people have undermined reproductive autonomy and rights. In particular, pregnant people who use drugs (even legal, prescribed ones) have become vulnerable to criminal prosecution all across the country. Attacks on reproductive rights and justice, the war on drugs, and efforts to put "personhood" measures on the books have advanced unscientific laws and increased stigma. Hear from activists and journalists about how communities are fighting back against this form of reproductive injustice.
Speakers (click to view): Allison Glass, Cherisse Scott, Laura Huss, Nina Martin

Criminalizing Pregnant People: the Next Phase of Controlling Our Bodies

Speakers

Allison Glass

Allison Glass first got connected to reproductive freedom after the home birth of her son as a young, single woman. She now serves as the State Director of Healthy and Free Tennessee where she leads a statewide coalition in shaping policy and fighting for reproductive freedom and sexual health. She has the honor and the challenge of working with, educating, and mobilizing opposition to Tennessee's (very, very red) legislators who far too often work against the interests of women and families.

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Cherisse Scott

Cherisse Scott is the founder and CEO of SisterReach, Tennessee’s only reproductive justice organization. Under Ms. Scott’s leadership, SisterReach has released a 2015 report on the need for comprehensive sex ed for southern youth of color, rolled out their ProWoman Billboard campaign and presented to the United Nations Working Group on the Issue of Discrimination against Women in Law and Practice (UNWGDAW) on the impact of the fetal assault law on TN women.

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Laura Huss

Laura Huss is Editorial and Research Associate at RH Reality Check. Laura received her Master’s from the University of Cape Town in South Africa studying social movements, activism, and community-based development. After graduate school she worked as a researcher in South Africa on issues relating to the incarceration of women, gender-based violence, and sexual assault. Prior to joining RH Reality Check, Laura worked at National Advocates for Pregnant Women where she advocated against punitive attacks on pregnant people, documented hundreds of arrests of pregnant people across the U.S., and conducted research on media misinformation about pregnancy and drug use.

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Nina Martin

Nina Martin is a reporter for the nonprofit investigative news organization ProPublica, covering sex and gender, with a special interest in issues involving pregnancy and maternal health and well-being. She lives and works in Berkeley CA.

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Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop

A common perception of the Manual Vacuum Aspiration (MVA) abortion is that the procedure is scary, complicated and intense. The purpose of this Papaya workshop is to debunk this myth and other myths through education and hands-on activities for a non-clinical audience. Using papayas as uterine models, participants will be introduced to and perform their own MVA abortion on a papaya. In addition to physically practicing the procedure, the audience will also learn and role-play patient-centered language. By gaining a comprehensive understanding of the actual medical procedure, audiences will be better informed and equipped as abortion activists and advocates.

Speakers (click to view): Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre, Stephanie Blaufarb

Demystifying MVA Abortions: The Papaya Workshop

Speakers

Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre

Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre works as a Research Associate at the Reproductive Health Access Project where she manages research studies about abortion, contraception, and miscarriage care. GG is also pursuing a Doctor of Public Health degree at the CUNY Graduate Center.

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Stephanie Blaufarb

Stephanie Blaufarb became passionate about reproductive health during her Peace Corps service where she worked as a community health organizer for adolescent and women's health. Stephanie earned a BA/BS in international affairs from Northeastern University and an MPH from the CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter College. Her focus at the Reproductive Health Access Project has been communications, patient decision aids, and provider training in reproductive health.

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Disability Justice and Reproductive Justice: Clarifying Our Values

In this closed, discussion-oriented session, attendees and facilitators will work together to articulate shared values for reproductive and disability justice that continue to center the needs and experiences of those most marginalized in our communities. We'll begin with a discussion of current barriers to anti-ableist reproductive justice work and move into visioning creative solutions for change. This session is a closed space for participants with disabilities or who identify as disabled, or who could otherwise be considered a part of/benefit from disability community. This includes physical disabilities, learning/cognitive disabilities, chronic illnesses and/or pain, neurological disorders, traumatic brain injuries, mental illness/emotional disabilities/psychic/psychiatric disabilities/madness/psychiatric survivors, Autistics, Deaf people, Blind people, all different kinds of neurovariance (including migraines, PTSD, epilepsy, et al.), and any kind of visible or invisible differences of bodies or brains including unusual appearances/deformities.

Speakers (click to view): Sasha Conley

Disability Justice and Reproductive Justice: Clarifying Our Values

Speakers

Sasha Conley

Sasha Conley is a fourth-year Division III student at Hampshire College studying Disability Studies, Art, and Creative Writing. She engages in work to improve accessibility on Hampshire's campus both physically and academically.

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Don’t Drink the Water: Water Access is a Human Right and Reproductive Justice Issue
Access to safe and clean water is essential to everyone’s health and well-being, but many communities in the US don’t have safe water access. Reproductive, environmental, and racial justice advocates have pointed out that pollutants and toxins in our water supply threaten our children’s health and development, have impacts on reproductive health, and are more likely threaten communities that already suffer some of the worst impacts to environmental degradation and social inequality. The recent water crisis in Flint, MI has drawn new attention to the reality that safe water is something that low-income communities, people of color, and marginalized people and their families have never been able to take for granted. Come hear about how water access is a reproductive justice issue and how activists are fighting for this human right.
Speakers (click to view): Beata Tsosie-Peña, Shana M. griffin, Lindsay Schubiner

Don’t Drink the Water: Water Access is a Human Right and Reproductive Justice Issue

Speakers

Beata Tsosie-Peña

Beata Tsosie-Peña is an educator and poet from Santa Clara Pueblo. The realities of living next to a nuclear weapons complex has called her into environmental health and justice work with the local non-profit organization, Tewa Women United. She believes in the practice and preservation of land-based knowledge, spirituality, language, seeds, and family. Her intentions are for healing, wellness and sustainability for future generations.

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Shana M. griffin

Shana griffin is a black feminist, mother, applied sociologist, activist, and artist based in New Orleans. Her work explores critical issues at the intersection of race and gender-based violence; housing rights and affordability; sexual health and reproductive autonomy; carceral violence and criminalizing policies; climate justice and sustainable ecologies; gender and disaster; reproductive violence and population control; and art and reimagination. Rooted in radical black feminist thought and organizing traditions, Shana’s research and activism challenges policies, practices, and behaviors that restrict, exploit, and regulate the bodies and lives of low-income and working class black women most vulnerable to the violence of poverty, carcerality, polluting environments, reproductive legislation, economic exploitation, and housing discrimination

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Lindsay Schubiner

Lindsay Schubiner is the Senior Program Manager at the Center for New Community, where she works to counter organized nativism in the U.S. Lindsay previously served as a Congressional staffer handling immigration, housing, and health policy, and managed advocacy for sexual rights at American Jewish World Service. She holds a Master of Science from the Harvard School of Public Health.

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Expanding Healthcare Access for Trans People
The reality for many trans folks is that getting access to healthcare continues to be a huge barrier. Come hear from activists and medical professionals who are expanding access to healthcare for trans people. Learn about the work of the Trans Buddy Program, which aims to increase access to care and improve healthcare outcomes for transgender people by providing emotional support to transgender patients during healthcare visits.
Speakers (click to view): Lauren Mitchell, Ricky Hill, Rj Robles, Zil Goldstein

Expanding Healthcare Access for Trans People

Speakers

Lauren Mitchell

Lauren Mitchell is one of the founders of The Doula Project, and part of the leadership team of Trans Buddy. She is also co-author of the upcoming book, The Doulas!: Radical Care for Pregnant People. It is her honor to have served over a thousand clients and have trained hundreds of activists, students, and clinicians over the past ten years.

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Ricky Hill

Ricky Hill is a Jewish, chronically ill, transmasculine rabble-rouser originally from Oklahoma, radicalized in New Mexico, and currently living in Chicago, Illinois. Their work at the Chicago Center for HIV Elimination uses network science to target and integrate prevention, as well as create structural and community-specific interventions on the South Side of the city. They are passionate about understanding the ways in which social determinants of health impact LGBTQI health access and equity, as well as building sustainable service structures in resource deserts. They also believe that bolo ties are infinitely better than bow ties.

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Rj Robles

Rj is a trans, disabled, Latinx living in the rural south. They love to write and perform their poetry through the art of spoken word. They work mostly in the trans community helping trans people get access to all forms of healthcare. They are academically interested in transgender studies, transgender theology, and pastoral care. They are a fierce community organizer and a student in seminary at Vanderbilt Divinity School. They are currently working on their M.Div, preparing for a life in ministry as an ordained Unitarian Universalist and as an aspiring academic.

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How Sex Ed Can End Child Sexual Abuse
The leading conversations about sexual assault/abuse are framed around power and control: sexual assault and abuse have less to do with the sex and more to do with power. Whether we agree with this long-standing idea or not, we must agree that SEX cannot be eliminated for the conversation of SEXual abuse, SEXual assault and rape culture. The aftermath of Child Sexual Abuse (CSA) or sexual violence has tremendous effects on our sex(uality), our ability to form relationships and navigate safer sex. How can comprehensive sex education be a tool to end child sexual abuse? What ideas do we have culturally about teaching sex ed to children? How can sex ed foster reproductive justice for everyone? Join in the discussion to dissect this topic, share ideas, and engage in learning more about “the talk” and how to use it as a tool for empowerment and ending CSA.
Speakers (click to view): Ignacio Rivera

How Sex Ed Can End Child Sexual Abuse

Speakers

Ignacio Rivera

Ignacio Rivera is a trans-gender fluid activist, writer, educator, filmmaker, performance artist and mother. Ignacio has over 20 years experience on multiple fronts including economic justice, anti-racism, anti-violence, and feminist and LGBTQ movements. Ignacio is a 2016 Just Beginnings Collaborative Fellow. JBC is a movement building platform, initiating, cultivating and funding strategic efforts to end child sexual abuse.

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Knowledge is Power – Putting Information about Safe Abortion with Pills into Our Hands
Knowing how to control our fertility is a basic right. This workshop will share two safe and effective protocols for ending an unwanted pregnancy/causing a miscarriage/bringing down your period. Knowledge is power!
Speakers (click to view): Oriana López Uribe, Susan Yanow MSW

Knowledge is Power – Putting Information about Safe Abortion with Pills into Our Hands

Speakers

Oriana López Uribe

Oriana López is a Mexican feminist who advocates for sexual and reproductive rights of young people and women at national, regional and international levels. She is the Deputy Director of Balance, a feminist organization in Mexico, and since 2009 she has coordinated the MARIA Fund. She is a member of the feminist alliance Resurj - Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice.

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Susan Yanow MSW

A long-time reproductive rights activist, Susan Yanow works to expand access to abortion domestically and internationally through consulting projects with organizations including Ibis Reproductive Health, the Reproductive Health Access Project and Venture Strategies (VHSD). She is a cofounder of Women Help Women, an international organization that provides abortion and contraception services, and of the EASE Project (Expanding Abortion Services in the South) which is based in Alabama and Mississippi.

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New Voices, New Visionaries: Towards a Movement Led from the Frontlines / Nuevas voces, nuevas visionarias: hacia un movimiento guiado por lxs que están en el frente de la batalla

Join undocumented and previously detained trans and queer migrants as they discuss how their experiences have illuminated and defined the need for structural change in U.S. society to address racism, homophobia, transphobia, and immigration injustice. Through storytelling and audience participation, panelists will explore the ways that intersections of migration law, LGBT discrimination and structural racism have shaped their lives.

Acompaña a migrantes queer y trans previamente detenidas e indocumentadas mientras ellas platican cómo sus experiencias han iluminado y definido la necesidad del cambio estructural en la sociedad de los E.E.U.U. para abordar los temas de racismo, homofobia, transfobia, y la injusticia de inmigración. A través de historias personales y participación de la audiencia las panelistas van a explorar de manera interseccional como leyes migratorias, discriminación anti-LGBT y racismo estructural han afectado sus vidas.

*lxs – en el español escrito, usamos la “x” para remplazar las terminaciones “o”, “a”, o “@” para palabras con género que hacen referencia a personas. Preferimos usar la “x” porque mostrar una resistencia al binario de género.
*elles – elles se usa como termino inclusivo de todos los géneros y para reconocer que hay personas que no se identifican con ningún género o con más de un género.

This session will be presented in Spanish with simultaneous interpretation into English. If you need English interpretation, please arrive early, as interpretation headsets are limited.

Speakers (click to view): Dora Mejia, Karyna Jaramillo

New Voices, New Visionaries: Towards a Movement Led from the Frontlines / Nuevas voces, nuevas visionarias: hacia un movimiento guiado por lxs que están en el frente de la batalla

Speakers

Dora Mejia

Teodora Mejia Gaspar is a Mexican woman who has lived in Phoenix for 8 years. She is a grandmother and immigrant whose daughters receive DACA, a woman of faith, an activist, and program coordinator for Familias developing support, leadership, and family acceptance. She volunteers at AZ-QUIP/Arcoiris Liberation Team working for health of our communities.

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Karyna Jaramillo

Karyna Jaramillo is a transgender woman from Cuernavaca, México who emigrated to Phoenix, AZ in 1989 to pursue work. She has spent years living the realities of racism, homophobia, and discrimination in Phoenix from society and from the police. She has been detained by ICE three times, and knows first hand how the government and those in power try to destroy the dreams of tod@s nosotr@s (all of us). Currently, Karyna coordinates Arcoiris Liberation Team/Arizona Queer Undocumented Immigrants Project (AZ QUIP), a project defending LGBTI migrant communities. She works with her community both outside and inside detention centers to fight for the rights and liberty of her community, and more broadly for the autonomy and power de cada un@ de nosotr@s (of each of us).

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Queering Reproductive Justice: The Unfinished Revolution
Our issues and people are not separate, we are interconnected. But our movements’ goals have become increasingly narrow and limiting. What is our vision for intersectional base-building across the reproductive justice movement? How do we re-center a truly queer analysis and approach to liberation that is radically inclusive? Come to hear from activists working at the intersections of safety and economic justice, immigrant rights, health and educational equity, gender and reproductive justice, and LGBT liberation.
Speakers (click to view): Sean Saifa Wall, Cecilia Sáenz Becerra, Cole Parke, Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz, Kenyon Farrow

Queering Reproductive Justice: The Unfinished Revolution

Speakers

Sean Saifa Wall

Sean Saifa Wall is an intersex artist and activist whose goal is to create a world that is safe for Black bodies and intersex bodies to exist in. You can connect with him on social media or through his website, saifaemerges.com.

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Cecilia Sáenz Becerra

Cecilia is a bilingual immigrant, queer, Chicana, y desmadrosa! She has grassroots, community organizing, coalition building and management experience on various issues and campaigns, including labor rights, education, economic justice and immigration justice. Raised in PHX she now lives in ATL, providing support, strategy and technical assistance to front-line advocates and grassroots organizers across the country who exist along a varied spectrum of reproductive rights and reproductive justice politics.

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Cole Parke

Cole Parke is the LGBTQ & Gender Justice Researcher at Political Research Associates, a social justice think tank based in Boston. Their research and activism focuses on exposing and challenging right-wing propagators of U.S. culture wars both here and abroad through the Know Your Neighbors campaign (www.kynship.org).

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Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz

Lisa Weiner-Mahfuz is the Vice President of Programs and Development for the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice. She has worked in several movements for social justice with a particular emphasis on building grassroots political power across movements, issues, identities and communities. As a capacity builder, movement builder, cultural worker and writer Weiner-Mahfuz has dedicated much of her organizing life to challenging oppression at the intersections of race, class, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and disability. Her writings can be found in Colonize This! Young Women of Color and Feminism (Seal Press, 2002), Fireweed Magazine's “Mixed Race Issue” (Issue 75), and through on a Web-based project titled BustingBinaries, which she co-authors with Ana Maurine Lara.

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Kenyon Farrow

Kenyon Farrow is a writer and activist. He is the US & Global Health Policy Director with Treatment Action Group. His writing has appeared in many books and publications, and he's working on a collection of essays and a new book on global health and racial justice.

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Reproductive Justice 101
Heard the term reproductive justice thrown around a lot? Not really sure what it means or where it comes from? As a framework that many social justice organizations and activists base their work on, it’s important for us to understand what it is we are talking about. Join us to have some of those questions answered and engage in a dialogue on the history, meaning, and application of reproductive justice in our work toward achieving reproductive freedom. Hear from facilitators working on reproductive justice in a number of capacities and figure out what it means for you!
Speakers (click to view): Namrata Jacob, Chiara Forrester

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers

Namrata Jacob

Namrata is a third year student at Hampshire College studying legal anthropology and reproductive justice, a restless piece of the South Asian diaspora, a lover of dogs and ironic jokes that got too serious and permanent, and a fan of karaoke. She lives for potentially witnessing the anti-capitalist social revolution and Mary Mary releasing another album together, maybe, someday.

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Chiara Forrester

Chiara is a senior at Hampshire College where she studies the ecology of plant-fungal symbioses as well as how Participatory Action Research could be used to make Citizen Science research projects more meaningful and empowering. She was part of the CLPP student group for two years, serving as a Childcare Co-Chair last year.

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Southern Black Healing and Resistance

This is a closed session for people of color, especially those rooted or working in the South. This interactive workshop will explore the role and importance of Black healers and healing traditions in shaping and sustaining lives in the South. In this workshop, we will specifically honor traditions that were sustained and developed by Black folks on the shores of Turtle Island (America). With participants, we will walk through a condensed history of Black southern healing traditions, examining how we took what we knew, integrated what was here, and developed rituals, medicines, tools and practices for survival and quality of life right here in the South. Additionally, we will vision a trajectory for healing justice and birth justice in communities of color, while discussing, sharing, and honoring the root traditions of our spiritual and cultural grandmothers.

Speakers (click to view): Jamarah Amani, Tamika Middleton

Southern Black Healing and Resistance

Speakers

Jamarah Amani

Jamarah Amani is a Licensed Midwife who believes in the power of birth and that every baby has a human right to be breastfed. Her mission is to do her part to build a movement for Birth Justice locally, nationally and globally. A community organizer from the age of sixteen, Jamarah has worked with several organizations across the United States and in Africa on various public health issues, including HIV prevention, infant mortality risk reduction, access to emergency contraception, access to midwifery care and an end to shackling of incarcerated pregnant/birthing people.

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Tamika Middleton

Tamika Middleton is an organizer, birthworker, and homeschooling mama. She is passionate about and active in struggles that affect Black women’s lives. She sometimes performs as a member of The NALO Movement. She is also passionate about birthing and healing, and is the coordinator of Kindred Southern Healing Justice Collective.

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Telling Our Stories To Create Change

This session, by and for young people, will introduce participants to the power and art of effective storytelling for advocacy. Participants will learn how stories have sparked critical movement moments and lead to lasting change. Facilitators will share key components of narratives that engage an audience and provide space for participants to practice storytelling to hone their skills. Participants will also identify their own reproductive justice stories and begin to think about how to share them to shift cultural values. Please be aware that participants will be asked to think about their reproductive justice/injustice experiences

Speakers (click to view): Prina Patel, Simran Kaur

Telling Our Stories To Create Change

Speakers

Prina Patel

Prina Patel grew up in rural Oregon and attended Smith College for undergraduate education. At Smith, Prina began her studies in neuroscience, but by her senior year realized that she wanted to pursue a career in reproductive justice policy and activism. Prina would like to attend law school in the near future, and continue advocating for minoritized populations.

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Simran Kaur

Simran Kaur was born, raised, and educated in Salt Lake City, Utah. With degrees in gender studies and chemistry, she is currently pursuing an MD at the University of Utah School of Medicine. Simran hopes to deliver and engage in culturally-relevant reproductive and sexual health care to minoritized populations.

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Yonce Taught Me: Black Femme Formations

In the time of Beyonce, much of what we learn about Black Femininity comes from outside of the black femm[inine] community. How can we use our collective super powers to re-construct a flawless feminism that centers black culture? In this workshop we will develop strategies for interrupting transphobic and anti-black representations of black femininity as well as build a stronger network of black cis femmes in solidarity with our black trans femm[inine] family. This is a closed workshop geared towards black folks (trans, cis, and gender nonconforming) who are femme or ID somewhere on a feminine spectrum.

Speakers (click to view): Che Johnson-Long

Yonce Taught Me: Black Femme Formations

Speakers

Che Johnson-Long

Che J. Long is a Queer Black Femme, community organizer, and trained herbalist who hails from Los Angeles. She is currently the Program Director of Georgia Womens Action for New Directions developing Black Rural strategies for challenging the Nuclear Industry.

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Zines! Putting Consent into Practice

Isn’t it nice when someone asks before giving you a hug? Let’s talk about setting boundaries and practicing consent to demonstrate respect for our bodies and our communities. We’ll explore a framework for consent, create a toolbox of language, and engage in dialogue that builds healthy relationships. Push back against rape culture with the creative and accessible medium of mini (maga)ZINES as a platform for radical communication!

Speakers (click to view): Allison Scott, Jena Duncan

Zines! Putting Consent into Practice

Speakers

Allison Scott

Allison Scott is a creative queer Bay Area babe who recently moved to the Pioneer Valley to explore all the wonderful art and activism! With consent and open communication as leading values, Allison works to build healthy relationships, support youth empowerment and grow and expand community. Creating safe and supportive spaces for people to express and explore themselves is Allison's passion.

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Jena Duncan

Jena Duncan is an art maker and youth worker that builds life in the abundant pioneer valley with a heart warming community. Her creative endeavors explore the meaning and production of identity and culture. She teaches on a variety of topics and is interested in creating safe and supportive spaces for all identities to engage in something with passion. Her faithful sidekick is a cat named Sophie.

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Saturday Session 2: 3:15PM - 4:45PM

A Teen Parent Inclusive Movement

The ability to decide when and how to have children is a crucial aspect of the reproductive justice movement. Throughout history, some women have been discouraged, coerced and outright prevented from being parents, including teen parents. Young people who have children are often stigmatized, shamed, and disenfranchised in their role as parents. This workshop seeks to foster a conversation on the intersectional issues impacting young parents, explore the contributions that young parents bring to the reproductive justice movement, and discuss the ways in which stigma against young parents is upheld through the reproductive control of youth.

Speakers (click to view): Christina Martinez, Gloria Malone, Natasha Vianna, Lisette Engel

A Teen Parent Inclusive Movement

Speakers

Christina Martinez

Christina Martinez is an early childhood educator and community correspondent for Sacramento Voices, a project of the Maynard Institute for Journalism. In her work and writing, Christina is dedicated to elevating the stories of young parents & their children.

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Gloria Malone

Gloria Malone is a writer, social media consultant, and speaker. She is a member of Echoing Ida, co-founder of #NoTeenShame, and the founder of TeenMomNYC.com. Connect with her on twitter @GloriaMalone.

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Natasha Vianna

Natasha Vianna is a rebelde in tech, a repro justice activist, and co-founder of #NoTeenShame.

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Lisette Engel

Lisette Engel is co-founder of the #NoTeenShame movement. She's an advocate, public speaker, blogger and mama based in the Washington, D.C area. Lisette has lobbied on Capitol Hill for programs that support young families and is active in promoting policies that support young women to make their own reproductive choices.

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A Timeline Installation on Resiliency Strategies to Transform the Medical Industrial Complex
The medical industrial complex is an industry based on pathologizing the most marginalized communities–including Black & People of Color, People with Disabilities, low income, incarcerated, LGBTQGNC & Two Spirit, and immigrant communities, and so many others who have been experimented on, policed, and institutionalized–under the guise of 'national security' and 'healthy communities'. We will explore notions and history of 'health and healthy' in relationship to capitalism, population control, and policing our bodies through scientific racism and medicalization. We will build on to a timeline installation of what it means to individually and collectively resist and transform these histories towards our collective well-being outside of the state.
Speakers (click to view): Cara Page

A Timeline Installation on Resiliency Strategies to Transform the Medical Industrial Complex

Speakers

Cara Page

Cara Page is a Black queer feminist cultural worker & organizer. She is the current Executive Director of the Audre Lorde Project, an Organizing Center in NYC for Lesbian, Gay, Bi, Two Spirit, Trans & Gender Non-Conforming People of Color. For the past 20+ years she has worked within the LGBTSTGNQ liberation movement, and the reproductive, racial and economic justice movements.

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Abortion Access in Latin America / El acceso al aborto en América Latina

Latin America is home to five of the seven countries in the world in which abortion is banned in all instances, even when the life of the pregnant person is at risk. Ninety five percent of people of reproductive age in the region live under abortion restrictions, and unsafe abortion is estimated to be the cause of one out of every eight pregnancy/birth-related deaths. The laws criminalizing abortion in the region have been inherited from colonial powers, the legacy of the Spanish and Portuguese empires; today, the global agenda of the religious right fuels opposition to abortion. Come to this session to hear how activists are mobilizing to reclaim reproductive rights as human rights.

Cinco de los siete países en el mundo en los cuales el aborto esta penalizado en todas las instancias, incluso cuando la vida de la mujer esta en peligro, se encuentran en America Latina. El noventa y cinco por ciento de las mujeres en edad reproductiva viven en lugares en donde las leyes restringen el acceso al aborto. Se estima que el aborto ilegal es la causa de una de cada 8 muertes maternas. Estas leyes que penalizan el aborto son el legado de los imperios español y portugués. Hoy, la agenda global de la derecha religiosa es la que continua oponiéndose a la despenalizacion del aborto. Ven a esta sesión a escuchar como activistas de la region se estan movilizando para reclamar que los derechos de las mujeres son derechos humanos.

This session will be presented in Spanish with simultaneous interpretation into English. If you need English interpretation, please arrive early, as interpretation headsets are limited.

Speakers (click to view): Cora Fernandez Anderson, Yaneris González Gómez , Cristina Quintanilla, Oriana López Uribe

Abortion Access in Latin America / El acceso al aborto en América Latina

Speakers

Cora Fernandez Anderson

Cora Fernandez Anderson is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Latin American Politics at Hampshire College. Her research focuses on human rights and women's movements in Latin America. She is currently researching the campaigns to decriminalize abortion in the Southern Cone countries.

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Yaneris González Gómez

Yaneris González Gómez has been an activist for over 15 years working with grassroots organizations and community groups on issues such as human rights, gender based violence, youth’s sexual and reproductive health and rights, HIV and AIDS and vulnerabilized communities, LGBTQQI+ rights, racism, immigrant rights, and more. Yaneris is an “artivist” using arts for justice.

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Oriana López Uribe

Oriana López is a Mexican feminist who advocates for sexual and reproductive rights of young people and women at national, regional and international levels. She is the Deputy Director of Balance, a feminist organization in Mexico, and since 2009 she has coordinated the MARIA Fund. She is a member of the feminist alliance Resurj - Realizing Sexual and Reproductive Justice.

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Birthing a Movement
This workshop will explore how control over birthing experiences has been a part of the broader fight for reproductive rights and body sovereignty. Speakers will discuss the history of medicalized birth, racism's role in creating health disparities, the move of birth out of the hands of midwives, efforts to address obstetric violence, and efforts to expand the doula and midwifery models of care. We will highlight the need for education, access, and support for marginalized pregnant/birthing/parenting people, including young people of color, incarcerated people (and those under correctional supervision), and immigrants and undocumented people. Folks in these communities often have the least access to quality care and birth options, but the greatest need. Whether you squat to release a pregnancy or squat to birth your baby, midwifery care can be lifesaving and life-affirming.
Speakers (click to view): Sabia C. Wade, Indra Lusero, Jamarah Amani, Farah Diaz-Tello, Symone A. New, Kerry McDonald

Birthing a Movement

Speakers

Sabia C. Wade

Sabia Wade is a full spectrum doula, a reproductive justice advocate and aspiring home birth midwife. As a queer woman of color, she finds it imperative to create health related infrastructure that is accessible to all members of every orientation and identity - across every socio-economic status.

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Indra Lusero

Indra Lusero is a reproductive justice attorney and entrepreneur and proud to have been named “All Around Reproductive Justice Champion” by the Colorado Organization for Latina Opportunity and Reproductive Rights. Indra is the founder and director of Elephant Circle and the Birth Rights Bar Association.

Groups audience: 

Jamarah Amani

Jamarah Amani is a Licensed Midwife who believes in the power of birth and that every baby has a human right to be breastfed. Her mission is to do her part to build a movement for Birth Justice locally, nationally and globally. A community organizer from the age of sixteen, Jamarah has worked with several organizations across the United States and in Africa on various public health issues, including HIV prevention, infant mortality risk reduction, access to emergency contraception, access to midwifery care and an end to shackling of incarcerated pregnant/birthing people.

Groups audience: 

Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah Diaz-Tello, JD, is a Senior Staff Attorney at National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW). Her work focuses on the rights to medical decision-making and birthing with dignity, and on using the international human rights framework to protect the humanity of pregnant women regardless of their circumstances. A proud Texan, she is an alumna of UT Austin & the CUNY Law School.

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Symone A. New

Symone New is The Doula Project's External Partnerships Coordinator and has practiced as a full-spectrum doula since 2010. In addition to her passion for reproductive justice, Symone enjoys cooking, reading, farmers markets, tea, and theater. In equal measure, Symone is a proud native New Yorker, CLPP and RRASC alum.

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Kerry McDonald

Kerry McDonald is a full spectrum Doula. She works with Prison Birth Project, where she facilitates a childbirth education group in prison and provides Doula services to incarcerated folks. Kerry is based in Boston and in the Hudson River Valley.

Groups audience: 

Coming Home: The Love & Struggle Between Trans & Reproductive Justice

In reproductive justice there has been a growing question around where and how trans identity, issues and movement building intersects. How do we build stronger connections to trans movement building within reproductive justice that also uplifts and honors the work of cis women of color? What are the barriers to building stronger solidarity across movements? How can we begin to build models of collaboration from a place of wholeness, history and accountability? Join us as we share reflections and questions, identify historical and present day models that have built containers to house our intersecting movements, and connect those who are interested in building a national gathering of trans people of color and supporters to talk about trans birth and reproductive justice.

Speakers (click to view): Lucia Leandro Gimeno, Rye Young, Marianne Bullock, Micky Bee, Jasmine Burnett

Coming Home: The Love & Struggle Between Trans & Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Lucia Leandro Gimeno

Lucia Leandro Gimeno is an Afro-Latinx, trans masculine femme bruja/organizer based in Atlanta, GA. A graduate of Columbia University’s School of Social Work, LL lived in New York City for 15 years organizing with queer and trans people of color communities. A current member of Black Lives Matter – Atlanta chapter, LL is also a future full-spectrum birthworker doing capacity building with The Queer & Trans People of Color Birthwerq Project to help mend the disconnect between trans justice and reproductive justice.

Groups audience: 

Rye Young

Rye Young is the Executive Director of Third Wave Fund (www.thirdwavefund.org) which supports and strengthens youth-led gender justice activism focusing on efforts that advance the political power, well-being, and self-determination of communities of color and low-income communities. He serves on the Board of Directors of the New York Abortion Access Fund and Funders for LGBTQ Issues, and serves on the advisory board of A is For. Rye is passionate about expanding opportunities for communities who are most affected by oppression yet remain marginalized in our movements and in philanthropy. He is an avid cook, and ferocious lover of bingo.

Groups audience: 

Marianne Bullock

Marianne Bullock is one of the founders and Directors of The Prison Birth Project. She is an organizer and full spectrum doula.

Groups audience: 

Micky Bee

Micky Bee is a magical Black transfemme army brat turned performance artist. She has worked four years in Atlanta on HIV/AIDS prevention and Co-directs the “Southern Fried Queer Pride” festival. Currently, she is the Regional Organizer for the Transgender Law Center at Southerners on New Ground collaboration. She is determined to get “10s” across the board for Trans/GNC people in the South.

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Jasmine Burnett

Jasmine Burnett is a national organizer, writer and strategist in the Reproductive Justice movement. She serves as the Field Director with New Voices for Reproductive Justice. She leads and expands their work in the "Rustbelt Region," home to the most politically volatile and racially conservative Northern states in the U.S.

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Fund Abortion, Build Power! Activism for Direct Service and Movement Building

Abortion funds, particularly in the South, are innovating around what it means to address immediate abortion access needs while working towards long term cultural and political change; in other words, what it means to fund abortion and build power. In pursuit of reproductive justice, abortion funds are also transforming the practice of funding from a charitable action into a movement building vehicle by working to center the leadership of people from communities most affected by abortion access issues. In this interactive session, attendees will simulate building their own abortion funds using a reproductive justice framework and explore topics such as intake, volunteer recruitment, leadership development, fundraising, and movement building.

Speakers (click to view): Bianca Campbell, Tiffany Tai

Fund Abortion, Build Power! Activism for Direct Service and Movement Building

Speakers

Bianca Campbell

Bianca Campbell is the Movement Building Coordinator at the National Network of Abortion Funds, where we believe in funding abortion + building power. She writes with the Echoing Ida crew and is a board member of ARC-Southeast, a new reproductive fund and advocacy organization in Atlanta, GA. She's previously been an abortion counselor and labor doula. Connect with her @biancaacamp.

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Tiffany Tai

Tiffany Tai is the Member Support Coordinator at the National Network of Abortion Funds, where she provides organizational development and capacity-building support to abortion funds across the country. She is also a founding member of the Boston chapter of the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum. Tiffany is a RRASC alum and UMass Amherst alum.

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HIV/AIDS is a Reproductive Justice Issue!
Mass Incarceration. Poverty. Homophobia. Gender Inequity. Lack of Access to Quality Healthcare. What's really fueling the HIV/AIDS pandemic? This panel will explore the political and public health context of HIV/AIDS, review recent policy wins and losses that affect the lives of people living with HIV and their families, and discuss oppressive policies and patterns that make some communities the most vulnerable to the virus and its effects. Let's talk about how we can turn the tide together!
Speakers (click to view): Renae Taylor, Ricky Hill, Kenyon Farrow

HIV/AIDS is a Reproductive Justice Issue!

Speakers

Renae Taylor

Renae Taylor is a community organizer and activist working for trans communities, communities impacted by HIV/AIDS, and Black liberation.

Groups audience: 

Ricky Hill

Ricky Hill is a Jewish, chronically ill, transmasculine rabble-rouser originally from Oklahoma, radicalized in New Mexico, and currently living in Chicago, Illinois. Their work at the Chicago Center for HIV Elimination uses network science to target and integrate prevention, as well as create structural and community-specific interventions on the South Side of the city. They are passionate about understanding the ways in which social determinants of health impact LGBTQI health access and equity, as well as building sustainable service structures in resource deserts. They also believe that bolo ties are infinitely better than bow ties.

Groups audience: 

Kenyon Farrow

Kenyon Farrow is a writer and activist. He is the US & Global Health Policy Director with Treatment Action Group. His writing has appeared in many books and publications, and he's working on a collection of essays and a new book on global health and racial justice.

Groups audience: 

Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-based Sex Education for All

Our formal, school-based sex education is lacking. But what about our sexual pleasure education? How do we learn to make ourselves and our partners feel sexual pleasure, confidently and consensually? This workshop will explore how we learn about consensual pleasure by discussing some of our most pleasurable spots—the G-Spot, C-Spot (clitoris) and P-Spot (prostate). Where are these spots? What kind of sex toys, lubricants and techniques can we use to help us make them feel good? How can practicing consent lead to greater sexual pleasure? Walk away feeling empowered by new knowledge about how to bring yourself and your partners intentional pleasure in a straight-forward, safe and accessible environment.

Speakers (click to view): Yana Tallon-Hicks

Hitting the Spot: Pleasure-based Sex Education for All

Speakers

Yana Tallon-Hicks

Yana Tallon-Hicks is a sex writer and educator, former CLPP RRASC grant recipient, and a Hampshire graduate. Yana studies Marriage & Family Therapy at Antioch University on her path to becoming a sex therapist. Her sex writing has been published locally and nationally and can be found weekly in her sex column, The V-Spot, in the Valley Advocate. Connect with her at yanatallonhicks.com, and on Instagram @the_vspot.

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How Do You Bring Feminism to High School?

How do you bring feminism into high school culture, curriculum, and community? This caucus, facilitated by co-leaders of the Northampton High School International Women's Rights Club, will lead a create a space for students, educators, and parents working to bring feminism to their school communities to share visions and strategies. This session is open to people at all levels of experience with activism and social justice issues.

Speakers (click to view): Hannah Crand, Lucien Baskin, Sylvia Venus Shread

How Do You Bring Feminism to High School?

Speakers

Hannah Crand

Hannah Crand is a leader of the International Women's Rights Club at her high school, where she works primarily on educating the student body and changing the climate of my school. As an intersectional club, the International Women's Rights Club frequently collaborate with the GSA, SOCA, and Environmental Club.

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Lucien Baskin

As a student at Northampton High School, Lucien Baskin has been involved in creating dialogues around issues of social justice within his school community. As a leader of the International Women's Rights Club, he has worked with other student activists to form an annual social justice week, and has sought to make the school curriculum more inclusive of groups that have traditionally been excluded from classes.

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Sylvia Venus Shread

Sylvia Shread is a 16 year old Northampton High School student who participates in all social justice clubs at her school, including Environmental Club, Students of Color Alliance, Gender Sexuality Alliance, and International Women's Rights Club. She is also a co-leader of IWRC. With the help of other leaders she is organizing Social Justice Week which connects the clubs and works to teach NHS students about intersectionality.

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How to keep on living when the world wants you dead:building healing&survival strategies for queer&trans women&femmes of color

This is a closed space for queer and trans women and femmes of color to share, collectively heal, and envision futures and communities where our wellness, labor, and existence are uplifted and valued. By prioritizing the presence and experience of sick and disabled femmes, we will explore survival strategies for navigating the impact of systemic oppression on our health and wellness. Participants will leave the session with greater knowledge of how to support and uplift queer and trans women and femmes of color across intersections, within movement/community building, and beyond. This space will cultivate community connections in order to facilitate individual and collective healing through accountability to and compassion for ourselves and each other.

Speakers (click to view): Morgan Robyn Collado, Noreen Khimji

How to keep on living when the world wants you dead:building healing&survival strategies for queer&trans women&femmes of color

Speakers

Morgan Robyn Collado

Morgan Robyn Collado is a fat trans Latina whose writing focuses on leaving a legacy for girls like us. Morgan has published a book of poetry, Make Love to Rage.

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Noreen Khimji

Noreen Khimji is a disabled queer & trans south asian femme artist, activist, doula, and poet whose work embodies survival as resistance. They are the co-founder of cicada collective, a grassroots abortion doula and volunteer practical support program in North Texas.

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Movement Building: Mobilizing the Voices of Black Women

Black women get candidates elected! As a voting bloc, when engaged and informed on the issues that impact them, their families and their communities, Black women mobilize at a greater rate than any of their peers across race, ethnicity, class, and even gender. During our presentation we will highlight what those policy issues are and why they are so meaningful and impactful for Black women. We will then dive into specific strategies and tactics that have been successful in engaging and mobilizing Black women as activists who can lead a movement and use their voting power in support of reproductive justice for all.

Speakers (click to view): Dr. Krystal Redman, Marcela Howell, Nourbese Flint, T. Omi Pennick

Movement Building: Mobilizing the Voices of Black Women

Speakers

Dr. Krystal Redman

Dr. Krystal Redman brings over 10 years of experience in managing low-income and women focused public health access and community-based youth development programs. Previously, Dr. Redman served as the Senior Project Director, Maternal and Child Health, at the Georgia Department of Public Health, where she worked on creating greater healthcare access for women throughout the state of Georgia. Dr. Redman received her Bachelors of Science in Sociology from University of California, Riverside and a Masters of Health Administration from University of Southern California, Los Angeles, and her Doctorates of Public Health from Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California.

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Marcela Howell

Advocate and policy strategist Marcela Howell is the founder and current Executive Director of In Our Own Voice: National Black Women’s Reproductive Justice Agenda, a non-profit organization devoted to lifting up the voices and leadership of Black women on national and state policy issues. With over 35 years of experience advocating for women’s rights and empowerment, she is recognized for her expertise in strategic communications, leadership development and policy forecasting.

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Nourbese Flint

Nourbese Flint is a blerd with a background in reproductive justice, journalism, all things X-Men and Batman related, matte lipsticks, Bob's Burgers, and Star Trek. She is currently working at Black Women for Wellness where she directs policy, RJ programs, civic engagement graphics, and keeping markers and crayons organized.

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T. Omi Pennick

T. Omi Pennick, MPH is currently the Communications and Development Coordinator for SisterLove, Incorporated. She is a graduate of Xavier University of Louisiana and received her Master of Public Health from Tulane University in 2002. In the past, Tiffany has worked in the field of women’s and adolescent reproductive health with various private and non-profit entities including Emory University Rollins School of Public Health, the National Institute of Health, Messages of Empowerment Productions, LLC, Agenda for Children, and HERO for Children. She has helped to design, implement, and disseminate various Evidenced Based Interventions both nationally and internationally in Atlanta, Georgia, St. Marteen, Netherland Antilles, and in Cape Town and Durban, South Africa.

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Queer Organizing Down South
This session will uplift the organizing in queer communities in the U.S. South. Activists working with and for queer communities will share their unique experiences of doing this work in this region. What does it mean to do this work in our queer communities? The session will include time for questions from participants, and a brainstorming session on how we can continue these conversations.
Speakers (click to view): Paulina Helm-Hernandez, cortez wright, Oriaku Njoku

Queer Organizing Down South

Speakers

Paulina Helm-Hernandez

Paulina Helm-Hernandez is a queer femme cha-cha girl, artist, trainer, political organizer, strategist & trouble-maker-at-large from Veracrúz, México. This Chicana grew up in rural North Carolina, and is currently growing roots in Atlanta, GA. She has been the Co-Director of Southerners on New Ground (SONG) for 9 years.

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cortez wright

Cortez Wright is a Black Southern Non Binary Queer Femme feminist, digital organizer, writer, and communications professional with over 5 years of experience working at the intersection of racial justice, queer & trans liberation, and reproductive justice in Georgia and the South. Currently, they are the Digital Communications and Development Coordinator at SPARK Reproductive Justice NOW, where they lead SPARK's digital engagement, social media presence, and communications strategy.

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Oriaku Njoku

Oriaku Njoku, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast, works at the intersection of meaningful abortion access, queer liberation and reproductive justice. Currently, she ensures funding for families seeking abortion care and advocates for individuals and their chosen families in the Southeast. As a big advocate of self-care, Oriaku uses her time off with the love of her life, her ragamuffin dogs, and cupcakes. Connect with her @oreawku on twitter - all views her own.

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Reproductive Justice in Indigenous Communities
Panelists will share their strategies and experiences working within indigenous communities on issues of reproductive health, rights, and justice. Topics explored will include current legislative attacks on indigenous communities, intersections of environmental and reproductive justice, native motherhood and parenting in academia, and two-spirit identity. Participants will leave with a grounding of reproductive justice tactics within indigenous communities.
Speakers (click to view): Ashley Nicole McCray, Beata Tsosie-Peña, Coya White Hat-Artichoker

Reproductive Justice in Indigenous Communities

Speakers

Ashley Nicole McCray

Ashley is a proud Oglala Lakota (Bad Face Band), Sicangu Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, & Absentee Shawnee (Horse(Deer) Clan - Healer division) woman. She is a single mother of 3, a graduate student at the University of Oklahoma where she founded Indigenize OU, and a community organizer fighting for restorative justice for indigenous peoples through decolonization and reindigenization. She was recognized by the White House as a 2015 WHO Champion of Change for Young Women Empowering Communities for her efforts toward diversity & inclusion on campus, the recipient of the Norman Human Rights Commission's 2015 Norman Human Rights Award for her efforts in indigenous justice, and a CoreAlign Speaking Race to Power fellow.

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Beata Tsosie-Peña

Beata Tsosie-Peña is an educator and poet from Santa Clara Pueblo. The realities of living next to a nuclear weapons complex has called her into environmental health and justice work with the local non-profit organization, Tewa Women United. She believes in the practice and preservation of land-based knowledge, spirituality, language, seeds, and family. Her intentions are for healing, wellness and sustainability for future generations.

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Coya White Hat-Artichoker

Coya was born and raised on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota; she is a proud enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Coya has been doing activist work in various communities and movements since the age of 15

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Say Her Name: Shifting Strategies in Movements for Police Accountability and Reproductive Justice

Numerous Black women have been killed by or after encounters with police, yet Black women have been erased from the national conversation on police killings. How is state violence experienced by Black women, girls, and gender nonconforming people in ways that are similar and different to other members of our communities? How do individual incidents reflect long standing patterns of gender and sexuality-specific policing and criminalization of race, poverty and place? What is the role of law enforcement in regulating racially gendered bodies and sexualities in the carceral state? How does bringing Black women's experiences to the center of the current discourse around racial profiling, police violence, mass incarceration expand our understanding of the issues and shift our strategies and demands? Join us for a collective conversation, skill share, and strategy session around these questions and more!

Speakers (click to view): Andrea Ritchie

Say Her Name: Shifting Strategies in Movements for Police Accountability and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Andrea Ritchie

Andrea Ritchie is a Black lesbian attorney and organizer whose work has focused on profiling, policing and police violence, and criminalization of women and LGBTQ people of color over the past two and a half decades. She is a Senior Soros Justice Fellow, co-author of Say Her Name, A Roadmap for Change, Queer (In)Justice and Law Enforcement Violence Against Women and Transgender People of Color: An Organizer's Toolkit.

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The Abortion Provider Training Challenge: The State of Abortion Training Today

Most people don't know that only 6% of family medicine residency programs and only half of OB/GYN residency programs provide training in abortion care. It is also not widely known that state-by-state restrictions prevent physician's assistants and nurses from receiving training in abortion care. Some clinics have to fly in providers due to the shortage of abortion providers that this lack of training has created. In this workshop we will discuss the current training environment and strategies for change used around the country. We will meet in breakout groups to further delve into training and strategizing for change.

Speakers (click to view): Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre, Stephanie Blaufarb, Laura Riker

The Abortion Provider Training Challenge: The State of Abortion Training Today

Speakers

Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre

Gabrielle (GG) deFiebre works as a Research Associate at the Reproductive Health Access Project where she manages research studies about abortion, contraception, and miscarriage care. GG is also pursuing a Doctor of Public Health degree at the CUNY Graduate Center.

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Stephanie Blaufarb

Stephanie Blaufarb became passionate about reproductive health during her Peace Corps service where she worked as a community health organizer for adolescent and women's health. Stephanie earned a BA/BS in international affairs from Northeastern University and an MPH from the CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter College. Her focus at the Reproductive Health Access Project has been communications, patient decision aids, and provider training in reproductive health.

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Laura Riker

A background in Women’s Studies and abortion advocacy led Laura Riker to grad school, where she interned at a community health center and became interested in the clinical side of reproductive rights. At RHAP, she organizes primary care clinicians from across the country to work together to expand access to comprehensive reproductive health care. Laura holds a Masters of Social Work from Columbia University.

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Trials and Triumph of Being Radical from the Inside Out

Hear directly from currently incarcerated individuals and build strategy and support with formerly incarcerated Justice Now activists in this interactive session. Presenters will share their vision of abolition and inspiring resilience through stories of the trials and triumphs of being radical from the inside out. Join us as we dream beyond prison walls to build a future free of prisons and state violence where families are whole and communities are supported.

 

Speakers (click to view): Mianta McKnight, Misty Rojo

Trials and Triumph of Being Radical from the Inside Out

Speakers

Mianta McKnight

Mianta McKnight is a formerly incarcerated juvenile offender tried as an adult who is passionate about incarcerated women. She knows firsthand what the prion experience is like since she served 18 years & 1 day on a 15 year to life sentence and essentially grew up within the prison industrial complex. As a fellow for Justice Now and activist for social change, she is dedicated to challenging inhumane conditions and being a voice for those who are unable to speak for themselves. She attends SFSU and is majoring in dance, which she plans to use to work along with holistic medicine to promote longevity, self-awareness, and self-care.

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Misty Rojo

Misty Rojo is part of a collective leadership structure at Justice Now, where she is the first co-director that has lived experience with incarceration. In the 3 years that Misty has come on board, she worked to helped the push to get SB 1135 passed to protect against coercive sterilizations in California women's prisons in 2014. In 2015, after 3 years of campaigning, she got a bill passed to expand access to an alternative custody program. Misty is a hardcore abolitionist believing all aspects of the criminal justice system and PIC need to be dismantled.

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Working at the Intersection of Religion, Spirituality and Reproductive Justice
For many of us, our activist work is guided by our religious or spiritual beliefs. At the same time, many of us work with, provide services to, and advocate on behalf of individuals who come from diverse religious traditions. Join panelists from from diverse religious traditions as we discuss connecting our religious and spiritual lives and working for reproductive justice, abortion rights, and LGBTQ justice, and talk about how we bring those views back to our home communities while respecting others' beliefs. Participants will gain an understanding of why collaborative partnerships with faith communities can be important in this work, how religious leaders are currently engaging with the movement, and learn about examples of successful religious/secular partnerships from progressive movements.
Speakers (click to view): Willie J. Parker, Rev. Jason Lydon, Toni M. Bond Leonard, Annie Krol, Sina Sam

Working at the Intersection of Religion, Spirituality and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Willie J. Parker

Dr. Willie Parker is an advocate of reproductive, social, racial, and gender justice who seeks to model healthy, inclusive, non-patriarchal masculinity while working for change.

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Rev. Jason Lydon

Rev. Jason M. Lydon is a Unitarian Universalist community minister and the National Director of Black and Pink, an open family of LGBTQ prisoners and 'free world' allies who support each other.

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Toni M. Bond Leonard

One of the founding RJ mothers, Toni Bond Leonard has been an advocate for reproductive health, rights and justice since 1990. A scholar, Toni's current scope of work focuses on creating theologies of RJ and the ethics of reproduction.

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Annie Krol

Annie Krol is a queer Jewish convert who grew up east of Cleveland, Ohio, and returned in 2014 to work as NARAL Pro-Choice Ohio's Northern organizer. Annie has served as a doula and advocate for the Buffalo refugee community and is also employed as a freelance political puppeteer, stilt artist, and street performer. She is extremely extroverted and works enthusiastically with hundreds of volunteers in five cities.

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Sina Sam

Sina Sam is a Khmer American community organizer from Washington State. With intersectional education in Women's Studies and Public Policy, her advocacy work centers around violence prevention, reproductive health and SE Asian community needs. She is an experienced facilitator, lobbying for policies that benefit communities of color, orientation, immigration status and poverty. Passionate about intersectional justice, she is dedicated to strengthening and healing all our communities.

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Saturday Session 3: 5:15PM - 6:45PM

#FlipTheScript: Centering Adoptee Voices Within Reproductive Justice

Within reproductive justice movement spaces, conversations about adoption are often centered on the rights of potential adoptive parents, especially LGBTQ people & same-sex couples, single people, disabled people, and/or people of color. Where are the adult adoptees in these discussions? How has the language of "equality" been appropriated to promote an agenda that excludes adoptees' voices and the social conditions that lead to transnational adoption? What are the ways in which adoptees' rights to connect to their first and birth families are ignored when we are not included? Join two queer Korean adoptees for a discussion at the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality to complicate and critique current narratives about adoption, rights, equality, and justice.

Speakers (click to view): Joy Messinger, Yong Chan Miller

#FlipTheScript: Centering Adoptee Voices Within Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Joy Messinger

Joy Messinger is a passionate community advocate whose life and career is guided by a commitment to social and reproductive justice. Currently calling Chicago home, she has also lived and worked in Central North Carolina and Western New York. Joy is Third Wave Fund's Program Officer and also devotes time to local and national feminist, adoptee justice, Asian American, and LGBTQ community building.

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Yong Chan Miller

Yong Chan Miller lives in Oakland, CA, and is the executive director of Surge. She has worked in social justice movements for over 20 years primarily at the intersections of race, class, and gender.

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Blood, Memories and other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice

This session is intended for Brown, Indigenous, Black, Asian, Pacific Islander, and other people of color. Memories are carried between generations in many different ways. Many of us, cultural workers, full spectrum birth workers and reproductive justice organizers of color understand the importance to (re)learn and (re)member traditional medicine as we work towards body literacy, autonomy and freedom. Menstruation can be a tool to better understand our bodies, track natural cycles, control fertility and also learn about cultural and familial traditions around menstruation. In this gathering we will talk about the importance of cultural preservation and menstrual education in reproductive justice, and sharing knowledge and experiences around holistic menstrual care.

Speakers (click to view): La Loba Loca

Blood, Memories and other Brujerias: The Role of Cultural Preservation and Menstrual Education in Reproductive Justice

Speakers

La Loba Loca

La Loba Loca is a Queer sudaca, radical health educator, seed-saver, yerbetera, gardener, companion (doula), student-midwife, molestosa, malhablada, tatooadora, and choliperri. She is invested in learning and disseminating information, knowledge and resources with the hope that self-knowledge and (re)cognition of abuelita knowledge will create a future where we can depend on ourselves and communities. Connect with her at lalobaloca.com, on Instagram @lalobalocashares, and on facebook.com/lalobaloca.

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Embodied Intersections: A Disability Justice Journey
How do we embody our own struggles for justice? Where do our identities end, and our work begins? Join activist and core Disability Justice Collective member Gykyira Shoy as she introduces a disability justice framework through her own story as a trans woman with a disability. Participants will be introduced to a multi-issue disability justice platform and have a chance to pose questions.
Speakers (click to view): Gykyira Shoy

Embodied Intersections: A Disability Justice Journey

Speakers

Gykyira Shoy

Gykyira is 32 year old transwoman who has been fighting as an activist for 17 years. She graduated at the top of her class from Trans Justice Community School and is a core member of the Disability Justice Collective. She is the president and CEO of Trans Liberation United.

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Empowerment through Direct Care: Organizing to Provide Abortions and Support Across the Spectrum of Pregnancy
Join members of the Doula Project and the Jane Collective to share stories about organizing and creating community; learning to provide abortions and doula support during pregnancy, miscarriages and abortions; and political work that upholds individual experiences and the need for respectful and compassionate healthcare for all.
Speakers (click to view): Lani Blechman, Laura Kaplan, Lauren Mitchell, Mary Mahoney

Empowerment through Direct Care: Organizing to Provide Abortions and Support Across the Spectrum of Pregnancy

Speakers

Lani Blechman

Lani Blechman is currently a Western Massachusetts elementary school librarian and social justice facilitator, commonly focusing on white privilege and gender diversity. Often, her worlds collide. Lani is formerly a CLPP conference coordinator and always excited to come home.

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Laura Kaplan

Laura Kaplan is the author of The Story of Jane: The Legendary Underground Feminist Abortion Service and was a member of Jane. A lifelong activist, she was a lay midwife, an advocate for battered women and an advocate for nursing home residents. She has worked on public policy for consumers covered by managed care plans and served on the board of NWHN.

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Lauren Mitchell

Lauren Mitchell is one of the founders of The Doula Project, and part of the leadership team of Trans Buddy. She is also co-author of the upcoming book, The Doulas!: Radical Care for Pregnant People. It is her honor to have served over a thousand clients and have trained hundreds of activists, students, and clinicians over the past ten years.

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Mary Mahoney

Mary Mahoney, LMSW, is the Founder and Board Co-Chair of The Doula Project. She is co-author of THE DOULAS! Radical Care for Pregnant People, forthcoming Fall 2016 from The Feminist Press.

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Environmental Justice 101
This interactive workshop will allow participants to explore the intersections between environmental, climate, gender, and racial justice. Presenters will highlight cross-movement work, and innovative efforts that advance just solutions to environmental problems in the U.S. and internationally.
Speakers (click to view): Gusty Catherin, Daphne Chang

Environmental Justice 101

Speakers

Gusty Catherin

Gusty Catherin is a second year division two Hampshire college student. She is studying biology and public health through an environmental lens. Gusty has worked with CLPP, Climate Justice League, and Climate Action Now in the past.

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Daphne Chang

Daphne Chang cares deeply about social justice that is intersectional and inclusive of all identities and life experiences. She organized for Mount Holyoke's Divestment from Fossil Fuels campaign and has been involved in environmental justice activism. She is developing her politics by educating herself on gender, racial, disability, sexuality, economic, reproductive, and immigrant justice.

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Fighting for Reproductive Justice in Prisons
Focusing on the lived experiences of women and/or transgender people in prisons and jails, this session will expand participants' understanding of how sexism, racism and classism and gender-based violence are integral parts of these systems. Speakers will discuss innovative organizing models that ensure participation at the leadership level by incarcerated people and will focus on work happening around the country now, including campaigns to ban shackling during pregnancy, organizing to stop the building of new jails, and creating community-based wellness alternatives. Other forms of reproductive rights violations that occur while an individual is incarcerated such as forced sterilization, denial of health care, and threats to parental rights, will be brought to light.
Speakers (click to view): Rev. Jason Lydon, Marianne Bullock, Misty Rojo, Rachel Roth

Fighting for Reproductive Justice in Prisons

Speakers

Rev. Jason Lydon

Rev. Jason M. Lydon is a Unitarian Universalist community minister and the National Director of Black and Pink, an open family of LGBTQ prisoners and 'free world' allies who support each other.

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Marianne Bullock

Marianne Bullock is one of the founders and Directors of The Prison Birth Project. She is an organizer and full spectrum doula.

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Misty Rojo

Misty Rojo is part of a collective leadership structure at Justice Now, where she is the first co-director that has lived experience with incarceration. In the 3 years that Misty has come on board, she worked to helped the push to get SB 1135 passed to protect against coercive sterilizations in California women's prisons in 2014. In 2015, after 3 years of campaigning, she got a bill passed to expand access to an alternative custody program. Misty is a hardcore abolitionist believing all aspects of the criminal justice system and PIC need to be dismantled.

Groups audience: 

Rachel Roth

Rachel Roth is passionate about advancing reproductive justice and reducing imprisonment through research, policy analysis, and advocacy, partnering with the Prison Birth Project, Pretrial Working Group, and others. She is the author of the book Making Women Pay: The Hidden Costs of Fetal Rights and articles about abortion access, (un)safe childbirth, sterilization abuse, and shackling in prison. She blogs for MomsRising and lives near Boston.

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Genitals Roadshow: BYOJ (Bring Your Own Junk)

This inclusive, fun, and interactive workshop aims to help people feel empowered and in control of their healthcare. Participants will learn and practice techniques for providing a comprehensive self-chest exam assessing either their own chest tissue or a Mammacare model. We will also review the techniques of self-pelvic exams — one of the presenters, a gynecological teaching associate, will use their body to explain the pelvic exam and will demonstrate correct speculum placement and invite participants to view their cervix. All participants will walk away with a plastic speculum and tips on how to troubleshoot using it at home. We will also review penile, testicular, and hernia exams. We ask that all participants who will view the pelvic exam demonstration be at least 18 years of age, but welcome participants of all ages to the overview portion of the workshop.

Speakers (click to view): Alexandra Duncan, Tiffany Cook

Genitals Roadshow: BYOJ (Bring Your Own Junk)

Speakers

Alexandra Duncan

Alexandra Duncan’s life is driven by the belief that knowledge and authority over a person’s body belongs to them. She gave her kindergarten class ‘the talk’; studied medical anthropology; and was an EMT, yoga teacher, full-spectrum doula, and gynecological teaching associate. She founded Praxis Clinical to provide universities, hospitals, and communities with clinical skills and health literacy workshops built around justice, access, and patient empowerment.

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Tiffany Cook

Tiffany E. Cook’s reproductive justice framework comes from a hodgepodge of experience in health care, medical and sex education, abortion funding, and full spectrum doula care. She currently lives in Brooklyn and is the Training and Professional Development Coordinator for Diversity Affairs at NYU School of Medicine. When she’s not passionately advocating for social justice might find her cake decorating, gaming or posting on social media.

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Gynoticians & the Fourth Estate: Debunking Media Myths & Anti-Choice Lies in the 2016 Presidential Election Cycle

According to the Guttmacher Institute, more than 282 anti-choice restrictions have been enacted since 2010, including many based on junk science and outright lies. Misinformation about abortion is running rampant as conservatives and their media allies gear up for the 2016 elections. With many candidates touting their anti-choice track records to appeal to an increasingly extreme base, it's more important than ever that those organizing working to protect access to a full range of reproductive health services are armed with the facts, messaging, and strategy to combat this misinformation in the media and in the field. This workshop will provide attendees with the skills to identify and pushback on this misinformation when they encounter it in the context of the breakneck pace of an election media news cycle.

Speakers (click to view): Pamela Merritt, Rachel Tardiff, Andrea L. Alford

Gynoticians & the Fourth Estate: Debunking Media Myths & Anti-Choice Lies in the 2016 Presidential Election Cycle

Speakers

Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

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Rachel Tardiff

Rachel Tardiff is the Deputy Outreach Director at Media Matters for America. A graduate of American University, Rachel worked to help pass California’s Domestic Workers Bill of Rights and the state’s recent landmark equal pay legislation, and brought the stories of military rape survivors to Capitol Hill to push for unprecedented military policy change on the issue.

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Andrea L. Alford

Andrea L. Alford is the former Director of Media Relations at FitzGibbon Media. Before joining FitzGibbon Media, Andrea was a media strategist at the ACLU where she worked on a variety of issues, including racial profiling, voting rights, and immigration. She also developed and implemented strategic communications plans to amplify and promote federal and state legislative initiatives for lobbyists and affiliates. Prior to the ACLU, she worked in the communications departments at the National Abortion Federation, NAACP, PowerPAC, and The U.S. House of Representatives. Based in D.C., Andrea grew up in Alexandria, Virginia and an American University alumna, where she received a degree in print journalism and history.

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HIV Criminalization as a Reproductive Justice Issue: Dispatches from the South

There are presently 32 states that have laws that punish people for exposing another person to HIV, even in the absence of actual transmission. Research shows that rather than preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS, laws that criminalize HIV/AIDS status stigmatize people living with HIV/AIDS, and, in some cases, actively discourage people from getting tested and knowing their status. Presenters will share their own experiences as HIV-positive advocates on the front lines of fighting HIV criminalization laws in the South. They will engage participants in strategizing to fight these and other laws that target folks based on the condition of their bodies.

Speakers (click to view): Dana Asbury, Renae Taylor

HIV Criminalization as a Reproductive Justice Issue: Dispatches from the South

Speakers

Dana Asbury

Dana Asbury has family in many places. She lives in Memphis, TN with her partner, puppies, cat, and amongst a beautiful community of freedom fighters.

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Renae Taylor

Renae Taylor is a community organizer and activist working for trans communities, communities impacted by HIV/AIDS, and Black liberation.

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Radical Lawyering and Struggles for Justice

What tensions arise for lawyers who are providing advocacy and legal services, while at the same time seeking to transform systems — and end state violence? The presenters, who are activists and lawyers, will share their experiences, discuss why they have chosen to pursue advocacy work as lawyers and how they are now using the law to advance systemic change, and encourage participants to think about what becoming a radical lawyer would mean for them.

Speakers (click to view): Farah Diaz-Tello, nia weeks, Christa Douaihy, Esq., Lill Hewko

Radical Lawyering and Struggles for Justice

Speakers

Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah Diaz-Tello, JD, is a Senior Staff Attorney at National Advocates for Pregnant Women (NAPW). Her work focuses on the rights to medical decision-making and birthing with dignity, and on using the international human rights framework to protect the humanity of pregnant women regardless of their circumstances. A proud Texan, she is an alumna of UT Austin & the CUNY Law School.

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nia weeks

Nia Weeks is a native of New Orleans, Louisiana. After completing her secondary education at Ursuline Academy, she received her bachelor’s degree in Communications with a minor in Women's studies at Indiana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana. After completing her undergraduate education, Ms Weeks embarked on a career doing public relations for a non profit organizations in Gainesville, Florida. Ms. Weeks began her legal career at Florida Coastal School of Law in Jacksonville, Florida in 2007 and transferred to Loyola School of Law New Orleans in 2009. After passing the Louisiana Bar, Ms. Weeks served as a law clerk and was the director of a supervised visitation center for victims of domestics violence named Harmony House. She now is at Women with a Vision as the Director of Policy and Advocacy after serving as a public defender in Orleans Parish for 2 years.

Groups audience: 

Christa Douaihy, Esq.

Christa Douaihy, Esq is a supervising attorney in the Civil Action Practice and leader of one of the interdisciplinary teams at The Bronx Defenders. She provides advocacy and direct representation to Bronx residents who are fighting life-altering civil consequences of police contact and court involvement.

Groups audience: 

Lill Hewko

Lillian Hewko is an attorney at the Incarcerated Parents Project in Seattle, WA. They use the reproductive justice framework to bring incarcerated and formerly incarcerated individuals together to advocate for systemic change. A graduate of the University of Washington School of Law, Lillian identifies as a queer mixed-Latinx from a working-class background. Lillian is a board member of Surge, a reproductive justice collaborative.

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Remembering the Voice of the Body in our Organizing Work
An opportunity for people, no matter their physical ability, to explore how using an embodied approach to connection can deepen our capacity to learn, grow, and thrive. We will use active listening, play, rhythm, movement inquiry, and collaborative practice to tune into the innate intelligence of the body, allowing its voice to inform our decision making within the workshop. We will then reflect on how these skills can translate into our lives as activists, leaders, teachers, students, and community members.
Speakers (click to view): Jamila Jackson, Rikkia Pereira

Remembering the Voice of the Body in our Organizing Work

Speakers

Jamila Jackson

Jamila Jackson is a dancer and the co - facilitator of The (So)ul Connected Project. The project uses movement as a way to build community, develop leadership skills, provide college access, and access our inner healing and creative resources.

Groups audience: 

Rikkia Pereira

Rikkia Pereira is a third year dance concentrator at Hampshire College. She is currently doing research based in leadership and emotional theory that explores how dance can be used to navigate the body in community.

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Reproductive Justice Roundtable
A conversation among leaders in the field, about the evolution and current state of the reproductive justice movement, their own trajectories in the movement, how the reproductive justice framework has advanced their advocacy, and the challenges facing reproductive justice activists and advocates today.
Speakers (click to view): Coya White Hat-Artichoker, Paulina Helm-Hernandez, Cherisse Scott, Marlene Gerber Fried, Monica Raye Simpson

Reproductive Justice Roundtable

Speakers

Coya White Hat-Artichoker

Coya was born and raised on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota; she is a proud enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Coya has been doing activist work in various communities and movements since the age of 15

Groups audience: 

Paulina Helm-Hernandez

Paulina Helm-Hernandez is a queer femme cha-cha girl, artist, trainer, political organizer, strategist & trouble-maker-at-large from Veracrúz, México. This Chicana grew up in rural North Carolina, and is currently growing roots in Atlanta, GA. She has been the Co-Director of Southerners on New Ground (SONG) for 9 years.

Groups audience: 

Cherisse Scott

Cherisse Scott is the founder and CEO of SisterReach, Tennessee’s only reproductive justice organization. Under Ms. Scott’s leadership, SisterReach has released a 2015 report on the need for comprehensive sex ed for southern youth of color, rolled out their ProWoman Billboard campaign and presented to the United Nations Working Group on the Issue of Discrimination against Women in Law and Practice (UNWGDAW) on the impact of the fetal assault law on TN women.

Groups audience: 

Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a long time activist for abortion rights and reproductive justice. She is the professor and faculty director of CLPP, the founding president of the National Network of Abortion Funds (NNAF) and the Abortion Rights Fund of Western MA. Marlene is a co-author with Silliman, Ross and Gutierrez of Undivided Rights. She is a recipient of the 2015 NNAF Vanguard Award, the 2014 Felicia Stewart Advocacy Award (APHA), and the SisterSong Warrior Woman Award.

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Monica Raye Simpson

Monica Raye Simpson is the Executive Director of SisterSong, and has organized extensively against human rights violations, reproductive oppression, the prison industrial complex, and the systematic physical and emotional violence inflicted upon Black people with an emphasis on Black Southerners and LGBTQ people. She is also a singer, full circle Doula and was named a New Civil Rights Leader by Essence Magazine & a 40 under 40 leader by the Advocate.

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Sex Work and Reproductive Justice
People in the sex trade face unique barriers when accessing healthcare, housing, and freedom from incarceration. Reproductive oppression is institutionalized for people engaged in (or perceived to be engaged in) sex work, from Stop and Frisk and Crimes Against Nature laws to efforts to restrict access to social or health services based on current or former sex work. Join activists working to challenge and re-frame narratives around sex work and address the healthcare inaccess, criminalization, and aggressive policies targeting some of the most marginalized people in our communities.
Speakers (click to view): Nakita Shavers, Sienna Baskin, Zil Goldstein

Sex Work and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Nakita Shavers

Nakita Shavers is a native of New Orleans and has a long history of community advocacy and education. She is the Sexual Reproductive Health Coordinator at Women With A Vision, LLC. She is also the founder and executive director of the Dinerral Shavers Educational Fund (DSEF), and co-founder of Silence Is Violence Anti-Violence Organization.

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Sienna Baskin

Sienna Baskin is Managing Director of the Sex Workers Project (SWP). The Sex Workers Project provides client-centered legal and social services to individuals who engage in sex work, regardless of whether they do so by choice, circumstance, or coercion, while engaging in policy advocacy to protect their rights.

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Transforming Masculinity: Is It Possible?

When looking at the impacts of misogyny and sexism it is clear that there are many layers to unpack. How do we begin to heal from the daily effects of patriarchy? What does healing even look like when things like street harassment are normalized? This session will host breakout caucuses for people of color and for white people to have safer spaces to unpack and examine the strategies we use for challenging and healing from the trauma of gender-based violence.

Speakers (click to view): Lucia Leandro Gimeno, Sean Saifa Wall

Transforming Masculinity: Is It Possible?

Speakers

Lucia Leandro Gimeno

Lucia Leandro Gimeno is an Afro-Latinx, trans masculine femme bruja/organizer based in Atlanta, GA. A graduate of Columbia University’s School of Social Work, LL lived in New York City for 15 years organizing with queer and trans people of color communities. A current member of Black Lives Matter – Atlanta chapter, LL is also a future full-spectrum birthworker doing capacity building with The Queer & Trans People of Color Birthwerq Project to help mend the disconnect between trans justice and reproductive justice.

Groups audience: 

Sean Saifa Wall

Sean Saifa Wall is an intersex artist and activist whose goal is to create a world that is safe for Black bodies and intersex bodies to exist in. You can connect with him on social media or through his website, saifaemerges.com.

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Working Against the Grain: How Low-Income People & Migrants are Creating Space to Access Healthcare / Trabajando contracorriente: Migrantes y mujeres de bajos recursos crean espacios para tener acceso al cuidado médico

Of the six million people who are unable to access the Affordable Care Act, low-income people of color and migrant LGBTQ people are among the most impacted. From states whose governors have refused to expand Medicaid to the exclusion of people based on immigration status, there remain huge gaps in healthcare access across the country. Have you thought about alternative access so that people can remain healthy despite lack of health insurance? Are you working to, or wanting to work to expand Medicaid in your state? Come learn about a toolkit that can be used to organize around Medicaid expansion. Presenters will also share a model used in Arizona that is small, but mighty - ensuring coverage for LGBTQ migrants - and organizing with them! We will strategize on how to build and use tools that help activate communities of color, including migrant LGBTQ people.

De las seis millones de personas que se les hace imposible tener acceso a la Ley de Cuidado de Salud a Bajo Precio, entre lxs* más impactadxs son mujeres de color y migrantes lesbianas, gay, bisexual, transgénero y queer (LGBTQ) de recursos bajos. Aún quedan bastantes brechas en acceso al cuidado de salud en todo el país ya sea desde los estados en los cuales los gobernadores se han negado a expandir Medicaid, hasta la exclusión de personas basadas en su estado migratorio. ¿Has pensando en algún tipo de acceso alternativo para que las personas estén saludables a pesar de no tener seguro médico? ¿Estás trabajando o quieres trabajar para expandir Medicaid en tu estado? Ven a aprender acerca de herramientas para organizar alrededor de la expansión de Medicaid. Presentadoras también compartirán un modelo que están usando en Arizona que es pequeño, pero poderoso – asegurando la cobertura para migrantes LGBTQ ¡y organizando con elles*! Vamos a crear estrategias en cuanto a cómo crear y usar herramientas que puedan activar comunidades de color, incluyendo personas migrantes LGBTQ.
*lxs – en el español escrito, usamos la “x” para remplazar las terminaciones “o”, “a”, o “@” para palabras con género que hacen referencia a personas. Preferimos usar la “x” porque mostrar una resistencia al binario de género.
*elles – elles se usa como termino inclusivo de todos los géneros y para reconocer que hay personas que no se identifican con ningún género o con más de un género.

This session will be presented in Spanish with simultaneous interpretation into English. If you need English interpretation, please arrive early, as interpretation headsets are limited.

Speakers (click to view): Cecilia Sáenz Becerra, Dora Mejia, Karyna Jaramillo

Working Against the Grain: How Low-Income People & Migrants are Creating Space to Access Healthcare / Trabajando contracorriente: Migrantes y mujeres de bajos recursos crean espacios para tener acceso al cuidado médico

Speakers

Cecilia Sáenz Becerra

Cecilia is a bilingual immigrant, queer, Chicana, y desmadrosa! She has grassroots, community organizing, coalition building and management experience on various issues and campaigns, including labor rights, education, economic justice and immigration justice. Raised in PHX she now lives in ATL, providing support, strategy and technical assistance to front-line advocates and grassroots organizers across the country who exist along a varied spectrum of reproductive rights and reproductive justice politics.

Groups audience: 

Dora Mejia

Teodora Mejia Gaspar is a Mexican woman who has lived in Phoenix for 8 years. She is a grandmother and immigrant whose daughters receive DACA, a woman of faith, an activist, and program coordinator for Familias developing support, leadership, and family acceptance. She volunteers at AZ-QUIP/Arcoiris Liberation Team working for health of our communities.

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Karyna Jaramillo

Karyna Jaramillo is a transgender woman from Cuernavaca, México who emigrated to Phoenix, AZ in 1989 to pursue work. She has spent years living the realities of racism, homophobia, and discrimination in Phoenix from society and from the police. She has been detained by ICE three times, and knows first hand how the government and those in power try to destroy the dreams of tod@s nosotr@s (all of us). Currently, Karyna coordinates Arcoiris Liberation Team/Arizona Queer Undocumented Immigrants Project (AZ QUIP), a project defending LGBTI migrant communities. She works with her community both outside and inside detention centers to fight for the rights and liberty of her community, and more broadly for the autonomy and power de cada un@ de nosotr@s (of each of us).

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Youth Warriors: A Strategic Action Session for Youth Activism in Reproductive Justice
Young people have the power to make change in our communities right now! Come celebrate, learn, connect, strategize, and strive for youth empowerment as we share our visions for a stronger youth-led reproductive justice movement. This workshop is an activities-based primer to how young women of color can and are effecting change in the RJ movement and working toward healing together.
Speakers (click to view): Sevonna Brown, Natasha Camille

Youth Warriors: A Strategic Action Session for Youth Activism in Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Natasha Camille

Natasha Camille is a Senior at Barnard College majoring in Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies with a Concentration in Race and Ethnicity. She is an ELLA Fellow with the Sadie Nash Leadership Project, through which she has created and implemented a social justice project at a Brooklyn high school for black girls to have transformative discussions about the body, sexuality, and violence.

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Sunday 9:00AM - 10:30AM

Adoption in the Time of Colonialism

Throughout history, the state removal of children from their families and communities has been used as a genocidal attack on native communities and communities of color, further advanced and fueled by missionary interests. Discussion in this workshop will be centered around adoption justice by examining this modern practice of adoption through the historical context of colonialism. Through storytelling and an intersectional analysis, panelists will open a conversation about the implications of the terrible origins of modern adoption practice and implementing a community justice approach to family creation within the intricacies of race, class, power and privilege, sovereignty, and self-determination.

Speakers (click to view): Yong Chan Miller, Coya White Hat-Artichoker

Adoption in the Time of Colonialism

Speakers

Yong Chan Miller

Yong Chan Miller lives in Oakland, CA, and is the executive director of Surge. She has worked in social justice movements for over 20 years primarily at the intersections of race, class, and gender.

Groups audience: 

Coya White Hat-Artichoker

Coya was born and raised on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota; she is a proud enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Coya has been doing activist work in various communities and movements since the age of 15

Groups audience: 

At the Intersection of Reproductive and Gender Justice

What are the intersections, and points of departure, between reproductive justice and gender justice? Join us as we share regional and state policy perspectives, as well as examples of programming and advocacy efforts that have defined the two as distinct, yet overlapping movements. We will discuss the role and rationale for the inclusion or exclusion of gender identity as a reproductive justice focus, as well as provide examples of successful coordination and collaboration with partners and communities to promote both gender justice and reproductive justice.

Speakers (click to view): cortez wright, Lexi J. White, Michelle Batchelor

At the Intersection of Reproductive and Gender Justice

Speakers

cortez wright

Cortez Wright is a Black Southern Non Binary Queer Femme feminist, digital organizer, writer, and communications professional with over 5 years of experience working at the intersection of racial justice, queer & trans liberation, and reproductive justice in Georgia and the South. Currently, they are the Digital Communications and Development Coordinator at SPARK Reproductive Justice NOW, where they lead SPARK's digital engagement, social media presence, and communications strategy.

Groups audience: 

Lexi J. White

A graduate from the University of Pennsylvania who currently lives in Philadelphia, Lexi is a health and wellness human rights advocate, community organizer, writer-poet, and social justice scholar-activist. She focuses on Reproductive Justice and Sexual and Reproductive Health and Policy, rooting her work in the experiences and liberation of Black Women, Women of Color, and LGBTQ People of Color.

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Michelle Batchelor

Michelle S. Batchelor, M.A. is the Deputy Director for In Our Own Voice: Black Women’s Reproductive Justice Agenda; developing, promoting and partnering with organizations to advance a strategic policy agenda supporting Black women’s reproductive health and justice. Michelle has a Master's Degree in Clinical Psychology and Bachelor’s Degree in Economics. Prior to IOOV she oversaw domestic and global programming at the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors. Michelle worked at the Chicago Department of Public Health, managing several programs across the STD/HIV/AIDS, Substance Abuse and Mental Health divisions.

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Careers in the Movement
Can you follow your passion for reproductive justice and create a career for yourself in the movement? Come hear how our panelists have found opportunities to pursue exciting and creative work advancing reproductive justice in research, movement building, the arts, reproductive health advocacy, and direct organizing.
Speakers (click to view): Justina Nicole Trim, Megan Smith, Melissa Madera, Constance C. Luo

Careers in the Movement

Speakers

Justina Nicole Trim

Justina Trim is a recent college graduate from Georgia State University with a degree in Sociology and a concentration in Race and Urban studies. She now holds the membership and program associate position at SisterSong: National Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective.

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Megan Smith

Megan Smith is an artist, activist, and social worker. She founded the Repeal Hyde Art Project in 2011 to raise awareness and create dialogue about abortion access and interconnected issues. Since then, she has created over 100 shareable graphics and facilitated 25 university-based Repeal Hyde Art Project installations. Megan has designed artwork and materials for organizations like Advocates for Youth, Backline, Ibis Reproductive Health, the National Network of Abortion Funds, National Advocates for Pregnant Women, and Provide. Megan is also the recipient of the 2015 Arts and Healing Network Award for Arts and Social Change.

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Melissa Madera

Melissa Madera, Ph.D., is a story-listener, story-sharer, multi-media historian, full-spectrum doula, and bilingual reproductive justice advocate. She is the founder and director of The Abortion Diary, a space for sharing and listening to personal abortion experiences. Currently, Melissa is also the Laura C. Harris fellow in the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at Denison University.

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Constance C. Luo

Constance organizes with immigrant families and youth to build power for at-risk communities, including undocumented people. Her members are leaders who fight for racial, gender and language justice. Constance is a proud member of the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum (NAPAWF) & alumni of the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center and Chicago Votes.

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Centering The Leadership of Trans Women of Color
How have reproductive health, rights, and justice movements failed trans women, and where are our opportunities for justice and healing? Why is trans women of color leadership vital to our movements? Presenters from the Deep South to the two coasts will highlight current organizing efforts centering the leadership of trans women of color on intersecting issues such as immigration, disability, policing, and healthcare access.
Speakers (click to view): Gykyira Shoy, Kiara St. James, Bamby Salcedo

Centering The Leadership of Trans Women of Color

Speakers

Gykyira Shoy

Gykyira is 32 year old transwoman who has been fighting as an activist for 17 years. She graduated at the top of her class from Trans Justice Community School and is a core member of the Disability Justice Collective. She is the president and CEO of Trans Liberation United.

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Kiara St. James

Kiara St. James is Community organizer who believes that in order to have sustainable change, it goes deeper than just changing policies -- it starts with healing communities.

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Bamby Salcedo

Bamby Salcedo is the HIV Prevention Services Project Coordinator with Childrens Hospital Los Angeles. Bamby is the founder and President of The Trans-Latin@ Coalition. Ms Salcedo is a proud Latina transgender woman who is recognized nationwide for her advocacy work related to trans issues; Bamby is also working with The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) developing a blue print on how to provide health care services for trans people in Latin America and The Caribbean.

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- Private group -
Eating Your (Field) Wheaties!

Regardless of the issue you are organizing on, the need to educate and mobilize the larger public is a critical lever to create and sustain social change. Focusing on the science of field movement building, this session will review best practices ranging from door/phone canvass training to implementation and tracking, as tested by NARAL Pro-Choice America over the years. Participants will learn how to organize a robust field campaign on a shoe-string or near non-existent budget. A special portion of the training will be dedicated to how to start up a financial (money ask) door canvass in your communities.

Speakers (click to view): Gabby Weiss

Eating Your (Field) Wheaties!

Speakers

Gabby Weiss

Gabby Weiss is a field organizer for NARAL Pro-Choice America, where she is passionate about knocking on doors and surprising folks with conversations about abortion and reproductive freedom. She loves chihuahuas, New Mexican food and long conversations about race and gender representation in pop culture.

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Eugenics and Population Control
The right to choose not to have children is only a part of the fight for reproductive freedom. The state has an ongoing history of policing communities of color by denying access to reproductive services, forced sterilizations, and controlling family formation through social services and legislation of those deemed by the state as “unfit to parent.” Panelists will analyze state intervention through a historical and medical lens; the targeting of women of color, incarcerated women, and disabled people; and the politicized messaging around immigration as a scare tactic for population control. Participants will walk away with a deeper understanding of the right to birth and parent as an integral component of reproductive justice.
Speakers (click to view): Anne Hendrixson, Shana M. griffin, Cara Page

Eugenics and Population Control

Speakers

Anne Hendrixson

Anne Hendrixson is the Director of the Population and Development Program (PopDev) at Hampshire College.

Groups audience: 

Shana M. griffin

Shana griffin is a black feminist, mother, applied sociologist, activist, and artist based in New Orleans. Her work explores critical issues at the intersection of race and gender-based violence; housing rights and affordability; sexual health and reproductive autonomy; carceral violence and criminalizing policies; climate justice and sustainable ecologies; gender and disaster; reproductive violence and population control; and art and reimagination. Rooted in radical black feminist thought and organizing traditions, Shana’s research and activism challenges policies, practices, and behaviors that restrict, exploit, and regulate the bodies and lives of low-income and working class black women most vulnerable to the violence of poverty, carcerality, polluting environments, reproductive legislation, economic exploitation, and housing discrimination

Groups audience: 

Cara Page

Cara Page is a Black queer feminist cultural worker & organizer. She is the current Executive Director of the Audre Lorde Project, an Organizing Center in NYC for Lesbian, Gay, Bi, Two Spirit, Trans & Gender Non-Conforming People of Color. For the past 20+ years she has worked within the LGBTSTGNQ liberation movement, and the reproductive, racial and economic justice movements.

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Fish Fry!: Hot Topics in Reproductive Justice and Organizing in the South

Southerners deserve to own our narrative! This space serves as a living anthology of our work and progress in the South. Using a fishbowl style interactive discussion, participants will address specific issues in organizing such as funding, policies, and media representation. Participants will be given the opportunity to pose their own questions and brainstorm around continuing these conversations together back home. It is encouraged that those closely connected to reproductive justice work in the South step in to the fishbowl and share their experiences. This session will honor organizers and their work in the South and foster long-term, co-operative relationship building.

Speakers (click to view): Oriaku Njoku, Selena P Adetunji

Fish Fry!: Hot Topics in Reproductive Justice and Organizing in the South

Speakers

Oriaku Njoku

Oriaku Njoku, Co-Founder and Executive Director of Access Reproductive Care - Southeast, works at the intersection of meaningful abortion access, queer liberation and reproductive justice. Currently, she ensures funding for families seeking abortion care and advocates for individuals and their chosen families in the Southeast. As a big advocate of self-care, Oriaku uses her time off with the love of her life, her ragamuffin dogs, and cupcakes. Connect with her @oreawku on twitter - all views her own.

Groups audience: 

Selena P Adetunji

Selena Adetunji has been working in RH/RJ since 2002. She has worked in a variety of roles within health education, advocacy, direct service, and research. Raised in NC, she has recently relocated from San Francisco to Atlanta to continue to working in reproductive justice as Lab Director at Summit Medical Associates and Co-Founder and Assistant Director of ARC Southeast.

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Immigration Policy and Reproductive Justice: An Intersectional Dialogue

How is reproductive justice impacted by immigration policy? Communities of color, particularly women, children, and/or those identifying as LGBTQ, face inequitable access to reproductive health, freedom, and justice. Using participatory storytelling and small group work, attendees will explore intersections between immigration and reproductive justice. Presenters will highlight how recent developments in immigration policies impact marginalized communities' ability to access abortion care and other necessary reproductive health services.

Speakers (click to view): Madeline M. Gomez, Nimra J. Chowdhry

Immigration Policy and Reproductive Justice: An Intersectional Dialogue

Speakers

Madeline M. Gomez

Madeline M. Gomez is the LSRJ Federal Policy Fellow at National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, where she works on a range of issues related to reproductive healthcare access, judicial monitoring, and state legislation. Her student note "Intersections at the Border: Immigration Enforcement, Reproductive Oppression, and the Policing of Latina Bodies in the Rio Grande Valley" was published in the Columbia Journal of Gender and Law. She received her J.D. from Columbia Law School in 2015 and holds a B.A. from New York University. She is originally from Texas.

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Nimra J. Chowdhry

Nimra Chowdhry is the Federal Law and Policy Reproductive Justice Fellow at the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum (NAPAWF). She holds a law degree and a master’s certificate in Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies from the University of Houston. Nimra earned her Bachelor’s degrees in Government and Women and Gender Studies from The University of Texas at Austin.

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Know the Right, Resist the Right, Fight for Your Rights

Today, we can feel the presence of the Religious Right in craft stores, textbooks, pharmacies, bakeries, and countless other realms of society and government. Recognizing that strong and effective advocacy and resistance necessitates an understanding of our opposition, including their strategy, structure, and messaging tactics, this workshop aims to inform organizers, activists, and academics alike. We will explore current trends on the Right including: the manipulation of religious freedom arguments, racialized attacks on abortion access, state-by-state legislative chip-away tactics, and direct threats and harassment experienced by abortion providers and their families.

Speakers (click to view): Sondra Dantzic, Sophia Dantzic, Cole Parke, Frederick Clarkson, Loretta J. Ross, Marlene Gerber Fried

Know the Right, Resist the Right, Fight for Your Rights

Speakers

Sondra Dantzic

As a physician and a Hampshire College Alum (F81), Sondra Dantzic is delighted to return to the campus for CLPP Conference this year to share her passions: safe & legal provision of abortion and family planning for all, integrative medicine, and motherhood.

Groups audience: 

Sophia Dantzic

As the daughter of an abortion provider and OB/GYN, Sophia Dantzic has always been interested in social justice. She's excited to attend this conference both to share her experiences and to learn more about CLPP and student activism.

Groups audience: 

Cole Parke

Cole Parke is the LGBTQ & Gender Justice Researcher at Political Research Associates, a social justice think tank based in Boston. Their research and activism focuses on exposing and challenging right-wing propagators of U.S. culture wars both here and abroad through the Know Your Neighbors campaign (www.kynship.org).

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Frederick Clarkson

Frederick Clarkson is Senior Fellow for Religious Liberty at Political Research Associates in Somerville, MA. He is an author and journalist who has been researching and writing about the religious and political Right since the Reagan administration. He is the author, most recently, of a report titled: When Exemption is the Rule: The Religious Freedom Strategy of The Christian Right.

Groups audience: 

Loretta J. Ross

Loretta J. Ross is a former National Coordinator of SisterSong, where she worked from 2005-2012. She helped create the theory of "Reproductive Justice" in 1994 and co-authored Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice in 2004.

Groups audience: 

Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a long time activist for abortion rights and reproductive justice. She is the professor and faculty director of CLPP, the founding president of the National Network of Abortion Funds (NNAF) and the Abortion Rights Fund of Western MA. Marlene is a co-author with Silliman, Ross and Gutierrez of Undivided Rights. She is a recipient of the 2015 NNAF Vanguard Award, the 2014 Felicia Stewart Advocacy Award (APHA), and the SisterSong Warrior Woman Award.

Groups audience: 

Mental Health and Families: No Road Maps Provided
As a society, we are sympathetic when physical illness upends a family. We send cards, cook meals, and generally express concern. But mental illness carries with it a big enough stigma that few families and individuals get the benefit of community support, let alone adequate help from schools or the health care system. The premise of this workshop is that the challenges of stigma, judgment, and self-blame require a shift in societal attitudes—more awareness of mental health issues and altered states and receptivity towards those who live with them. How can we build support networks for everyone struggling with their mental health and/or who experience altered or extreme states? This workshop will feature personal narratives (adults’ and children’s) from family members as well as clinicians. We will hold time for people to ask questions and to share their own perspectives.
Speakers (click to view): Jessica DeGroot, Shoshana Marchand, Tope Fadiran, Emily Spangler, Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser, Avital Norman Nathman

Mental Health and Families: No Road Maps Provided

Speakers

Tope Fadiran

Tope Fadiran is a writer and researcher whose work addresses the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in American culture. She is a research fellow with Political Research Associates, a progressive social justice think tank. Her work has been featured on TIME.com, The Guardian, Salon, Bitch Magazine, and other outlets.

Groups audience: 

Emily Spangler

Emily Spangler is a student activist in rural Illinois. She is passionate about mental health awareness, reproductive health, the LGBT+ community, and other social justice issues.

Groups audience: 

Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser

Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser is a Hampshire alum. Former CLPP staff, she organized the first years of this very conference. Now, she's a writer whose emphasis includes family issues.

Groups audience: 

Avital Norman Nathman

Avital Norman Nathman is a freelance writer and editor of The Good Mother Myth. Her work has appeared in the NY Times, CNN, The Daily Dot, Cosmopolitan, The Establishment and more. She is also a co-founder of COFFEE.

Groups audience: 

Model Minority Mutiny: Building AAPI Feminist Community for Action

In the Fall of 2014, Changelab's Soya Jung issued an imperative to Asian Americans committed to racial justice: ignite a model minority mutiny. Using her words as our inspiration, we invite you to caucus with fellow Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders to discuss our roles within racial justice work, reproductive justice movement building, and feminism as a whole. We're tired of our identities being used to support anti-black racism as well as the targeted xenophobic attacks on our own communities. No prior or longstanding knowledge of reproductive justice is necessary in this session, but you should bring a willingness to discuss the complexities of race, gender, sexuality, and intersectional activism. This session is a closed space for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders.

Speakers (click to view): Joy Messinger, Sadia Arshad

Model Minority Mutiny: Building AAPI Feminist Community for Action

Speakers

Joy Messinger

Joy Messinger is a passionate community advocate whose life and career is guided by a commitment to social and reproductive justice. Currently calling Chicago home, she has also lived and worked in Central North Carolina and Western New York. Joy is Third Wave Fund's Program Officer and also devotes time to local and national feminist, adoptee justice, Asian American, and LGBTQ community building.

Groups audience: 

Sadia Arshad

Sadia Arshad is a reproductive justice nerd working in health communications during the day and doing youth empowerment and community engagement work at night. She fell into this work by accident, but couldn't be happier.

Groups audience: 

Monument Quilt: Share Your Story, Stand with Survivors

The Monument Quilt is a collection of stories from survivors of rape and abuse. By utilizing a public art project, the quilt resists the popular and narrow narrative of how sexual violence occurs by telling many stories, not one. This workshop will provide the opportunity for people to make a quilt square and learn how to coordinate a session on their campus or in their community. Be part of creating space where people can be heard, engage in the lifelong process of healing and help to shift the conversation in order to shape forward thinking policies to work towards accountability, justice and long-term culture change.

Speakers (click to view): Morgan Meneses-Sheets

Monument Quilt: Share Your Story, Stand with Survivors

Speakers

Morgan Meneses-Sheets

Morgan Meneses-Sheets has more than 15 years of experience leading programs for a range of reproductive and social justice organizations. Currently, she is a consultant working with nonprofit advocacy groups to create effective communications and public affairs strategies to raise awareness and cultivate support for social, culture and policy change.

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So your friend is having an abortion. How can you help? A doula perspective.

Abortion doula or full spectrum doula collectives have begun forming across the U.S. Whether due to location, time or availability, you may not had the opportunity to be trained. We will discuss the role of doulas and the physical, emotional, informational, and spiritual support abortion doulas can offer in order to help build skills to provide non-medical support to people having abortions. This workshop won't be enough to prepare you for work shifts in a hospital or clinic, but it will help you feel better prepared to support the people in your life (1 in 3 cis women in the U.S.—surely that includes people you know!) who are having abortions.

Speakers (click to view): Amy Arrington, Brenda Hernandez, Emma O'Brien, Erin Bourgault

So your friend is having an abortion. How can you help? A doula perspective.

Speakers

Amy Arrington

Amy Arrington is a Boston native pursuing a career in nurse midwifery. She wants to be involved in work that shatters health disparities for people of color. Amy is a full spectrum doula who believes that all people experiencing abortion, birth, adoption or pregnancy loss should receive compassionate and informative care.

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Brenda Hernandez

Brenda Hernandez is a law school diversity professional and a feminist activist. She is a trained abortion doula through the Boston Doula Project, and she writes for her blog, BoricuaFeminist.com. She has a BA in Women’s Studies from Mount Holyoke College and a JD from Pace University School of Law. Connect with her @boricuafeminist.

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Emma O'Brien

Emma O'Brien was drawn to work as a full-spectrum doula and herbalist after her own experiences with chronic illness and our dehumanizing medical system. She has been involved with the Boston Doula Project since it's founding in January 2014. Emma loves being queer, spinning wool, mullein growing out of vertical stone walls, and the work folks are doing to make the world a better place.

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Erin Bourgault

Erin Bourgault is an abortion doula, birth doula, mindfulness practitioner and feminist activist. She believes in compassion, radical empathy and self-care. She has been a case manager at the East Boston Neighborhood Health Center for over four years and also supervises the AmeriCorps Care Navigation program at EBNHC. Erin has a BA from Bates College in Women and Gender Studies and Environmental Studies.

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State Violence and Criminalized Communities
State-sanctioned violence through increased incarceration, policing and police brutality, and surveillance has deliberately targeted communities of color, especially youth, people engaged in street economies, and LGBTQ communities. Join this panel of activists representing organizations from New Orleans to New York that have mobilized against criminalization and policing to explore the intersections of reproductive justice and state violence. Community-driven work discussed will include Stop and Frisk policies and #BlackLivesMatter organizing.
Speakers (click to view): Andrea Ritchie, nia weeks, Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa

State Violence and Criminalized Communities

Speakers

Andrea Ritchie

Andrea Ritchie is a Black lesbian attorney and organizer whose work has focused on profiling, policing and police violence, and criminalization of women and LGBTQ people of color over the past two and a half decades. She is a Senior Soros Justice Fellow, co-author of Say Her Name, A Roadmap for Change, Queer (In)Justice and Law Enforcement Violence Against Women and Transgender People of Color: An Organizer's Toolkit.

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nia weeks

Nia Weeks is a native of New Orleans, Louisiana. After completing her secondary education at Ursuline Academy, she received her bachelor’s degree in Communications with a minor in Women's studies at Indiana State University in Terre Haute, Indiana. After completing her undergraduate education, Ms Weeks embarked on a career doing public relations for a non profit organizations in Gainesville, Florida. Ms. Weeks began her legal career at Florida Coastal School of Law in Jacksonville, Florida in 2007 and transferred to Loyola School of Law New Orleans in 2009. After passing the Louisiana Bar, Ms. Weeks served as a law clerk and was the director of a supervised visitation center for victims of domestics violence named Harmony House. She now is at Women with a Vision as the Director of Policy and Advocacy after serving as a public defender in Orleans Parish for 2 years.

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Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa

Born in Kenya, Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa is a 24 year old Black, Immigrant, Queer, Womyn poet and organizer based in New Orleans, LA. She is Co-Chair of the New Orleans Chapter of the Black Youth Project 100 (BYP100), on the coordinating committee for the New Orleans Youth Open Mic (NOYOM), the Open Studio Afterschool Writing Program Coordinator for Big Class, a member of Team Slam New Orleans (Team SNO), an African Culture/Fashion Blogger with Noirlinians and a Reproductive Justice Advocate with Women With A Vision. You can view more of her work at www.FreeQuencySpeaks.com and www.Noirlinians.com.

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The Revolution Starts with Me!: Recipes, Remedies, Rituals, & Resources for Self Care

How can activists practice self care in a world where we're being pulled in multiple directions? How can community organizations, schools, and our communities support us in prioritizing self care? By using interactive activities, storytelling, and skill-sharing, this workshop will help activists recognize how burnout manifests in activism and grassroots organizing. Participants will develop a collective list of self care tools called "Recipes, Remedies, Rituals, and Resources" to incorporate routine self care, and will also receive "The Revolution Starts with Me!: Incorporating Self Care and Preventing Burnout," a self care zine with tools, exercises, and advice from the presenters.

Speakers (click to view): Adaku Utah, Nicole Clark

The Revolution Starts with Me!: Recipes, Remedies, Rituals, & Resources for Self Care

Speakers

Adaku Utah

Hailing from Nigeria, Adaku Utah is an award winning liberation educator and organizer, healer and performance ritual artist committed to healing and liberation within oppressed communities. For over ten years, her work has been centered in movements for radical social change, with a focus on gender, sexuality, race, youth, and healing justice. She is the founder and director of Harriet's Apothecary, a healing village led by Black Cis Women, Queer and Trans folks committed to living out Harriet Tubman's legacy of liberation in our tissues and our lineage. She is also the founder of BeatBox Botanicals, a local sliding-scale, love-centered, and community-inspired plant medicine and healing practice. Her greatest desire is to embody the sacredness and wholeness of love and support herself, humanity and our larger ecosystem in garnering and using our tools of love, healing, and liberation to fashion just and sustainable realities

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Nicole Clark

Nicole Clark lives in New York City as a licensed social worker, program designer and evaluator, reproductive justice activist, and owner of Nicole Clark Consulting. Grounded in the reproductive justice framework, Nicole leads evaluation projects for organizations, provides in-person and remote trainings/technical assistance on program and workshop design, facilitates workshops, and participates in speaking engagements related to reproductive justice and women and girls of color.

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Voting Rights and Suppression: An Election Year Run-Down
This year’s election cycle has highlighted the connection between voting rights and reproductive justice. From targeted regulations of abortion providers to anti-trans bathroom bills, voters shape legislation that governs the country for years to come. But what does it mean when a trans person is barred from voting because of the gender listed on an ID? Or when early voting periods are denied to a working mother trying to juggle three children and childcare? Presenters will discuss voter suppression and share strategies for challenging it, mobilizing voters across identities, and working successfully within a campaign to center the most marginalized voices.
Speakers (click to view): Ashley Nicole McCray, Nourbese Flint, Pamela Merritt, Reia Chapman

Voting Rights and Suppression: An Election Year Run-Down

Speakers

Ashley Nicole McCray

Ashley is a proud Oglala Lakota (Bad Face Band), Sicangu Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, & Absentee Shawnee (Horse(Deer) Clan - Healer division) woman. She is a single mother of 3, a graduate student at the University of Oklahoma where she founded Indigenize OU, and a community organizer fighting for restorative justice for indigenous peoples through decolonization and reindigenization. She was recognized by the White House as a 2015 WHO Champion of Change for Young Women Empowering Communities for her efforts toward diversity & inclusion on campus, the recipient of the Norman Human Rights Commission's 2015 Norman Human Rights Award for her efforts in indigenous justice, and a CoreAlign Speaking Race to Power fellow.

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Nourbese Flint

Nourbese Flint is a blerd with a background in reproductive justice, journalism, all things X-Men and Batman related, matte lipsticks, Bob's Burgers, and Star Trek. She is currently working at Black Women for Wellness where she directs policy, RJ programs, civic engagement graphics, and keeping markers and crayons organized.

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Pamela Merritt

Pamela Merritt is an activist and writer committed to empowering individuals and communities through reproductive justice. A proud Midwesterner, Merritt is dedicated to protecting and expanding access to the full spectrum of reproductive healthcare.

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Reia Chapman

Reia Chapman, Southern Organizer for SisterSong-The National Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective, is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, activist, organizer, trainer and consultant. Based in Charlotte, NC, Reia works within communities of color and across movements to reduce mental health stigma, advocating for and providing culturally appropriate treatment, and building southern synergy to increase collective awareness about Reproductive Justice to address intersectional oppression.

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