Text Size:

-A A +A

2014 Conference Workshops

Friday 4PM - 6PM

Crunk Feminism: Digital Activism for the Real World
Energetic, insightful and provocative, the Crunk Feminist Collective (CFC) aims to “create a space of support and camaraderie for hip-hop-generation feminists of color.” Their view of feminism is unapologetic and in your face, like crunk music. The digital community they’ve created is a space to discuss ideas and feminist goals, to fully express oneself, support one another and create fellowship between feminists. They champion the possibilities of online and digital feminisms. In this session, come join the CFC to hear about their work, and participate in a discussion on questions like: Is Beyonce a feminist? Can online activism make offline change? What does it mean to "get crunk" if you're a feminist? Can you be a feminist and love hip-hop and reality TV?
Speakers (click to view): Eesha Pandit, Susana Morris

Crunk Feminism: Digital Activism for the Real World

Speakers

Eesha Pandit

Eesha Pandit is a writer and reproductive justice activist. Her writing can be found here at The Crunk Feminist Collective, The Nation, Feministing, Salon, RH Reality Check, Feministe and In These Times. She has also appeared on numerous TV news outlets including CNN, HLN, and MSNBC. She most recently worked as Executive Director of Men Stopping Violence, a social change organization dedicated to ending men’s violence against women.

Susana Morris

Susana Morris is co-founder of the Crunk Feminist Collective and teaches African American literature at Auburn University. Her book, Close Kin and Distant Relatives: The Paradox of Respectability in Black Women’s Literature, was published earlier this year. Writing as Crunkadelic, she covers a range of topics such as politics, self-care, sizeism, and reality TV on the CFC blog.
Time:
Location:
FPH 106
Deconstructing the Good Mother Myth
What does it mean to be a mother? Why do we pressure women to be "good mothers?" How have ideals and stereotypes come together to define or limit "motherhood?" Has feminism helped or hindered our collective sense of these attributes? And, how has this definition distracted us from the actual issues facing families today? This workshop will examine a few mothers’ perspectives and elicit workshop participants’ ideas about how to begin to deconstruct myths "Good," "Bad" and otherwise about mothers—for the benefit of all parents.
Speakers (click to view): Avital Norman Nathman, Sarah Buttenwieser, Tope Fadiran Charlton, Natasha Vianna, Deborah Jiang-Stein

Deconstructing the Good Mother Myth

Speakers

Avital Norman Nathman

Avital Norman Nathman is a writer whose work has been featured in Bitch magazine, The New York Times, RH Reality Check and more. In addition to her blog, The Mamafesto, Norman Nathman helms the series, “The Femisphere,” for Ms. Magazine, and writes the feminist parenting column, “Mommie Dearest,” for The Frisky. Her first book, an anthology that tackles the Good Mother Myth, is forthcoming from Seal Press.

Sarah Buttenwieser

Sarah Werthan Buttenwieser is a writer, a Hampshire graduate and a community organizer. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, on Salon and RH Reality Check amongst others. She also has four children, preschool to high school. More on her work at standshadows.com

Tope Fadiran Charlton

Tope Fadiran Charlton is a writer and researcher whose work addresses the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in American culture. She is a research fellow with Political Research Associates, a progressive social justice think tank. Her work has appeared in The Guardian, Salon, Bitch Magazine, and other outlets.

Natasha Vianna

Natasha Vianna is a Boston-based Latina activist and online organizing aficionado. As a former teen mom, Natasha works with activists and organizations across the country to launch strategic messaging campaigns that dissect the realities of teen pregnancy while eliminating the unnecessary stigmatization of young families. Recently, she took the stage to share a TEDx talk on the culture of shaming young mothers for their reproductive rights.

Deborah Jiang-Stein

Deborah Jiang-Stein is a national speaker and founder of The unPrison Project (www.unprisonproject.org,) a 501(c)3 nonprofit working to empower incarcerated women and girls with life skills and mentoring to prepare for a successful life after prison. Born heroin-addicted to an incarcerated mother, Deborah is the author of the memoir, Prison Baby (Beacon Press): “one woman's struggles—beginning with her birth in prison—to find self-acceptance, proving that redemption and healing are possible, even from the darkest corners.
Time:
Location:
FPH 104
Leading the Fight to Live and Thrive Positive
Everyone has the right not only to the care and conditions of dignity needed to lead healthy lives, but also to thrive, and to be supported as whole, vital members of our communities. Come hear how HIV positive people and allies from diverse communities around the world are working together to fight for testing and prevention services, education and meaningful access to life-saving care, and to make those rights our shared reality.
Speakers (click to view): Dee Borrego, Dazon Dixon Diallo, Amy Britt, Anna Saeger

Leading the Fight to Live and Thrive Positive

Speakers

Dee Borrego

Dee is an activist, blogger, polyglot, and community leader for the trans* and HIV communities since 2005. A founding member of the Positive Women's Network USA (PWN USA) in 2008, she currently serves on their steering committee. Dee also serves on the boards for the HIV Prevention Justice Alliance (HIV PJA) and the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+).

Dazon Dixon Diallo

Dázon Dixon Diallo is a visionary advocate in the struggle for women’s human rights and reproductive justice, and the fight against HIV/AIDS on behalf of communities of women living with HIV and those at risk for HIV and STIs. Dr. Diallo is Founder and President of SisterLove, Inc, established in 1989, the first women’s HIV/AIDS and RJ organization in the southeastern United States.

Amy Britt

Amy Britt is the Outreach Manager at Tapestry Health, where she organizes community events to provide sexual health education and testing services in all four Western Massachusetts counties, with a focus on engaging youth on college campuses. In 2012, Amy was selected to travel to Brazil as an American Fellow in a U.S. State Department Program focused on Women’s Health Leadership.

Anna Saeger

A Hampshire College and CLPP alumna, Anna Saeger is an advocate and community health educator around issues of sexual health and wellness, HIV/AIDS, youth empowerment, and reproductive justice. Anna is currently an AIDS United AmeriCorps member working as an HIV Health Educator with the Erie Family Health Center of Chicago, IL. Through Erie’s Lending Hands for Life program, Anna provides prevention education, testing, medical and emotional support for people at risk or currently living with HIV/AIDS.
Time:
Location:
FPH West Lecture Hall
No Blurred Lines: Getting Clear Consent
Consent requires clear, constant communication. Practicing effective consent is a crucial part of having healthy and enjoyable sexual encounters - but can it be sexy? Yes it can! In this workshop we will explore consent: why it is crucial, what it looks like, and how to incorporate it in your life.
Speakers (click to view): Jill Grimaldi, Aviva Galpert, Sarah Kristy

No Blurred Lines: Getting Clear Consent

Speakers

Jill Grimaldi

Jill Grimaldi is the Instructional designer for the Center for Women & Community (formerly Everywoman's Center). She is responsible for co-coordinating the CWC's volunteer Educator Advocates in providing free workshops and events to educate the Hampshire County Community about sexual and relationship violence, as well as working with innovative online tools to spread the CWC's education through the web. Jill is also a volunteer for the Abortion Rights Fund of Western Massachusetts and a passionate advocate for the Reproductive Justice movement.

Aviva Galpert

Aviva is a third-year student at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where she studies Social Thought and Political Economy. This is her second semester as an Educator/Advocate at the Center for Women and Community.

Sarah Kristy

A University of Massachusetts senior Psychology major and Women Gender Sexuality Studies and Education minors. She has been an educator advocate of the Center of Women an Community for two years.
Time:
Location:
ASH 112
Reproductive Justice 101
Heard the term reproductive justice thrown around a lot? Not really sure what it means or where it comes from? As a framework that many social justice organizations and activists base their work on, it’s important for us to understand what it is we are talking about. Join us to have some of those questions answered and engage in a dialogue on the history, meaning, and application of reproductive justice in our work toward achieving reproductive freedom. Hear from facilitators working on reproductive justice in a number of capacities and figure out what it means for you!
Speakers (click to view): Jazmyn Price

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers

Jazmyn Price

Jazmyn is a student at Mount Holyoke College. Her interest include feminist health care, reproductive technologies, and midwifery. She is student co-chair on for CLPP's outreach committee and enjoys tweeting, eating, and Mad Men.
Time:
Location:
MDB Recital Hall
Resisting the Right
The Christian Right in the U.S. is a dominant force in attacking human and civil rights in this country and internationally. As it reaches middle age, the new Christian Right is undergoing significant changes that will profoundly affect the terrain of social justice struggles in the coming years and decades. Based on their experiences as researchers and activists, panelists will discuss the primary sectors of today's Religious Right, the inroads the right is making in the African American community on abortion and the resistance to them, and highlight how activists in Springfield Massachusetts are addressing the roots of exporting homophobia to Uganada.
Speakers (click to view): Marlene Gerber Fried, Loretta J. Ross, Frederick Clarkson, Rachel V. Tabachnick

Resisting the Right

Speakers

Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a longtime activist and scholar, the CLPP Faculty Director and founding president and board member of the National Network of Abortion Funds. Currently she is a visiting fellow in the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and working on an international abortion advocacy project with Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights. She is a co-author of Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice.

Loretta J. Ross

Loretta J. Ross was a co-founder and the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012. Ms. Ross is an expert on women’s issues, racism and intolerance, human rights, and violence against women and speaks at many colleges and universities.

Frederick Clarkson

Frederick Clarkson is Senior Fellow at Political Research Associates in Somerville, MA. He is an author and journalist who has been researching and writing about the religious and political Right since the Reagan administration. His work has appeared in magazines and newspapers from Mother Jones, Church & State and Ms. magazines to The Christian Science Monitor and The Islamic Monthly. He is the author of Eternal Hostility: The Struggle Between Theocracy and Democracy and editor of Dispatches from the Religious Left: The Future of Faith and Politics in America.

Rachel V. Tabachnick

Rachel Tabachnick is an independent researcher, writer, and speaker and a fellow at Political Research Associates. Her focus is on conservative infrastructure, including the intersection of the political and Religious Right.
Time:
Location:
FPH Main Lecture Hall
Roundtable on Philanthropy and Social justice
How can we build a movement for social and economic justice that is inclusive of all of our communities? Join us to discuss how philanthropic advocacy can support and honor young leaders, build power in low-income and immigrant communities and communities of color, fight poverty, and leverage new resources and our collective power to advance gender justice for all people, regardless of income, as a human right.
Speakers (click to view): Coya White Hat-Artichoker, Ginger Hintz, Rye Young, Sara K. Gould, Tuti Scott

Roundtable on Philanthropy and Social justice

Speakers

Coya White Hat-Artichoker

Coya was born and raised on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota; she is a proud enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Coya has been doing activist work in various communities and movements since the age of 15. She is a member of the First Nations Two Spirit Collective, which is a collective working to building a stronger political presence for Two Spirit people within the national dialogue of queer rights.

Ginger Hintz

As the Program Manager at the Women Donors Network, Ginger Hintz supports the donor circles, whose goals are strategic social justice grantmaking. Ginger received a BA in Environmental Policy and an MA in American Culture Studies from BGSU. Ginger credits moving to Cleveland, OH where she was a pro-choice escort through rain, snow and shine, as the place where she cut her sharpest reproductive justice tooth.

Rye Young

Rye Young is Third Wave Fund's Director. He began his career as an abortion fund hotline intern at Third Wave Foundation (the organization that became Third Wave Fund). Rye served on staff of Third Wave for five years in various program roles, and dedicated himself to developing systems for impact measurement and grantmaking, while crafting programs that met the needs of Third Wave's grassroots, community-based organizations.

Sara K. Gould

Sara is the Activist-in-Residence at Smith College for the Spring, 2014 semester. She is the former president & CEO of the Ms. Foundation for Women, where she worked for 25 years. Most recently, she was the associate director of Caring Across Generations, a national campaign led by the National Domestic Workers Alliance and Jobs with Justice. Sara is on the boards of the National Immigration Law Center and the Proteus Fund.

Tuti Scott

As a “Spiritual Jock” and women’s sports advocate, Tuti brings the topics of self-care, teamwork, competition, and personal excellence to the women’s rights arena. Tuti has been a speaker and leader in women’s rights, social justice philanthropy and women’s sports for three decades and enjoys supporting activists and organizations in living their values and materializing their visions.
Time:
Location:
FPH Faculty Lounge
Say What? Talking About Our Pro Choice Values in a Media Savvy Way
When we get loud about reproductive justice, we win! In this workshop, NARAL Pro-Choice America and Young People For will share best practices in values based messaging and storytelling to help advance our causes in intersectional ways. Attendees will deconstruct real world scenarios and learn about grassroots organizers can tap into the power of storytelling to advance our agendas.
Speakers (click to view): Chagan Sanathu, K. Travis Ballie

Say What? Talking About Our Pro Choice Values in a Media Savvy Way

Speakers

Chagan Sanathu

Chagan Sanathu is the Alumni Program Coordinator with YP4. As a former Fellowship Associate and a 2010 YP4 Fellow, she has a long history of engagement with the YP4 Program. A recent graduate of Goshen College, where she graduated with a degree in Business and Public Relations, she has held numerous leadership positions, including serving as a Senate chair and the International Student Club leader at her school. Last summer, Chagan was selected to participate in the New Leaders Internship program with the Center for Progressive Leadership, where she developed skills to be a part of the progressive movement. Before joining staff, Chagan interned at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, researching the effects of child tax credit and earned income tax credit on low-income communities, especially on women who survived domestic violence. Most of her work and focus has been in women’s issues and raising awareness of domestic violence and sexually abused women in South Asian communities. She is also a Board member for National Asia Pacific American Women's Forum- DC Chapter, where she works on fundraising to continue to help the chapter work on immigration reform, reproductive justice and any other issues the API community faces.

K. Travis Ballie

Travis is the Manager of Affiliate & National Programs for NARAL Pro-Choice America. He is responsible for providing support for NARAL’s 22 affiliates, chapter, & choice action team. Travis also runs NARAL’s DC Volunteer Program, as well as the Choice Out Loud – On Campus millennial engagement program. He is a graduate of American University (’10) with a Double B.A. In International Relations & International Business.
Time:
Location:
JLC 120
State Violence and the Criminalization of our Communities
State-sanctioned violence through increased surveillance, police brutality, and “quality of life” legislation has very deliberately fallen on poor communities, communities of color, and LGBT communities - and most often those living at the intersection of all three. From young queer people of color organizing “Know Your Rights” trainings to advocating a nationwide drug policy that doesn’t reinforce the prison-industrial complex, activists are resisting the criminalization of their lives, bodies, and families from the grassroots on up.
Speakers (click to view): Deborah Peterson Small, Lindsay Rosenthal, Kylee Sunderlin, Sarah Launius

State Violence and the Criminalization of our Communities

Speakers

Deborah Peterson Small

Deborah Small, J.D./M.P.P. is the Executive Director of Break the Chains (BTC). The mission of BTC is to build the movement for alternatives to punitive drug policies that disproportionately impact poor of color. We envision a world where substance abuse is addressed as a public health problem with policies grounded in science, compassion and human rights.

Lindsay Rosenthal

As a fellow with the Ms. Foundation for Women, Lindsay Rosenthal's advocacy focuses on increasing access to health care for girls in state custody as a primary strategy for dismantling the abuse-to-prison pipeline. Her work is informed by experience in direct service with girls in the foster care and juvenile justice systems as well as national health policy research and advocacy at the Center for American Progress.

Kylee Sunderlin

As a 2013 Soros Justice Fellow, Ms. Sunderlin's work at National Advocates for Pregnant Women seeks to dispel misinformation and gross assumptions about medication-assisted treatment while challenging punitive, family-disruptive responses to it. Ms. Sunderlin is a graduate of the University of Michigan and Michigan Law School.

Sarah Launius

I am a PhD student in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona and co-founder of the Keep Tucson Together community-based immigration legal clinic. For the last decade I have worked with groups in southern Arizona on border and migrant justice issues.
Time:
Location:
FPH East Lecture Hall
Strategic Action Session: Cross-Movement Organizing in the South
How are southern organizers engaging with the various issues that are affecting their cities and communities? In recent months, we have seen the denial of civil rights through voter ID laws, anti-abortion legislation and harsh attacks on immigrant communities and poor families. What strategies are activists in the South using to connect their personal and political lives? Join us as we discuss ways to re-root the struggle for queer, trans, abortion, and immigrant rights in our southern communities.
Speakers (click to view): Ashe Helm-Hernandez, Jazmine Walker

Strategic Action Session: Cross-Movement Organizing in the South

Speakers

Ashe Helm-Hernandez

Ashe Helm-Hernandez is a member of Southerners On New Ground, (S.O.N.G.) & Alpha Psi Kappa Fraternity, Inc., the nation's largest nonprofit LGBT Greek organization specifically for dominant lesbians.

Jazmine Walker

Jazmine specializes in reproductive and agricultural economic justice in the South. Her dedication to public scholarship and activism is driven by a passion to amplify the importance of rural places and communities within US justice movements. You can find her blogging at Still Furious & Brave and in collaboration with Echoing Ida, a Strong Families project.
Time:
Location:
FPH 107
The Biology of Burnout
The effectiveness of reproductive justice work is directly related to our own spiritual, physical, emotional, and mental health. Participants will increase their ability to recognize the sources of stress in their own life and leave with tools that they can implement for sustainability in their social justice work. Long-term, system-wide changes will be addressed as well as individual strategies to ameliorate burnout in our day to day lives.
Speakers (click to view): April Nishimura, Christine Cruz Guiao

The Biology of Burnout

Speakers

April Nishimura

April Nishimura is lead organizer and co-founder of Zenyu Healing, which supports leadership development of Queer people of color and allies through local and national retreats and workshops. She is also a hands-on healer and Structural Medicine practitioner in Seattle, WA.

Christine Cruz Guiao

Christine Cruz Guiao, is a queer Filipina-American. A veteran of the social justice non-profit world, she has over 10 years experience as a Healer and Spiritual Guide as well as in organizing and leading wilderness retreats. She is the co-founder and Executive Director of Zenyu Healing, a unique organization dedicated to the spiritual health of LGBTQI People of Color.
Time:
Location:
FPH 101

Saturday Session 1: 1:15PM - 2:45PM

Access to Healthcare
Although the Affordable Care Act has removed certain legal roadblocks to care for LGBT folks, people living with HIV/AIDS, and poor folks, there are still barriers to overcome for these groups to access effective, competent, and safe(r) care. Our panel of researchers, providers, and activists will talk about their work, from providing reproductive health care to trans patients, to advocating for access in rural communities, to writing and reporting on health care policy at the national level. Participants will learn about the current state of health care reform and the impact it will have on marginalized communities, as well as brainstorm culturally competent and creative solutions to promote access.
Speakers (click to view): Erin Wilkins, Tiffany E. Cook, Kellan Baker, Sean Cahill

Access to Healthcare

Speakers

Erin Wilkins

Erin is a queer single mama and works at Family Tree Clinic, a sexual health clinic in St. Paul, MN.

Tiffany E. Cook

Feminism might be a dirty word in Idaho, but Tiffany’s college experience there reignited her passion for reproductive justice. Her current work includes sexual health counseling and education (CHA Family Planning), abortion counseling, volunteering with the EMA Fund, and starting a full-spectrum doula project in Boston (she’s trained as a birth and abortion doula). In her spare time, she rock climbs and decorates cakes!

Kellan Baker

Kellan is the Associate Director of the LGBT Research and Communications Project at the Center for American Progress, where his work focuses on working with the Department of Health and Human Services on a range of LGBT health issues. In addition to his federal policy work, Kellan directs the LGBT State Exchanges Project, which partners with LGBT and consumer health advocates in numerous states to ensure that the benefits of health reform reach LGBT communities.

Sean Cahill

Sean Cahill, Ph.D., is Director of Health Policy Research at the Fenway Institute in Boston. He teaches public policy at New York University, Northeastern, and Brandeis. Cahill serves on the Massachusetts Commission on LGBT Youth, the Massachusetts LGBT Elder Commission, and previously held leadership positions at NGLTF and Gay Men’s Health Crisis. Cahill is author of many books and articles on LGBT and HIV/AIDS issues.
Time:
Location:
FPH 101
After Tiller Screening
After Tiller intimately explores the highly controversial subject of third-trimester abortions in the wake of the 2009 assassination of practitioner Dr. George Tiller. The procedure is now openly performed by only four doctors in the United States, all former colleagues of Dr. Tiller, who risk their lives every day in the name of their unwavering commitment toward their patients. Directors Martha Shane and Lana Wilson have created a moving and unique look at one of the most incendiary topics of our time, and they’ve done so in an informative, thought-provoking, and compassionate way.
Speakers (click to view): Susan C. Robinson, M. D., Wendy Robinson, K. Travis Ballie

After Tiller Screening

Speakers

Susan C. Robinson, M. D.

Dr. Susan Robinson has specialized in abortion care since 2001. She was privileged to work with Dr. George Tiller in Wichita until his assassination in 2009 and is now doing all trimester abortion care with two other docs at Southwestern Women’s Options in Albuquerque, NM. Susan lives in California with her wonderful partner and enjoys being a thorn in the side of the anti-abortion fanatics.

Wendy Robinson

Wendy is Director of the all volunteer organization Voice of Choice (vochoice.org and Facebook.com/vochoice) which works to counter anti-choice extremists and hosts the "bullies" rogue gallery. She believes reproductive rights are central to women's autonomy, and that abortion and contraceptives should be safe, legal and accessible.

K. Travis Ballie

Travis is the Manager of Affiliate & National Programs for NARAL Pro-Choice America. He is responsible for providing support for NARAL’s 22 affiliates, chapter, & choice action team. Travis also runs NARAL’s DC Volunteer Program, as well as the Choice Out Loud – On Campus millennial engagement program. He is a graduate of American University (’10) with a Double B.A. In International Relations & International Business.
Time:
Location:
FPH Main Lecture Hall
Beyond the U.S.: Dispatches of Reproductive Justice from Around the World
Activists who work on reproductive justice internationally will share their diverse experiences and perspectives on abortion access in the Middle East and North Aftrica and Latin America, the global advocacy work of the Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights and efforts to link activism with the New Development Agenda, and HIV work in South Africa, a practical approach to addressing women's poverty and economic dependence.
Speakers (click to view): Lara Cousins, Cora Fernandez Anderson, Dazon Dixon Diallo

Beyond the U.S.: Dispatches of Reproductive Justice from Around the World

Speakers

Lara Cousins

WGNRR is a Southern-based, global network that builds and strengthens movements for sexual and reproductive health, rights (SRHR) and justice. As Advocacy Officer, Lara monitors international policy developments and debates and work to ensure the full inclusion of SRHR within the post-2015 Development Agenda. Lara has a cross-cultural, capacity-building background relating to HIV/AIDS, gender equity, and SRHR, with a focus on youth leadership and engagement.

Cora Fernandez Anderson

Cora Fernandez Anderson is a Five College Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Comparative Reproductive Politics. Her research focuses on human rights and women’s movements in Latin America. She is currently working on a project to explain the successes and failures of the campaigns for the decriminalization of abortion in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay.

Dazon Dixon Diallo

Dázon Dixon Diallo is a visionary advocate in the struggle for women’s human rights and reproductive justice, and the fight against HIV/AIDS on behalf of communities of women living with HIV and those at risk for HIV and STIs. Dr. Diallo is Founder and President of SisterLove, Inc, established in 1989, the first women’s HIV/AIDS and RJ organization in the southeastern United States.
Time:
Location:
FPH East Lecture Hall
Birth Justice
Why does birth matter to reproductive justice? This workshop will explore how control over our own birthing experiences has been part of the broader fight for reproductive rights and body sovereignty. Speakers will discuss the history of medicalized birth, racism's role in creating health disparities and moving birth out of the hands of midwives, and efforts to expand the doula and midwifery models of care, both in the US and in international contexts.
Speakers (click to view): Pamela Stone, Lauren Mitchell, Farah Diaz-Tello, Marianne Bullock

Birth Justice

Speakers

Pamela Stone

Dr. Stone works at the intersections of science and culture to understand how biology is negotiated by culture. Her particular focus has been around childbirth, and her goals are to illuminate patterns of morbidity and mortality in the context of childbirth through biological, cultural, and ethnographic data to understand the complex underpinnings of life stressors that are are exacerbated by pregnancy, but not necessarily caused by it.

Lauren Mitchell

Farah Diaz-Tello

Farah Diaz-Tello, JD, is a Staff Attorney at National Advocates for Pregnant Women. Her work has focused on birth justice and using the human rights framework to protect the dignity and humanity of pregnant and birthing people. She is a proud Texan and mama to three small boys.

Marianne Bullock

Marianne Bullock is a founder and Lead Doula with The Prison Birth Project. She is apprenticing to be a Certified Professional Midwife and is currently an Ada Comstock Scholar at Smith College studying motherhood, race and confinement. She has worked with MomsRising.org on economic justice and family policy issues at a state and national level.
Time:
Location:
ASH 111
Confronting Femmephobia and Building Femme Power
Join the Heels on Wheels Glitter Roadshow performers and create a space to examine, confront, and shift fear of femininity to celebrations of all genders and representation of femmes in your community!
Speakers (click to view): Damien Luxe, Heather Ács, Shomi Noise, Sabina Ibarrola, Angel Nafis

Confronting Femmephobia and Building Femme Power

Speakers

Damien Luxe

Damien Luxe a/k/a Hadassah D’Luxe, is a Brooklyn-based queer femme liberationist artist, lifelong writer, multi-media producer, community organizer and media justice activist who has been performing theatre and music at cabarets, festivals and literary events all over the continent since 2003 and producing digital communications for artists and activists since 2005.One of her art websites is axondluxe.com. Her blog is femmetech.org

Heather Ács

Heather M. Ács is a Brooklyn-based, multi-media theatre performance artist, activist, curator, educator and high-femme troublemaker. Her work has been featured in festivals, theatres, and galleries across the U.S., Canada, and Europe. Heather is the Co-Producer of the Heels on Wheels Glitter Roadshow, now in its fifth year. www.heatheracs.com

Shomi Noise

Shomi Noise is a producer, musician, organizing member of Heels on Wheels, and writer. A part-time drag queen and full time queer grrrl, she also currently sings and plays guitar in a queer grrrl punk band and is working on the 4th volume of her zine, which narrates some of her lived experiences based on the intersectionality of culture, race, class, sexuality and punk rock.

Sabina Ibarrola

Sabina is a performance artist and troublemaker. This mixed-race bruja finds the meat and magia of her work in the natural world and urban ecosystems of Brooklyn, New York. Inspired by a brilliant galaxy of queer femme artists and instigators, she explores themes of heartbreak, ancestry, chosen family, femininity, and faith. She has worked as an organizing member of Heels On Wheels since 2013. sabinaibarrola.com

Angel Nafis

Angel Nafis is an Ann Arbor, Michigan native and Cave Canem Fellow. In 2011, she represented the LouderArts poetry project at both the Women of the World Poetry Slam and the National Poetry Slam. She is an Urban Word NYC Mentor, creator of the quarterly Greenlight Bookstore Poetry Salon reading series, and author of BlackGirl Mansion (Red Beard Press/ New School Poetics, 2012). angelnafis.tumblr.com
Time:
Location:
MDB Recital Hall
Health Care Inside: Ensuring Women* Get the Care They Need in Custody
Incarceration can be one of the most disruptive and traumatizing experiences in one’s life - rippling outward from an individual to their family and community. As California’s prison system continues to expand, “realignment” has transferred many women from state prison to local jails which are ill-equipped to handle the complexity of reproductive health care issues women face. This strategic action session features advocates and organizers who have been researching, documenting, and brainstorming ways to improve health care inside. An advocate who helped end shackling in California and organizers who find solutions from the inside out will share their strategies and provide tools for your own local advocacy.
Speakers (click to view): Alicia M. Walters, Courtney Hooks, Misty Rojo, Theresa Martinez

Health Care Inside: Ensuring Women* Get the Care They Need in Custody

Speakers

Alicia M. Walters

Alicia Walters is a consultant through her company Creative Justice Works where she works with reproductive justice organizations in communications, policy advocacy, and movement building. With over ten years of experience in the field, Alicia has worked in classrooms, women’s shelters, correctional facilities, and non-profit institutions. As a consultant with the CoreAlign Initiative, Alicia is overseeing digital strategy and helping build a robust network of risk-taking individuals in the reproductive health, rights, and justice movement.

Courtney Hooks

Courtney directs Justice Now’s prison closure and anti-sterilization abuse campaigns. She helped start a syringe exchange program at HIPS, collaborated with imprisoned activists to create a Hepatitis C & HIV guide, and provided support to people experiencing birth, abortion, and miscarriage through The Doula Project. She co-coordinated the CLPP conference in the past, and is currently apprenticing to become a midwife and womens/trans/queer health nurse.

Misty Rojo

Misty Rojo is a survivor of both domestic and state abuse. She served 10 years in a California institution after leaving a violent relationship. While incarcerated she was mentored by some amazing women and taught the true meaning of self-determination and resilience. She was trained and encouraged by Justice Now of which she is a founding board member. With empowerment and love, she support Justice Now in many forms including media work and training the next generations of activists within Justice Now’s walls.

Theresa Martinez

Theresa Martinez is an accomplished human rights and social justice activist, organizer, advocate and a founding board member of Justice Now. While incarcerated for 23 years Theresa trained 219 people in human rights law. She established an underground network of human rights documenters that resisted the inhumane conditions of the prison system and exposed the eugenic practices utilized by the Department of Corrections to target women of color, including sterilization.
Time:
Location:
FPH Faculty Lounge
Our Voices and Our Bodies Matter: Connecting Youth 2 Youth
Young people have the power to make change in our communities right now! Now is the time to come together to elevate our voices and our stories that not being told or heard around reproductive justice. In this workshop we will explore how to bring back all the knowledge learned at CLPP so that we can support our communities and continue this important work. We will talk about the issues that matter to us! This is our time to share our visions for a stronger youth-led movement, and make connections that will extend beyond conference weekend and just have fun!
Speakers (click to view): Genesis Aquino, Heather L. Ramirez

Our Voices and Our Bodies Matter: Connecting Youth 2 Youth

Speakers

Genesis Aquino

Genesis Aquino is currently a 2012- 2013 ELLA Fellow at Sadie Nash Leadership Project. Her ELLA project “Empowering Sunset for Sexual & Reproductive Justice” focuses on promoting sexual andreproductive empowerment from a social justice lens by uplifting the unheard voices and providing a safe spacevfor youth and womyn of color in Sunset Park, Brooklyn, through community education and organizing. As an Afro-Latina activist her work has been focused on addressing the systems of oppression that most directly impact all her intersections,and her experience as a woman of color. Genesis graduated from Lehman College on 2012, where she earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Social Work with a minor in Urban Community Development.

Heather L. Ramirez

Heather roots in Environmental Justice organizing, this Fierce Tejana began to witness how the root issues of both Reproductive Justice and Environmental Justice intersected. After becoming aware of the lack of organizing among peers for Reproductive Justice, she became an ELLA fellow through the Sadie Nash Leadership Project, and developed a network of student activists to learn, strategize, and work together to achieve reproductive justice.
Time:
Location:
FPH 103
Reproductive Justice 101
Heard the term reproductive justice thrown around a lot? Not really sure what it means or where it comes from? As a framework that many social justice organizations and activists base their work on, it’s important for us to understand what it is we are talking about. Join us to have some of those questions answered and engage in a dialogue on the history, meaning, and application of reproductive justice in our work toward achieving reproductive freedom. Hear from facilitators working on reproductive justice in a number of capacities and figure out what it means for you!
Speakers (click to view): Rachael Strickler

Reproductive Justice 101

Speakers

Rachael Strickler

Rachael Strickler is a first year student at Hampshire College. She is studying the intersectionality of oppressions through the lens of politics and philosophy with a focus on Reproductive Justice and the Prison System. She is an intern at CLPP and one of Hampshire's student organizers working with the group Justice for Ayyub.
Time:
Location:
JLC 131
Reproductive Justice: A Roundtable Discussion
This year marks the 10th anniversary of the March for Women's Lives and also of Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice. This will be an intergenerational conversation among leaders in the field, about the evolution and current state of the Reproductive Justice movement, how the RJ framework has advanced their advocacy, and the challenges facing reproductive justice activists and advocates today.
Speakers (click to view): Marlene Gerber Fried, Monica Raye Simpson, Rye Young, Tannia Esparza, Loretta J. Ross, Shivana Jorawar

Reproductive Justice: A Roundtable Discussion

Speakers

Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a longtime activist and scholar, the CLPP Faculty Director and founding president and board member of the National Network of Abortion Funds. Currently she is a visiting fellow in the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and working on an international abortion advocacy project with Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights. She is a co-author of Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice.

Monica Raye Simpson

Monica Raye Simpson has organized extensively against human rights violations, the prison industrial complex, racism and intolerance, and the systematic physical and emotional violence inflicted upon the minds, bodies and spirits of African Americans with an emphasis on African American women and the African American LBGT community. Monica is also a performance artist and is committed to using her talents of in her local community and nationally to address social justice issues.

Rye Young

Rye Young is Third Wave Fund's Director. He began his career as an abortion fund hotline intern at Third Wave Foundation (the organization that became Third Wave Fund). Rye served on staff of Third Wave for five years in various program roles, and dedicated himself to developing systems for impact measurement and grantmaking, while crafting programs that met the needs of Third Wave's grassroots, community-based organizations.

Tannia Esparza

Tannia Esparza is the Executive Director at Young Women United (YWU), a reproductive justice organization, lead by and for Young Women of Color in Albuquerque, NM. As YWU’s director she ensures organizing, policy, and communications strategies continue to uplift all people in making real decisions about their bodies and lives.

Loretta J. Ross

Loretta J. Ross was a co-founder and the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012. Ms. Ross is an expert on women’s issues, racism and intolerance, human rights, and violence against women and speaks at many colleges and universities.

Shivana Jorawar

J.D., Reproductive Justice Program Director at the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum (NAPAWF)
Time:
Location:
JLC 120
Self Cervical Exam: Abortion, Menstrual Stories, Birth Control, and Self-Examination As Tools for Self-Determination
This workshop seeks to foster a multicultural, multigenerational conversation among feminists, activists and other wise women to share strategies on controlling our reproduction and expressing our sexuality as a means toward liberation. We will discuss the historical context in which women-controlled healthcare and self-examination were developed to combat coercive and abusive population policies, as well as equip participants with practical techniques for self cervical examination.
Speakers (click to view): Kim Robinson

Self Cervical Exam: Abortion, Menstrual Stories, Birth Control, and Self-Examination As Tools for Self-Determination

Speakers

Kim Robinson

Director of Health Services at Women’s Health Specialists, Kim coordinates the provision of reproductive health services to over 35,000 women and men in rural far-northern California annually. Kim conducts workshops and training sessions locally, statewide and nationally. Kim has presented at the national Sistersong Conference; the California Coalition for Reproductive Freedom’s Day, at the State Capitol; Civil Liberties and Public Policy Conference, Building the Movement for Reproductive Freedom at Hampshire College, Amherst Massachusetts and at numerous public forums in Northern California. She is the host of “It’s Your Body”, a WHS sponsored radio show on KZFR community radio in Butte County. Kim is a founding member of Northern California State Budget Alliance and an active member of the Butte County Hispanic Resource Council.
Time:
Location:
FPH 106
Showing Up in Solidarity When Racism and Privilege Are the Co-hosts

The hashtag #solidarityisforwhitewomen created by Mikki Kendall (@Karnythia) is an example of an incomplete dialogue among Black women and white women in the women's rights, feminist, social justice movements and has widened even more where our gender, sexualities and politics intersect. The goal of this workshop is to hear white women share their examples of the ways in which they benefit from privilege on a daily basis. We know that there are white women who are genuinely invested in working towards racial justice and we want to provide a space to discus and generate proactive ways to be in solidarity with black women though brainstorming and story sharing. Many times these discussions are held in a space at the expense of the people who are the subjects of oppression, primarily gender non conforming, women and trans people of color in sharing experiences of their trauma. We want to hear a different discussion where white women are addressing each other in a way that informs women of color about what steps they are willing to actively take to address the ways they benefit as well as actively and passively participate in the benefits of white privilege. Participants will leave workshop with a toolbox of ways to act in solidarity with black women.

Speakers (click to view): Jasmine Burnett, Lindsey O-Pries

Showing Up in Solidarity When Racism and Privilege Are the Co-hosts

Speakers

Jasmine Burnett

Jasmine Burnett is a Black Feminist, writer, activist and consultant who focuses on sex, sexuality, and reproductive justice to promote sexual liberation and health access for women/womyn of color. She is an organizer for SisterSong NYC and is the National Mobilization Chair for the Trust Black Women Partnership. She is founder, lover, and creatress of Aunt Betty's Basement, a sex positive community on Facebook for women of color that celebrates our fluid sexualities and gender identities. Her work has been featured in the Huffington Post, On the Issues Magazine, and Clutch Magazine's 10 Black Women Teaching Us About Sex.

Lindsey O-Pries

Lindsey O-Pries is the Member Support Coordinator for the National Network of Abortion Funds, where she focuses her energy on joining member Funds in creating powerful and sustainable organizations from the ground up, while simultaneously defeating the Hyde Amendment. Lindsey is a co-founder of the Richmond Reproductive Freedom Project, a Network member abortion Fund and also has worked with many other social justice organizations over the past 11 years. She received a BA in Women’s Studies from Virginia Commonwealth University, although most of her education has come from the lived experiences of fierce people in this movement and her home, Richmond, VA.
Time:
Location:
ASH 112
Stand Up Against Population Alarmism
Many of us learn from school and the media that "overpopulation" is one of the major causes, if not the major cause, of hunger, poverty, environmental degradation, migration and even political instability. "Overpopulation" thinking often leads to harmful policies and campaigns that undermine reproductive freedom and environmental justice. Learn to combat it with fresh, feminist perspectives on population, the environment and organizing. Speakers will discuss how to challenge population alarmism in reproductive justice and environmental justice organizing.
Speakers (click to view): Anne Hendrixson, Betsy Hartmann, Senti Sojwal

Stand Up Against Population Alarmism

Speakers

Anne Hendrixson

Anne Hendrixson is a reproductive health advocate, writer, and speaker focused on the politics of global health and population. She is an alumna of Hampshire College (class of '91) and has a Masters from the International Development and Social Change Master's Program at Clark University. As a previous PopDev Coordinator (from 1996 - 2000), she is returning to the program after 12 years. During that time she served as Assistant Director for aids2031 (a project commissioned by UNAIDS to chart a long-term, global response to AIDS) and was a key contributor to recommendations for addressing the underlying social factors of HIV transmission, treatment and prevention.

Betsy Hartmann

Betsy Hartmann is the Director of the Population and Development Program and Professor of Development Studies at Hampshire College. A longstanding activist in the international women's health movement, she teaches, writes and speaks about the intersections of population, environment, reproductive rights and security issues. Her books include Reproductive Rights and Wrongs: The Global Politics of Population Control.

Senti Sojwal

Senti Sojwal is a fourth-year student at Hampshire College from NYC concentrating in women's and gender studies and creative writing. She has been involved with CLPP for the past three years and is a co-chair this year for the conference's outreach committee.
Time:
Location:
FPH 108
Supporting Women in the USA Who Self-Induce Their Own Abortion
Around the world in countries where abortion is legally restricted, women have used misoprostol to safely end an unwanted pregnancy. Many women have brought that knowledge with them to the US, and as more abortion restrictions pass in the states, women are turning to self-induction. This workshop will cover the ways to use the medicines effectively and safely, identify strategies for sharing this information with women within the law, and share models for action from other countries in the Americas that have restrictive abortion laws and good access to safe abortion with medicines.
Speakers (click to view): Susan Yanow

Supporting Women in the USA Who Self-Induce Their Own Abortion

Speakers

Susan Yanow

A long-time reproductive rights activist, Ms. Yanow was the founding Executive Director of the Abortion Access Project. Ms. Yanow is currently a consultant to a number of U.S and international reproductive rights and health organizations that work to advance access to abortion, including ANSIRH (Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health) at UCSF, Ibis Reproductive Health, the Reproductive Health Access Project (RHAP), Women on Web and Women on Waves.
Time:
Location:
ASH 222
Texans Organizing for Reproductive Justice
Access to reproductive health care has been under heavy attack in the last few years, leaving many unable to afford the safe and legal health care services they need. But the resistance that Texas has shown has been strong and growing, and from the long-term organizing in the Rio Grande Valley to the surge of support around Wendy Davis' filibuster, Texans are figuring out how to get the health care they need. Come hear from panelists using an intersectional approach to their work in Texas and learn about their efforts to ensure that reproductive justice is a reality for all Texans.
Speakers (click to view): Yatzel Sabat , Jessica González-Rojas, Kimberly Inez McGuire, Rocío Villalobos

Texans Organizing for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Yatzel Sabat

Yatzel is a Puerto Rican, anarcha-feminist, queer reproductive/social justice activist and organizer who has lived in Austin, TX for a decade now. Yatzel a founding and active member of RiseUp/LevantaTX, and a co-founder of the Texas Abortion Access Front.

Jessica González-Rojas

Jessica González-Rojas is the Executive Director at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, the only national reproductive justice organization that specifically works to advance reproductive health and rights for Latinas. She has been a leader in progressive movements for over 15 years, successfully forging connections between reproductive health, gender, immigration, LGBTQ liberation, labor and Latino civil rights, breaking down barriers between movements and building a strong Latina grassroots presence.

Kimberly Inez McGuire

Kimberly Inez McGuire is the Associate Director of Government Relations and Public Affairs for the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health. Kimberly coordinates the public affairs and communications work of NLIRH, conducts policy analysis and legislative advocacy, and works closely with the NLIRH team to promote salud, dignidad, y justicia for Latin@s nationwide. Kimberly is a reproductive justice advocate and public policy professional with several years’ experience in legislative relations and strategic communications. Previously, Kimberly worked as Senior Associate for Programs and Policy at the Reproductive Health Technologies Project, where she managed a ground-breaking research project on Latin@ attitudes on abortion. Kimberly writes and presents on a range of issues, including: abortion access and affordability; immigrant women’s health and rights; health equity; contraceptive technologies; and environmental justice.

Rocío Villalobos

Rocío Villalobos is an advisor and the Social Justice Education and Leadership Coordinator at the UT-Austin Multicultural Engagement Center. In addition to her organizing work with Rise Up Texas, Rocío is a board member at the Women’s Community Center of Central Texas and the YWCA Greater Austin. She also volunteers with the immigrant rights coalition Texans United for Families, coordinates a visitation program to a detention center, and is a collective member with MonkeyWrench Books.
Time:
Location:
FPH 102
The Politics of Adoption: Race, Identity, and Our Families' Lives
Too often adoption is co-opted by the Right as an easy solution to unplanned pregnancies here and in the Global South, young and unwed motherhood, poverty, and displacement. Missing from this political narrative are our stories about how adoption has helped build our families, and also engender loss. In this session, panelists will explore how the politics of transracial and transnational adoption has both shaped our understandings of race, family and nation, and profoundly affected the families, nations and children involved.
Speakers (click to view): Barbara Yngvesson, Susan Harris O'Connor, Yong Chan Miller , Coya White Hat-Artichoker

The Politics of Adoption: Race, Identity, and Our Families' Lives

Speakers

Barbara Yngvesson

Barbara Yngvesson is Professor Emerita of Anthropology at Hampshire College in Amherst, MA. Her research focuses on the legal production of adoptability, adoptee experiences of identity and belonging, and returns by adopted adults to their nations of origin. She is the author or co-author of numerous articles on transnational adoption, open adoption, and transnational motherhood. Her most recent book is Belonging in an Adopted World: Race, Identity, and Transnational Adoption (Chicago, 2010).

Susan Harris O'Connor

Susan Harris O'Connor is the director of Quality Assurance at Children's Services of Roxbury, Inc. She is the author of The Harris Narratives: An Introspective Study of a Transracial Adoptee, autobiographical monologues that explore race, identity, emotional intelligence, adoption and child welfare, and which have been performed around the country in academic, clinical and child welfare settings to wide acclaim over the last sixteen years.

Yong Chan Miller

Yong Chan Miller is a transnational and transracial adoptee with over 20 years of social justice activism experience. She is a founding board member and past president of Surge Northwest, a reproductive justice organization based in Seattle, WA. She currently lives in Oakland, CA where she is a research director for an organization working on Asian American racial justice issues.

Coya White Hat-Artichoker

Coya was born and raised on the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota; she is a proud enrolled member of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. Coya has been doing activist work in various communities and movements since the age of 15. She is a member of the First Nations Two Spirit Collective, which is a collective working to building a stronger political presence for Two Spirit people within the national dialogue of queer rights.
Time:
Location:
FPH 107
Transfeminism
Our panel of trans women academics, activists, professionals, and organizers will explore feminism, gender justice, and the connections between trans liberation and reproductive rights, as well as the tensions and conflicts that have prevented trans women from engaging fully with reproductive justice movements. Panelists will share their perspectives and experiences from working in social justice movements, from challenging assumptions about gender and sexuality to their work advancing more expansive and intersectional politics around feminism and gender justice.
Speakers (click to view): Bamby Salcedo, Katherine Cross, Morgan Robyn Collado

Transfeminism

Speakers

Bamby Salcedo

Bamby Salcedo is the HIV Prevention Services Project Coordinator with Childrens Hospital Los Angeles. Bamby is the founder and President of The Trans-Latin@ Coalition. Ms Salcedo is a proud Latina transgender woman who is recognized nationwide for her advocacy work related to trans issues; Bamby is also working with The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) developing a blue print on how to provide health care services for trans people in Latin America and The Caribbean.

Katherine Cross

Katherine Cross is a feminist sociologist and board member at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. She has written and spoken extensively about trans-feminism, reproductive rights, gender on the internet, video games, and trans women's political lives. Her work has appeared in Women's Studies Quarterly, The Occupied Times of London, and Bitch Magazine, and she is a co-editor of the feminist gaming blog The Border House.

Morgan Robyn Collado

Morgan is the latest in a long line of badass bitches. She is walking in the footsteps of Audre Lorde, Sylvia Rivera and her own mother to achieve the collective liberation of all peoples. Morgan hopes to use her poems, essays and stories to challenge, inspire and incite radical action. She uses female pronouns.
Time:
Location:
FPH West Lecture Hall
We Hollaback!: The Intersection of Street Harassment & Reproductive Justice
Street harassment is an attack on women/LGBTQ peoples' bodily autonomy and limits where we go and when. We will ask participants what street harassment has looked like in their own lives and share our vision for a world without street harassment. Together we will brainstorm ways that we can fight street harassment in our own communities. We hope that participants leave with the belief that together, we can create a world without street harassment.
Speakers (click to view): Kate Ziegler, Britni de la Cretaz

We Hollaback!: The Intersection of Street Harassment & Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Kate Ziegler

Kate Ziegler is an operations professional by day, a designer by night, and Co-Founder and Co-Director for Hollaback! Boston in her spare time. Kate received her BS in International Affairs and Anthropology from Northeastern University, and is perpetually in search of everlasting lipstick.

Britni de la Cretaz

Britni de la Cretaz is the co-founder and co-director of Hollaback! Boston. She is a social worker by day and social justice activist by night, and received her Bachelor's Degree from Northeastern University and her Master's Degree from Nova Southeastern University. She is a big believer in sequins and sleeping in.
Time:
Location:
FPH 104

Saturday Session 2 3:15PM - 4:45PM

After Tiller: The Landscape of Later Abortion in America
Later abortions (abortions after 20 weeks) only encompass 1.5% of all abortions in the United States, yet the procedures and those who provide them suffer some of the greatest attacks in reproductive healthcare. There are only four American doctors left who openly include later abortion care in their medical practice. Dr. Susan Robinson is one of these four doctors and she will join us to share her unique perspective. Wendy Robinson will share her advocacy experience around the subject as Director of Voice of Choice. NARAL Pro-Choice America will offer a national political and policy overview around later abortions.
Speakers (click to view): Susan C. Robinson, M. D., Wendy Robinson, K. Travis Ballie

After Tiller: The Landscape of Later Abortion in America

Speakers

Susan C. Robinson, M. D.

Dr. Susan Robinson has specialized in abortion care since 2001. She was privileged to work with Dr. George Tiller in Wichita until his assassination in 2009 and is now doing all trimester abortion care with two other docs at Southwestern Women’s Options in Albuquerque, NM. Susan lives in California with her wonderful partner and enjoys being a thorn in the side of the anti-abortion fanatics.

Wendy Robinson

Wendy is Director of the all volunteer organization Voice of Choice (vochoice.org and Facebook.com/vochoice) which works to counter anti-choice extremists and hosts the "bullies" rogue gallery. She believes reproductive rights are central to women's autonomy, and that abortion and contraceptives should be safe, legal and accessible.

K. Travis Ballie

Travis is the Manager of Affiliate & National Programs for NARAL Pro-Choice America. He is responsible for providing support for NARAL’s 22 affiliates, chapter, & choice action team. Travis also runs NARAL’s DC Volunteer Program, as well as the Choice Out Loud – On Campus millennial engagement program. He is a graduate of American University (’10) with a Double B.A. In International Relations & International Business.
Time:
Location:
FPH Main Lecture Hall
Building Faith and Secular Partnerships in the Fight for Reproductive Justice
Many communities of faith have long been partners in social justice movements. In this workshop, we will talk about why we work to strengthen faith communities engaged in reproductive justice work, such as health care, access to contraception and abortion, and sex education. Participants will gain an understanding of why faith communities can be important partners in this work, how faith leaders are currently engaging with the movement, and see examples of successful faith/secular partnerships from progressive movements. Participants will share their challenges and successes working with faith communities, as well as workshop messaging strategies and best practices so they leave with clear ideas on how to partner with communities of faith.
Speakers (click to view): Rev. Emma Akpan, Heidi Williamson, Jennifer Kinne

Building Faith and Secular Partnerships in the Fight for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Rev. Emma Akpan

Rev. Emma Akpan is an ordained deacon in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. She is a activist and writer living in Raleigh, NC and writes on the intersection of spirituality and social justice on her blog emmanism.com.

Heidi Williamson

Heidi Williamson is the Senior Policy Analyst for the Women’s Health and Rights Program at American Progress. Prior to joining American Progress, Heidi worked for the Alzheimer’s Association, SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Health Collective, and the Service Employees International Union, or SEIU. She has successfully led legislative and advocacy efforts in the South and helped elect more than 20 women legislators to office at the state and local level.

Jennifer Kinne

Jennifer Kinne works as a Field Organizer with Planned Parenthood Advocates of Michigan. Her organizing work includes building coalitions, volunteer recruitment, and community outreach opportunities in West and Mid-Michigan. She is an alumnus of the Center for American Progress Faith & Progressive Leadership Institute, and is currently working to develop partnerships between faith communities and Planned Parenthood in Michigan.
Time:
Location:
FPH 107
Careers in the Movement
Can you follow your passion for reproductive justice, and create a career for yourself in the movement? Come hear how our panelists have found opportunities to pursue exciting and creative work advancing reproductive justice in the law, research, advocacy, event planning, and media worlds, and in mentoring and inspiring new feminist activists.
Speakers (click to view): Carly Romeo, Jamille A. Fields, ESQ

Careers in the Movement

Speakers

Carly Romeo

Carly Romeo is a project manager, freelance photographer, cheerleader for gender equity born in Queens but raised amongst the Appalachian Mountains in Southwest Virginia. In 2010, Carly landed her dream job with Soapbox, Inc, helping schools and organizations across the country put together awesome feminist events.

Jamille A. Fields, ESQ

Jamille Fields is the Reproductive Justice Fellow at the National Health Law Program. While in law school, Jamille served as an editor for the Journal of Health Law and Policy and interned at NHeLP. Before law school, Jamille served as communications coordinator on Robin Carnahan’s Missouri Secretary of State campaign. She also interned in the offices of the Missouri Secretary of State and then-Senator Barack Obama.
Time:
Location:
FPH 105
Contraception 101
Most of us will come into contact with contraception during our lives as sexual beings. However, the conversation around different forms of contraception is not always one that includes all of us. In this workshop we will learn about the most common forms of contraception available and their effectiveness while keeping all bodies in mind. We’ll challenge the often gendered and heteronormative language surrounding much of the information on contraception and sex in order to offer a more comprehensive and welcoming conversation when discussing contraception. This workshop will help also participants understand what contraceptives will best suit their bodies and sexual practices.
Speakers (click to view): CLPP Student Group

Contraception 101

Speakers

CLPP Student Group

Time:
Location:
FPH 103
Creative Solutions to Abortion Restrictions
In the U.S., as in other countries, where abortion is highly restricted and not accessible, women are determined to get the healthcare they need, and taking matters into their own hands. In this workshop panelists will present an overview about self-induction abortion and conduct a values clarification exercise. We hope to raise awareness about self-induction, challenge myths and assumptions, and look at underlying values.
Speakers (click to view): Susan Yanow, Marlene Gerber Fried, Aimée Thorne-Thomsen

Creative Solutions to Abortion Restrictions

Speakers

Susan Yanow

A long-time reproductive rights activist, Ms. Yanow was the founding Executive Director of the Abortion Access Project. Ms. Yanow is currently a consultant to a number of U.S and international reproductive rights and health organizations that work to advance access to abortion, including ANSIRH (Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health) at UCSF, Ibis Reproductive Health, the Reproductive Health Access Project (RHAP), Women on Web and Women on Waves.

Marlene Gerber Fried

Marlene Gerber Fried is a longtime activist and scholar, the CLPP Faculty Director and founding president and board member of the National Network of Abortion Funds. Currently she is a visiting fellow in the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School and working on an international abortion advocacy project with Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights. She is a co-author of Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice.

Aimée Thorne-Thomsen

Aimée Thorne-Thomsen is Vice President for Strategic Partnerships at Advocates for Youth, which champions policies and programs to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. In that capacity, she oversees and coordinates the development, implementation, and evaluation of Advocates’ strategic partnerships with youth activists and colleague organizations, including those in the social and reproductive justice movements.
Time:
Location:
MDB Recital Hall
Full-Spectrum Doula Practice 101: Starting a Doula Organization or Collective
Since 2007, full-spectrum and radical doula organizations have formed around the country to serve the needs of many communities. This workshop seeks to focus on building the capacity of existing and future full-spectrum and radical doula groups around the country by fostering collaborative learning and strategizing across geographic borders. Leaders of The Doula Project (NY), The Chicago Doula Circle (IL), Cicada Collective (TX), and Bay Area Doula Project (CA) will share personal stories of founding each project while discussing different models for a full-spectrum doula group, conducting trainings, gaining access to clinics and clients, differences in providing support for first/second trimester abortions or medication abortions, inclusivity in care, and finding allies. Participants will have the opportunity to share and strategize around their individual goals with doula group representatives and other allies from their region before reconvening to share visions and plans for a national network of full-spectrum doula projects.
Speakers (click to view): Kate Palmer, Lauren Mitchell, Noreen, Poonam Dreyfus-Pai

Full-Spectrum Doula Practice 101: Starting a Doula Organization or Collective

Speakers

Kate Palmer

Kate Palmer is a queer, working-class activist and full-spectrum doula originally from Detroit. She currently coordinates the Chicago Doula Circle, which provides abortion doula support in the Chicagoland area. By day, she manages HIV care in the emergency room at Cook County Hospital and works as a consultant for health care providers seeking to improve queer/LGBT patient care experiences. Additionally, she's working on developing a support network for queer people that experience infertility.

Lauren Mitchell

Lauren Mitchell is a full-spectrum doula, reproductive health counselor, and a practitioner of narrative medicine (meaning: using writing to help providers and patients create meaning and resolution in their experiences). She has worked with over a thousand clients throughout the spectrum of choice, and has trained and mentored hundreds of activists, medical students, and clinicians.

Noreen

Noreen is a brown queer disabled social justice organizer living in Texas. They are a co-founder of the Cicada Collective, a QTPOC-centered reproductive justice resource center and doula network that began in North Texas. Their other interests include anti-racist and anti-authoritarian community building and exploring the intersections of dis/ability and race/class/gender.

Poonam Dreyfus-Pai

Poonam Dreyfus-Pai is a full-spectrum doula, researcher, and co-director of the Bay Area Doula Project, which provides compassionate support to people before, during, and after their abortions. Poonam is also pursuing both an MPH and MSW at UC Berkeley; her graduate research with ANSIRH's Sea Change program focuses on abortion stigma. She is committed to building collaborative networks that work to support all reproductive experiences.
Time:
Location:
FPH East Lecture Hall
Invisible: Women in America's Prisons and Jails
Focusing on the lived experiences of women in prisons and jails, this session will expand participants' understanding of how sexism, racism and classism and gender-based violence are integral parts of these systems. Speakers will discuss innovative organizing models that ensure participation at the leadership level by incarcerated women, and will focus on work happening in Massachusetts and around the country now, including the campaign to ban the shackling of pregnant women in prisons/jails, organizing to end money bail, stop the building of new jails and creating community-based wellness alternatives.
Speakers (click to view): Tina Reynolds, Marianne Bullock, Andrea James, Lois Ahrens, Megan Amundson

Invisible: Women in America's Prisons and Jails

Speakers

Tina Reynolds

Tina Reynolds is Co-Founder and Chair of Women on the Rise Telling HerStory (WORTH). WORTH is an association of formerly and currently incarcerated women who have been empowered by their own experiences while involved in the criminal justice system and beyond. Through mutual support, leadership development, organizing and telling our stories, WORTH transforms the lives of women who have been directly impacted by incarceration and changes public perception and policy. Reynolds has received a Master in Social Work from Hunter College. She is currently an adjunct professor at York, CUNY in the Psychology Department teaching the “Impact of Incarceration on Families, Communities and Children”. She has published pieces on the abolition of prisons, the impact of incarceration on women and children, formerly incarcerated women and policy change and is an editor of an anthology “Interrupted Life: Experiences of Incarcerated Women in the United States”.

Marianne Bullock

Marianne Bullock is a founder and Lead Doula with The Prison Birth Project. She is apprenticing to be a Certified Professional Midwife and is currently an Ada Comstock Scholar at Smith College studying motherhood, race and confinement. She has worked with MomsRising.org on economic justice and family policy issues at a state and national level.

Andrea James

Andrea James is the Executive Director of families for Justice as Healing, the founder of AJames Group, and the author of Upper Bunkies Unite. She commits her time to reducing the prison population of women and creating economic opportunity for formerly incarcerated women.

Lois Ahrens

Lois Ahrens has been an activist and organizer for social justice for almost fifty years. In 2000 she started the Real Cost of Prisons Project, a national organization which brings together activists, artists, justice policy researchers and people directly experiencing the impact of mass incarceration so that together we can more effectively work to end the U.S. prison nation.

Megan Amundson

Megan Amundson is the Executive Director of NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts. Prior to this position, Megan was the Principal of Megan Amundson Strategies, a political consulting firm focusing on grassroots legislative, electoral, and community relations campaigns. Megan has a Masters Degree in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning from Tufts University and a Bachelors Degree from the University of Minnesota.
Time:
Location:
ASH 112
Media Making for Change with the Youth Action Coalition
Youth Action Coalition (YAC) is an Amherst-based youth empowerment organization that combines social justice education, quality media arts and youth leadership through their unique Arts-for-Change programming. YAC youth will lead a workshop to share their individual work as well as strategies for making media for change. This workshop will draw upon ‘zine making and in-camera edits as the group works together to create short films. As a part of the workshop YAC youth will have materials to send home with participants so that they can refer to them for future use in media making.
Speakers (click to view): Youth Action Coalition , Brittany Bellefleur, Aolani Whitebear

Media Making for Change with the Youth Action Coalition

Speakers

Youth Action Coalition

The Youth Action Coalition is an Arts-For-Change program that engages youth and their allies, encouraging everyone to make art and write as a way to understand communities and address social justice issues. YAC runs 5 programs: Get Up Get Down, Video Vanguards, E'town Rising, GirlsEyeView Ware and GirlsEyeView Amherst, all of which have been exploring a common theme for the 2011-2012 academic year of, "Who are We, The People?" With a board of directors that is 50% youth and a staff of relatively young folks, YAC take great pride in hearing young voices and using art as a catalyst for change.

Brittany Bellefleur

Brittany Bellefleur is a sixteen year old member of GirlsEyeView, Ware and the current president of the GSA advisory at her high school. She’s passionate about LGBTQIA issues and the many faces of feminism. She dreams of going to college in New York City one day and loves the podcast “Welcome to Night Vale”.

Aolani Whitebear

Aolani Whitebear is a thirteen-year-old Peer Leader for GirlsEyeView, Ware and a youth member of the Youth Action Coalition Board. Some issues she’s passionate about are LGBTQIA youth movements, and finding time to read and write. She will turn fourteen on the Saturday of the conference and can’t wait to celebrate by making ‘zines with YOU!
Time:
Location:
FPH Faculty Lounge
Performing Abortion: Sharing our Reproductive Justice Stories through the Arts
On June 25th, 2013, Texas State Senator Wendy Davis launched a filibuster of the abortion ban bill SB5 by telling the stories of Texans’ personal experiences with abortion. The unprecedented airing of these often untold stories galvanized people across the country. While acknowledging the importance of confidential, safer spaces such as abortion speak outs, this interactive workshop led by artists and activists will focus on different ways to explore reproductive justice narratives in the context of public sharing, both from a personal standpoint as well as a political one.. With the help of prompts and group exercises, participants will generate art projects in various media - visual, prose, and/or performance - and will have the opportunity to share their creations.
Speakers (click to view): Madeline Burrows, Merritt Tierce, Rosemary Candelario

Performing Abortion: Sharing our Reproductive Justice Stories through the Arts

Speakers

Madeline Burrows

Madeline Burrows is a Boston-based activist, actor and musician and a member of the International Socialist Organization. Her solo show MOM BABY GOD, based on undercover research on the youth anti-choice movement, is currently on tour across the country. She plays drums and sings in the feminist punk band, Tomboy. A graduate of Hampshire College, Madeline’s writing has appeared at Socialistworker.org and The Nation.

Merritt Tierce

Merritt Tierce is a founding board member and Executive Director of the Texas Equal Access Fund (TEA Fund), a 501(c)3 nonprofit abortion fund based in Dallas, Texas. She has volunteered and worked for the TEA Fund for almost ten years, and is also a fiction writer. Merritt co-wrote (with Gretchen Dyer and Victoria Loe Hicks) the original abortion play One in 3 (2009), and her first novel will be published by Doubleday in September 2014.

Rosemary Candelario

Rosemary Candelario is a long-time educator, artist, and activist for reproductive justice.
Time:
Location:
FPH 106
Politicizing Black Wombs: the Right’s Racial Reconciliation Movement
The Christian Right’s effort to cultivate support among communities of color is not a new phenomenon, and the Right’s agenda to limit women’s bodily autonomy has been an ongoing threat for decades. But recent years have revealed increasingly sophisticated strategies. Hiding behind the façade of racial reconciliation, the Right is now pressing for dramatic rollbacks on abortion access and family planning — changes that disproportionately impact women of color. Come to hear more about the origins of this narrative and how it has been incorporated into evangelical adoption theology, with particular implications for adoptees of color and biological families in developing nations.
Speakers (click to view): Kathryn Joyce, Tope Fadiran Charlton, Akiba Solomon

Politicizing Black Wombs: the Right’s Racial Reconciliation Movement

Speakers

Kathryn Joyce

Kathryn Joyce is an investigative journalist and author of The Child Catchers: Rescue, Trafficking and the New Gospel of Adoption and Quiverfull: Inside the Christian Patriarchy Movement. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Slate, The American Prospect, The Nation, Mother Jones, The Atlantic and many others.

Tope Fadiran Charlton

Tope Fadiran Charlton is a writer and researcher whose work addresses the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality in American culture. She is a research fellow with Political Research Associates, a progressive social justice think tank. Her work has appeared in The Guardian, Salon, Bitch Magazine, and other outlets.

Akiba Solomon

Akiba Solomon is the editorial director of Colorlines, the online magazine where race matters.
Time:
Location:
FPH 108
Queering Reproductive Justice
Queer, trans and gender non-conforming people have been deeply involved in movements for bodily autonomy and reproductive justice, but the mainstream reproductive health and rights movement has often been silent on the issues that affect these communities. Hear from panelists on how the movements for reproductive justice and LGBTQ liberation align and inform each other, and ways queer and trans experiences can be brought to the center of reproductive justice advocacy and organizing.
Speakers (click to view): Ricky Hill, La'Tasha D. Mayes, Lauren Paulk, Verónica Bayetti Flores

Queering Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Ricky Hill

Ricky Hill is a doctoral student and instructor at the University of New Mexico, focusing on health communication within LGBTQQIA communities. They also coordinate economic justice and peer advocacy workshops at the Transgender Resource Center of New Mexico. A proud Oklahoman, Ricky blogs about queer things for Oklahomans for Reproductive Justice.

La'Tasha D. Mayes

La'Tasha D. Mayes, MSPPM is nationally recognized leader in the field of sexual and reproductive health, Human Rights and leadership development for women and girls of color. La'Tasha is the Founder and Executive Director of New Voices Pittsburgh: Women of Color for Reproductive Justice, a community-based organization dedicated to the health and well-being of Black women and girls.

Lauren Paulk

Lauren is the Reproductive Justice Fellow at the National Center for Lesbian Rights, where she works to improve policies at the intersections of queer liberation and reproductive justice. She graduated from CUNY School of Law in 2013, where she studied the criminalization of sexuality in an international context. Prior to law school, Lauren did dating violence prevention and support work. She hails from the Midwest.

Verónica Bayetti Flores

Veronica has worked to increase access to contraception, fought for paid sick leave, demanded access to safe public space for queer youth of color, and helped to lead social justice efforts in Wisconsin and New York City. She is a Policy Research Specialist at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, and she sits on the boards of the National Coalition for LGBT Health and the National Network of Abortion Funds.
Time:
Location:
FPH104
Repealing the Hyde Amendment: the All* Above All campaign & the Movement to Ensure Abortion Access
The Hyde Amendment bars the use of federal funds to cover abortion care. Join a group of reproductive justice activists to learn more about All* Above All, the new national movement to repeal the Hyde Amendment and strengthen support for abortion access. We will discuss advocacy from local, state and national viewpoints. Come strategize, connect, and learn about ways to get involved in this work.
Speakers (click to view): Jessica González-Rojas, Ho Nguyen, Jenny Dodson Mistry, Lydia Karch

Repealing the Hyde Amendment: the All* Above All campaign & the Movement to Ensure Abortion Access

Speakers

Jessica González-Rojas

Jessica González-Rojas is the Executive Director at the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, the only national reproductive justice organization that specifically works to advance reproductive health and rights for Latinas. She has been a leader in progressive movements for over 15 years, successfully forging connections between reproductive health, gender, immigration, LGBTQ liberation, labor and Latino civil rights, breaking down barriers between movements and building a strong Latina grassroots presence.

Ho Nguyen

Born and raised in Minnesota, Ho is first generation Vietnamese American. She has an MA in Public Policy and Leadership from the University of St. Thomas. Her background is in housing, homelessness, and poverty. She loves spreading the good word of social justice, and believes in raising social consciousness in herself and others through dialogue and self-reflection.

Jenny Dodson Mistry

Jenny Dodson Mistry is the Manager of Local Initiatives at the National Institute for Reproductive Health. She works primarily on the Urban Initiative for Reproductive Health, providing grants and technical assistance to partners across the country to advance innovative and proactive reproductive rights policies on the local level.

Lydia Karch

Lydia holds degrees in Anthropology and Reproductive Health. She hails from Appleton, WI, a town known for making paper and fanatic devotion to the Green Bay Packers. Lydia has taught rape and sexual assault classes in Boston public high schools, worked with HIV and intimate partner violence in Atlanta, and served as a Public Health Education volunteer with the Peace Corps in Peru.
Time:
Location:
ASH 221
Responding to Sexual Assault in our Communities
Sexual violence is not an isolated problem - it exists in all of our communities as a result of structural and power inequalities, limited access to resources and care, and a lack of culturally competent education and models for what healthy relationships can look like. What policies, networks, and accountability processes can we create that are responsive to our community’s needs? Drawing from their diverse backgrounds in immigrant, trans, LGB, indigenous, and youth organizing, our panelists will discuss their work combating sexual violence - from operating crisis hotlines to performance as a vehicle for cultural change - and brainstorm solutions with participants.
Speakers (click to view): Morgan Robyn Collado , Kashif Syed, Bhavana Nancherla, Jill Grimaldi

Responding to Sexual Assault in our Communities

Speakers

Morgan Robyn Collado

Morgan is the latest in a long line of badass bitches. She is walking in the footsteps of Audre Lorde, Sylvia Rivera and her own mother to achieve the collective liberation of all peoples. Morgan hopes to use her poems, essays and stories to challenge, inspire and incite radical action. She uses female pronouns.

Kashif Syed

Kashif Syed, JD, is currently the Law Students for Reproductive Justice Fellow at Advocates for Youth. There, he focuses on securing confidential access to sexual & reproductive health services for young people. Originally from the Midwest, he likes coffee, knitting, banjos, & bicycles.

Bhavana Nancherla

Bhavana is a NYC-based activist and nerd who likes to be reminded of how all our movements intersect. She first got involved through anti-violence work, and has since worked on sexual health education, sex worker rights, supporting youth organizing, and supporting kids/families in movements. Bhavana's also been learning about healing/transformative justice, and is excited about building movement spaces with more room for healing and transformation.

Jill Grimaldi

Jill Grimaldi is the Instructional designer for the Center for Women & Community (formerly Everywoman's Center). She is responsible for co-coordinating the CWC's volunteer Educator Advocates in providing free workshops and events to educate the Hampshire County Community about sexual and relationship violence, as well as working with innovative online tools to spread the CWC's education through the web. Jill is also a volunteer for the Abortion Rights Fund of Western Massachusetts and a passionate advocate for the Reproductive Justice movement.
Time:
Location:
JLC 131
Secks and Powah: Technology, Reproduction, and Gamer Culture
Reproductive justice begins from a vision of a better future, sired by imagination and dreaming. We will discuss the radical, intersectional history of using science fiction to visualize and promote (or decry) certain uses of reproductive technology and possible futures for reproduction, and explore gaming, particularly roleplaying gaming, as a way to imagine and embrace new technology. We will also look at gaming as an important media source and examine the lack of consent and communication around sex within game storylines, the gendered and hyper-sexualized or hyper-masculine portrayal of characters, whether cis- or trans-, and how gaming communities have both perpetuated and reacted to these issues. Are there games that are exceptions to these rules? And in what ways can we support inclusive, safe spaces in gaming?
Speakers (click to view): Tiffany E. Cook, Katherine Cross

Secks and Powah: Technology, Reproduction, and Gamer Culture

Speakers

Tiffany E. Cook

Tiffany’s reproductive justice framework comes from a hodgepodge of experience in health care, sex education, abortion funding, and full spectrum doula care. She currently works as a Gynecological Teaching Associate, but when she’s not on the table you might find her gaming or posting on social media. Look out for her upcoming blog posts on queer porn and sex education!

Katherine Cross

Katherine Cross is a feminist sociologist and board member at the Sylvia Rivera Law Project. She has written and spoken extensively about trans-feminism, reproductive rights, gender on the internet, video games, and trans women's political lives. Her work has appeared in Women's Studies Quarterly, The Occupied Times of London, and Bitch Magazine, and she is a co-editor of the feminist gaming blog The Border House.
Time:
Location:
FPH 102
The Revolution Starts with Me!: Recipes, Remedies, Rituals, & Resources for Activist Self Care
Self care is giving ourselves space to name our physical, emotional, intellectual, and spiritual needs so that we can engage in healthy practices that allow our needs to manifest in the best ways for us. How can activists practice self care in a world where we’re being pulled in multiple directions? How can community organizations, schools, and our communities support us in prioritizing self care? By using interactive activities, storytelling, and skill-sharing, this workshop will help activists recognize how burnout can manifest in activism and grassroots organizing. Collectively, we will develop recipes, remedies, rituals, and resources to incorporate self care into our daily practices. Participants will also receive "The Revolution Starts with Me! Incorporating Self Care and Preventing Burnout”, a self care zine with tools, exercises, and advice from the presenters.
Speakers (click to view): Adaku Utah, Nicole Clark, MSW

The Revolution Starts with Me!: Recipes, Remedies, Rituals, & Resources for Activist Self Care

Speakers

Adaku Utah

Adaku Utah is an activist, healer, teacher, and performance artist committed to nurturing authentic expression within folks and transformative and healing community spaces. She is a proud social justice co-conspirator, committed love warrior, and ever-evolving mover and shaker. She is the founder of SouLar Bliss (www.soularbliss.com), a collective space to share, create, discuss recipes, remedies, rituals and resources for healing ourselves and whole communities. She currently works with Project SAFE as a project facilitator, training and supporting youth and adults in educating and organizing around sexual health and reproductive justice issues. Her social justice work is coupled with her inspiring performance art. Her artistry is inspired by love, constructive rage, storytellers, acts of resistance, healing, nature, Nigeria and bridge building.

Nicole Clark, MSW

Nicole Clark is a social worker who works as a consultant, workshop presenter, and speaker for nonprofits and community groups who want to improve their approach to developing culturally relevant and youth and/or gender-positive programming, campaigns, and initiatives for youth, young women of color, women of color, and communities of color. She has a B.A. in Psychology from Spelman College and a Masters of Social Work degree from the Columbia University School of Social Work with a practice method centered on direct practice/counseling & program planning, implementation, and evaluation. Nicole is based in New York City.
Time:
Location:
FPH 101
The Unsustainability of The Military Industrial Complex
The U.S. military-prison-industrial-complex is a threat to our health and the future of our planet. The military and the national security state, including U.S. border enforcement and unsustainable prisons, degrade the environment and endanger our health and rights. Learn about how the U.S. military--the biggest culprit behind global environmental degradation--guzzles oil, develops and disposes of weapons, and creates a toxic legacy. Hear how U.S. border enforcement degrades the environment as it tramples on the health and rights of immigrants. And think about how prisons, a key sector of the national security state, strip the rights and health of prisoners through unsafe and unhealthy living and work conditions. This workshop is for peace, environmental and climate justice, and reproductive justice advocates.
Speakers (click to view): Betsy Hartmann, Pat Hynes, Sarah Launius

The Unsustainability of The Military Industrial Complex

Speakers

Betsy Hartmann

Betsy Hartmann is the Director of the Population and Development Program and Professor of Development Studies at Hampshire College. A longstanding activist in the international women's health movement, she teaches, writes and speaks about the intersections of population, environment, reproductive rights and security issues. Her books include Reproductive Rights and Wrongs: The Global Politics of Population Control.

Pat Hynes

Pat Hynes is a retired environmental engineer and Professor of Environmental Health who worked on issues of the urban environment (including lead poisoning, asthma and the indoor environment, safe housing, community gardens and urban agriculture); environmental justice; and feminism at Boston University School of Public Health. For her writing, teaching, and applied research, she has won numerous awards, including the US EPA Lifetime Achievement Award (2009), the 2003 National Delta Omega Award for Innovative Curriculum in Public Health; the US EPA Environmental Merit Award for Healthy Public Housing (2004) project and the Lead-Safe Yard Project (2000); and the 1996 National Arbor Day Foundation Book Award for A Patch of Eden, her book on community gardens in inner cities,. She is the author and editor of 7 books, including The Recurring Silent Spring and, most recently, Urban Health: Readings in the Social, Built and Physical Environments of U.S. Cities. She is currently publishing and speaking on the health effects of war and militarism on society and on women, in particular, and climate justice, renewable energy, and the hazards of nuclear power. She directs the Traprock Center for Peace and Justice in western Massachusetts http://traprock.info/index.shtml) .

Sarah Launius

I am a PhD student in the School of Geography and Development at the University of Arizona and co-founder of the Keep Tucson Together community-based immigration legal clinic. For the last decade I have worked with groups in southern Arizona on border and migrant justice issues.
Time:
Location:
FPH West Lecture Hall
Transforming Masculinities
This workshop is open to ALL and is designed to expand the way we understand gender beyond a binary of femininity and masculinity; and to offer a political framework that looks at the effects of masculinity socially and politically in our movements and organizations. We will look at strategies for addressing masculine privilege by sharing our stories of sexual & gender liberation in order to move masculinity from a place of power and control to a place of gender sovereignty and transformation. This workshop is open to ALL gender expressions and sexual orientations.
Speakers (click to view): Lucia Leandro Gimeno, Sebastian Margaret, Ashe Helm-Hernandez

Transforming Masculinities

Speakers

Lucia Leandro Gimeno

Lucia Leandro Gimeno is a Social Worker who just moved to Atlanta, GA after working in New York City for 13 years doing organizing with LGBTQ communities of color. He was a founding board member of FIERCE and former staff at The Audre Lorde Project. Lucia Leandro is a graduate of Hampshire and was also part of Ping Chong' s Undesirable Elements play Secret Suvivors, a play about adult survivors of child sexual abuse. Lucia Leandro is also a future full-spectrum doula.

Sebastian Margaret

Sebastian Margaret’s involvement with disability culture and multi – issue community resiliency spans 30 years. Informed by working/welfare class life, values and skills, Sebastian roots his work in racial, class, gender and immigration justice. He has trained and consulted extensively on Disability justice, class justice and anti-racism for grassroots organizations, service providers, conferences’ and community organizing efforts.

Ashe Helm-Hernandez

Ashe Helm-Hernandez is a member of Southerners On New Ground, (S.O.N.G.) & Alpha Psi Kappa Fraternity, Inc., the nation's largest nonprofit LGBT Greek organization specifically for dominant lesbians.
Time:
Location:
JLC 120

Saturday Session 3 5:15PM - 6:45PM

Abortion How-To: Medication and Surgical Abortion
A large portion of abortion stigma is tied to fear of the procedure itself. This workshop will demystify the process by demonstrating the simplicity and safety of medication abortion, as well as first and second trimester surgical abortion. Participants will examine their own values about abortion, based on personal experience, community norms, and media messaging. Participants will then simulate a medication abortion with pills, as well as first and second trimester surgical abortion. By learning the facts about the physical process of abortion, participants will be able to share this knowledge to increase empathy and solidarity for those seeking abortions, as well as remove barriers for abortion facilitation and support.
Speakers (click to view):

Abortion How-To: Medication and Surgical Abortion

Speakers
Time:
Location:
ASH 112
Access Denied: our new health care law and reproductive (in)justice.
Passing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was only part of the fight to obtain access to health care for all. States that do not expand Medicaid, particularly in the South, will force poor people - especially women, immigrants, people of color, young people, incarcerated people, and/or LGBT-identified folks - into a health care limbo, where they will pay fines for uninsurance but will be unable to receive care. Our panel of advocates and activists will explore attacks on our communities through the lens of race and poverty (denial of Medicaid expansion, coercive sterilization), immigration (citizenship requirements to access government health care), criminalization (overmedication, shackling), and LGBT issues (lack of access to competent care). We will share practical examples of how to respond to the law’s shortcomings, and highlight work being done by women in the South.
Speakers (click to view): Malika Redmond, Tiana V. Patterson, Andrea Flynn, Olivia Cappello, Andrea Flynn

Access Denied: our new health care law and reproductive (in)justice.

Speakers

Malika Redmond

Malika Redmond has a MA in women's studies and is a longstanding women's health and human rights advocate, researcher, proud Spelman College alumna, and new Executive Director of Spark Reproductive Justice Now!

Tiana V. Patterson

Tiana is a current Law Students for Reproductive Justice (LSRJ) fellow at Choice USA in Washington, D.C. Her work focuses on community organizing, policy, advocacy, and political engagement. She is a graduate of DePaul University Law School in Chicago, IL.

Andrea Flynn

Andrea Flynn is a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, where she researches and writes about U.S. and international reproductive health issues. She has published numerous articles and papers on state and federal laws and programs that impact reproductive health access. Andrea received her MPA/MPH from Columbia University and is a board member of the Third Wave Fund.

Olivia Cappello

Olivia Cappello interned at Raising Women's Voices for the Healthcare We Need in 2013 and 2014. While at RWV, she worked heavily on LGBT inclusion in the New York health insurance exchange. Olivia will graduate from Smith College in May 2014 and plans to continue working for reproductive justice.

Andrea Flynn

Andrea Flynn is a fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, where she researches and writes about U.S. and international reproductive health issues. She has published numerous articles and papers on state and federal laws and programs that impact reproductive health access. Andrea received her MPA/MPH from Columbia University and is a board member of the Third Wave Fund.
Time:
Location:
FPH 101
Blogging and Social Justice: A Skills-Building Workshop
This workshop will be an interactive session focused on writing political currents events pieces, how to gain a foot in the blogging world, and touch on how students might begin a political blog at their school. Today, online media is central to the spread of information and political knowledge. Blogging about current events is very connected to the evolving reproductive justice movement, because it provides a realm for people to share and exchange perspectives not represented in mainstream news. Original analysis is crucial for connecting the dots of social justice, and learning to write effectively can enhance activists’ ability to express themselves. We will do short writing exercises, group brainstorms, and hear from political bloggers!
Speakers (click to view): Senti Sojwal, April Grayce Dunlop, Eesha Pandit

Blogging and Social Justice: A Skills-Building Workshop

Speakers

Senti Sojwal

Senti Sojwal is a fourth-year student at Hampshire College from NYC concentrating in women's and gender studies and creative writing. She has been involved with CLPP for the past three years and is a co-chair this year for the conference's outreach committee.

April Grayce Dunlop

April Grayce Dunlop is a femme witch whose academic passions include writing in many forms, feminist, queer, & critical race theory, religious studies, and sexuality education. She is a signer for the student group Sexperts, a Peer Chaplain in the Spiritual Life Office, and a co-editor of PopDev’s political blog, The Black Sheep Journal. April is a last semester Division II student at Hampshire College.

Eesha Pandit

Eesha Pandit is a writer and reproductive justice activist. Her writing can be found here at The Crunk Feminist Collective, The Nation, Feministing, Salon, RH Reality Check, Feministe and In These Times. She has also appeared on numerous TV news outlets including CNN, HLN, and MSNBC. She most recently worked as Executive Director of Men Stopping Violence, a social change organization dedicated to ending men’s violence against women.
Time:
Location:
FPH 105
Careers in Healthcare
Healthcare workers, educators, and providers perform unique roles in the service of reproductive justice and as every day advocates. Our panel of healthcare workers will discuss their careers, entry and training, and highlight their experiences incorporating reproductive justice into their work.
Speakers (click to view): Anna Saeger, Lizzie Herskovitz, Meghan Coquillon

Careers in Healthcare

Speakers

Anna Saeger

A Hampshire College and CLPP alumna, Anna Saeger is an advocate and community health educator around issues of sexual health and wellness, HIV/AIDS, youth empowerment, and reproductive justice. Anna is currently an AIDS United AmeriCorps member working as an HIV Health Educator with the Erie Family Health Center of Chicago, IL. Through Erie’s Lending Hands for Life program, Anna provides prevention education, testing, medical and emotional support for people at risk or currently living with HIV/AIDS.

Lizzie Herskovitz

Lizzie Herskovitz is a Hampshire alum (F'01) and CNM. She currently attends home births all over Connecticut.

Meghan Coquillon

Meghan is a nurse, community organizer and proud Collective Member of the Richmond Reproductive Freedom Project in Richmond, VA. She is a former chapter leader for Nursing Students for Choice at Virginia Commonwealth University where she got her BSN and holds a BA in Women's & Gender studies from Stony Brook University.
Time:
Location:
ASH 222
Challenging Abortion Stigma on Your Campus
1 in 3 women will have an abortion in her lifetime. The 1 in 3 Campaign uses abortion story sharing, media, and activism to decrease the shame and stigma women feel around their own abortions. This session will allow participants to experience some of the stories from the 1 in 3 Campaign as well learn concrete strategies and tactics participants can employ on their campuses and communities to challenge abortion stigma and build support for abortion access.
Speakers (click to view): Amber J. Phillips, Carly Manes, Julia Reticker-Flynn

Challenging Abortion Stigma on Your Campus

Speakers

Amber J. Phillips

Amber J. Phillips trains and supports young people in becoming activists on their campuses and in their communities as they fight for issues that include: sexual health awareness, LGBTQ rights, gender equality, and ending the stigma around abortion through the 1 in 3 Campaign.

Carly Manes

Carly Manes is currently a Sophmore at the University of Michigan and am a youth activist for reproductive justice. She work with Advocats for Youth, Planned Parenthood, and a variety of other progressive national organizations. She is a member of Planned Parenthood's Young Leaders Advisory Council and the President of Students for Choice at the Univeristy of Michigan.

Julia Reticker-Flynn

Julia Reticker-Flynn is the Associate Director of Organizing and Mobilization at Advocates for Youth, where she works with young people across the country to advocate for cultural and policy change that supports young people’s sexual health and rights. She currently serves on the Board of Directors of Nursing Students for Choice.
Time:
Location:
FPH 102
Clinic Escorting and Buffer Zones: Mobilizing for Provider Safety
Clinics and doctors who provide abortions have faced illegal violence, threats, and harassment from the anti-abortion movement. They have also been subjected to unnecessary laws and regulations which make abortion more expensive and have forced many clinics to close their doors, thus restricting abortion access even further. Panelists will share their first hand knowledge and experience, and talk about how activists and providers are confronting these threats.
Speakers (click to view): Esha Bhandari , Megan Amundson , Susan C. Robinson, M. D.

Clinic Escorting and Buffer Zones: Mobilizing for Provider Safety

Speakers

Esha Bhandari

Esha joined the Center for Reproductive Rights in 2013 and works on a range of litigation actions, including the Center’s lawsuit against a Texas omnibus bill passed in 2013. She was previously an Equal Justice Works Fellow at the American Civil Liberties Union's Immigrants’ Rights Project, focusing on litigation throughout the country to protect the due process rights of immigrants who are detained.

Megan Amundson

Megan Amundson is the Executive Director of NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts. Prior to this position, Megan was the Principal of Megan Amundson Strategies, a political consulting firm focusing on grassroots legislative, electoral, and community relations campaigns. Megan has a Masters Degree in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning from Tufts University and a Bachelors Degree from the University of Minnesota.

Susan C. Robinson, M. D.

Dr. Susan Robinson has specialized in abortion care since 2001. She was privileged to work with Dr. George Tiller in Wichita until his assassination in 2009 and is now doing all trimester abortion care with two other docs at Southwestern Women’s Options in Albuquerque, NM. Susan lives in California with her wonderful partner and enjoys being a thorn in the side of the anti-abortion fanatics.
Time:
Location:
FPH 107
Coalition Building: Reproductive Justice in Albuquerque
Come hear organizers from Respect ABQ Women discuss their experiences building a dynamic and effective grassroots campaign to successfully defeat an Albuquerque Anti-Choice ordinance through deep community engagement, mobilization, and social media outreach.
Speakers (click to view): Angela Ferrell-Zabala, Ricky Hill, Tannia Esparza

Coalition Building: Reproductive Justice in Albuquerque

Speakers

Angela Ferrell-Zabala

Angela currently serves as the Director of Field Operations for RCRC, where she oversees the organizations community organizing, mobilization and movement building work. Angela is passionate about many social justice issues including reproductive justice, racial justice, education, food justice and LGBTQ equality. In her spare time she serves on the board of Youth Pride Alliance and SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective but mostly enjoys spending time with her wife and 12 year old twins.

Ricky Hill

Ricky Hill is a doctoral student and instructor at the University of New Mexico, focusing on health communication within LGBTQQIA communities. They also coordinate economic justice and peer advocacy workshops at the Transgender Resource Center of New Mexico. A proud Oklahoman, Ricky blogs about queer things for Oklahomans for Reproductive Justice.

Tannia Esparza

Tannia Esparza is the Executive Director at Young Women United (YWU), a reproductive justice organization, lead by and for Young Women of Color in Albuquerque, NM. As YWU’s director she ensures organizing, policy, and communications strategies continue to uplift all people in making real decisions about their bodies and lives.
Time:
Location:
ASH 221
Digital Storytelling for Community Mobilization: An Introduction to the Hear Our Stories Project
In this presentation, we will share the Ford Foundation funded Hear Our Stories project, which uses new media to reveal how diasporic youth in Western Massachusetts experience and negotiate sexual health disparities. We prioritize uprooted young parenting women, whose material conditions and cultural worlds have placed them in tenuous positions, both socially constructed and experientially embodied. Existing programs and policies focused on these women fail to use relevant local knowledge and rarely involve them in messaging efforts. In collaboration with project partners, including the Massachusetts Alliance on Teen Pregnancy, we aim to transform assumptions about young parenting women through the novel use of digital storytelling to recalibrate the conversation on young motherhood and sexuality, health, and rights across generations.
Speakers (click to view): Aline Gubrium, Christie Barcelos, Iesha Ramos, Kasey Jernigan, Mim Shafer, Keyla Santiago, Dashira Pomales, Yasmin Figueroa

Digital Storytelling for Community Mobilization: An Introduction to the Hear Our Stories Project

Speakers

Aline Gubrium

Aline Gubrium is an Assistant Professor of Public Health at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Her research uses participatory, digital, visual, and narrative methods to work with marginalized women and youth to explore sexual and reproductive health meanings and practices and to craft community-based programs that promote health from a culture-centered/local and social justice perspective. As a methodological innovation, she uses digital storytelling to engage research participants in reflecting on their sexual and reproductive worldviews, and related aspects of lived experience. From early research with African-American women living in a southern rural community, and work with women using Depo-Provera and other long-term provider controlled methods of contraception, to more recent projects working with Latino/a youth to address barriers to sexual communication and sexuality education, the driving question across the board is how participants view and "make sense" of their own experiences, as well as respond to and confront the myriad influences that shape them.

Christie Barcelos

Christie Barcelos is a doctoral candidate at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Iesha Ramos

Iesha graduated from Hampshire College in May 2013. She is currently working on a Masters of Public Health at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She is a fellow on the Hear Our Stories Ford Foundation Project. She also a board member of the Abortion Rights Fund of Western Massachusetts.

Kasey Jernigan

Jernigan is a PhD student in the Department of Anthropology at the Umass Amherst. Her research is focused on participatory action research with Indigenous and marginalized communities for social justice, health, and well being, focusing on the historical and contemporary social determinants of health. She is currently a Ford Foundation Pre-doc Fellow and a Research Fellow on the Ford Foundation funded project, Hear Our Stories: Diasporic Youth for Sexual Rights and Justice

Mim Shafer

Mim Shafer is an educator for the Youth Action Coalition (coordinating GirlsEyeView, Ware) and a current PhD student at Umass, Amherst working on the Ford Foundation sponsored project "Hear Our Stories: Diasporic Youth for Sexual Rights and Justice". Much of Shafer's work concentrates on the ways in which media can be used to tell stories related to sexual health, identity and well-being.

Keyla Santiago

Keyla Santiago is a 22-year-old mother of two girls. She is from Puerto Rico but lives in Holyoke, MA. She is working on getting her GED and is going to college for culinary arts.

Dashira Pomales

Dashira Pomales is an artist, a recent graduate of the Care Center in Holyoke and the mother a baby son. She loves artwork and has been a part of the Hear Our Stories Project and Women Organizing Across Ages Meetings since June 2013.

Yasmin Figueroa

Yasmin Figueroa is a 22-year-old mother of two boys. She attends the Care Center in Holyoke and in my future I am looking forward to studying Criminal Justice.
Time:
Location:
FPH 106
Don't Leave Your Friends Behind: Supporting Kids & Caregivers in Our Movements
How do we bridge the gap between supporting reproductive justice (and right to family in theory) and the sometimes messy and noisy reality of having caregivers and kids in our movements? How can non-parents and others without children in their day-to-day lives support the families in their movements? We will share our own experiences of being caregivers involved (or struggling to be involved) in social justice organizing, the support we received, and the support we needed but did not receive. Then, the floor will be open for participants to discuss their experiences, ask questions, and strategize how to make our events and movements for change more welcoming and inclusive to all ages.
Speakers (click to view): China Martens, Marianne Bullock, Maegan la Mamita Mala Ortiz

Don't Leave Your Friends Behind: Supporting Kids & Caregivers in Our Movements

Speakers

China Martens

China Martens is the author of The Future Generation: The Zine-book for Subculture Parents, Kids, Friends & Others and the co-editor of Don’t Leave Your Friends Behind: Concrete Ways to Support Families in Social Justice Movements and Communities. Since 2003, China has facilitated workshops to create support for parents and children. She is also a co-founder of Kidz City, a radical childcare collective in Baltimore.

Marianne Bullock

Marianne Bullock is a founder and Lead Doula with The Prison Birth Project. She is apprenticing to be a Certified Professional Midwife and is currently an Ada Comstock Scholar at Smith College studying motherhood, race and confinement. She has worked with MomsRising.org on economic justice and family policy issues at a state and national level.

Maegan la Mamita Mala Ortiz

Maegan la Mamita Mala Ortiz is a NYRican in LA mami media maker and coordinator of Undocutech's #11MillionDreams Storython, Los Angeles.
Time:
Location:
FPH 103
Fighting for Contraceptive Safety in a Time of Restricted Access
Contraceptive methods must be both safe and freely accessible, as part of general health care services, including abortion. Advocating for contraceptive safety means insisting that user health and rights come first in the research, development and provision of contraceptive technologies. In this workshop, we will talk about appropriate feminist activism for contraceptive safety in the face of well-funded global partnerships to promote Depo-Provera in Southern Africa and South Asia. We will talk about the problematic trend of positioning long-acting methods as a way to reduce the need for and availability of abortion. We will discuss how to balance advocacy for contraceptive access and safety without undercutting one or the other. We will brainstorm ways to effectively battle the conservative restrictions on access in the U.S., while exposing the resurgence of population control efforts internationally. Come prepared to discuss!
Speakers (click to view): Anu Manchikanti Gomez, Betsy Hartmann, Jasmine Burnett, Loretta J. Ross, Anne Hendrixson

Fighting for Contraceptive Safety in a Time of Restricted Access

Speakers

Anu Manchikanti Gomez

Anu Manchikanti Gomez, PhD is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the Center for Research and Education on Gender and Sexuality at San Francisco State University. Using social science approaches, Anu aims to employ a reproductive justice lens in research relevant to clinical practice and policy, such as exploring the implications of enthusiasm for promoting use of IUDs and implants to “high-risk” women on reproductive autonomy.

Betsy Hartmann

Betsy Hartmann is the Director of the Population and Development Program and Professor of Development Studies at Hampshire College. A longstanding activist in the international women's health movement, she teaches, writes and speaks about the intersections of population, environment, reproductive rights and security issues. Her books include Reproductive Rights and Wrongs: The Global Politics of Population Control.

Jasmine Burnett

Jasmine Burnett is a Black Feminist, writer, activist and consultant who focuses on sex, sexuality, and reproductive justice to promote sexual liberation and health access for women/womyn of color. She is an organizer for SisterSong NYC and is the National Mobilization Chair for the Trust Black Women Partnership. She is founder, lover, and creatress of Aunt Betty's Basement, a sex positive community on Facebook for women of color that celebrates our fluid sexualities and gender identities. Her work has been featured in the Huffington Post, On the Issues Magazine, and Clutch Magazine's 10 Black Women Teaching Us About Sex.

Loretta J. Ross

Loretta J. Ross was a co-founder and the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012. Ms. Ross is an expert on women’s issues, racism and intolerance, human rights, and violence against women and speaks at many colleges and universities.

Anne Hendrixson

Anne is the Assistant Director of PopDev, the Population & Development Program at Hampshire College, a center on peace, population and the environment at Hampshire College.
Time:
Location:
FPH East Lecture Hall
Food Justice, Sustainability, Worker's Rights
Sustainable food system activists and advocates have long emphasized the environmental consequences of industrialized agriculture. Industrial food systems not only threaten the health of our ecological communities, but also have negative effects on the lives and health of those who work to produce the food we eat – people who are often further marginalized by sexism, racism, poverty, immigration policy, and the forces of global capitalism. This conversation will bring together local and nationally based scholars and activists to discuss the challenges facing workers in our food systems, and recent organizing efforts by these workers and their allies to create sustainable economies and community food systems.
Speakers (click to view): Charlene Galarneau, Jazmine Walker, Catherine Sands

Food Justice, Sustainability, Worker's Rights

Speakers

Charlene Galarneau

Charlene Galarneau is faculty in Women’s and Gender Studies at Wellesley College where her teaching includes feminist bioethics, US public health, and women and health. Her research focuses on health justice and she is writing a book on community justice and US health policy. Charlene is a proud alum of UMass Amherst.

Jazmine Walker

Jazmine specializes in reproductive and agricultural economic justice in the South. Her dedication to public scholarship and activism is driven by a passion to amplify the importance of rural places and communities within US justice movements. You can find her blogging at Still Furious & Brave and in collaboration with Echoing Ida, a Strong Families project.

Catherine Sands

Catherine Sands is a food systems consultant, educator and evaluator, with nearly 30 years experience supporting non-profit organizations nationally and locally in farm to school value chain development, food access and equity, participatory action research and evaluation, food policy and advocacy. She directs Fertile Ground, a regional farm to school initiative, lectures on food justice and policy at U Mass/Amherst, and collaborates with communities to strategize and evaluate community food projects.
Time:
Location:
ASH 111
It's A Class Thing
This interactive workshop will introduce the basics of social class and classism: What is it? Where is it? How does it play out? Group activities, dialogue, and personal reflection will give participants a dynamic way to learn about class, identify systemic examples of classism, and reflect on social class identity in order to bring the topic of class into our communities and movements so we can advance economic and racial justice at its intersection with reproductive justice. Participants will walk away with specific action plans to use in their organizing.
Speakers (click to view): Rachel Rybaczuk

It's A Class Thing

Speakers

Rachel Rybaczuk

Rachel Rybaczuk grew up poor in a racially/ethnically diverse neighborhood in Miami. As the only person in her family to attend college, issues of class and race became the guiding forces of her experience. She consults with and leads trainings/workshops for activists, educators, and students in grassroots organizations, non-profits, and educational settings about oppression with an emphasis on class(ism) and race(ism), highlighting the intersections of all forms of oppression (via makingclassmatter.org).
Time:
Location:
FPH 104
Organizing for Reproductive Justice in Religious Communities
For many of us, our activist work is informed by our religious beliefs. But how can we reconcile this work with leadership structures that are often hostile to our politics? Join panelists from diverse faith backgrounds as we connect our spiritual lives to reproductive justice, abortion rights, and LGBTQ justice, and how we bring those views back to our home communities while respecting others' beliefs.
Speakers (click to view): Liza M. Neal, Toni M. Bond Leonard, Rev. Emma Akpan

Organizing for Reproductive Justice in Religious Communities

Speakers

Liza M. Neal

Liza Neal is the Director of Spiritual Life at Hampshire College where she labors to explode the boundaries of how we understand ourselves and the world we live in. She studied dance, writing, and religion at Hampshire College followed by mysticism and liberation theologies at Yale Divinity School. She is an ordained UCC minister, writer, partner, and mother.

Toni M. Bond Leonard

Toni M. Bond Leonard is the Co-Founder and former President/CEO of Black Women for Reproductive Justice. Toni was one of several Black women who coined the phrase, Reproductive Justice, which laid the foundation for a whole new framework to advance reproductive health and rights. A skilled strategist, she has served on the boards and advisory committees of numerous organizations, including, the National Network of Abortion Funds, SisterSong, the Trust Black Women Partnership, and the Guttmacher Institute. In addition to her work, Toni is pursing her Masters of Arts in Theological Studies, with a focus on Liberation/Womanist Theology and Religion, Ethics, and Society.

Rev. Emma Akpan

Rev. Emma Akpan is an ordained deacon in the African Methodist Episcopal Church. She is a activist and writer living in Raleigh, NC and writes on the intersection of spirituality and social justice on her blog emmanism.com.
Time:
Location:
JLC 131
REMIX! People of Color Talk Transforming Masculinities
This workshop is for people color only. Mixed/bi-racial/multi-racial folks welcome! This space was created to have a more intentional space for us to talk with each other. The conversations are designed to expand the way we understand gender beyond a binary of femininity and masculinity; and to offer a political framework that looks at the effects of masculinity socially and politically in our movements and organizations. We will look at strategies for addressing masculine privilege by sharing our stories of sexual & gender liberation in order to move masculinity from a place of power and control to a place of gender sovereignty and transformation. This workshop is open to ALL gender expressions and sexual orientations.
Speakers (click to view): Ashe Helm-Hernandez, Lucia Leandro Gimeno

REMIX! People of Color Talk Transforming Masculinities

Speakers

Ashe Helm-Hernandez

Ashe Helm-Hernandez is a member of Southerners On New Ground, (S.O.N.G.) & Alpha Psi Kappa Fraternity, Inc., the nation's largest nonprofit LGBT Greek organization specifically for dominant lesbians.

Lucia Leandro Gimeno

Lucia Leandro Gimeno is a Social Worker who just moved to Atlanta, GA after working in New York City for 13 years doing organizing with LGBTQ communities of color. He was a founding board member of FIERCE and former staff at The Audre Lorde Project. Lucia Leandro is a graduate of Hampshire and was also part of Ping Chong' s Undesirable Elements play Secret Suvivors, a play about adult survivors of child sexual abuse. Lucia Leandro is also a future full-spectrum doula.
Time:
Location:
JLC 120
Red Tide Rising: Street Theater as an Organizing Tool for Reproductive Justice
Red Tide Rising is a street performance from the Body Ecology Performance Ensemble centering the experience of Black women, sexuality, and safety. Developed using materials from sexual education, love songs, and personal experiences, this piece was created to incite community discussion. During the workshop, participants will be led by ensemble members to create micro performances around their own experiences of safety, self-love, and envisioning a pleasurable, safe, and affirming world. The workshop will conclude with a conversation about how performance can be used in our local communities to support organizing efforts and popular public education.
Speakers (click to view): Jessica Valoris, Sydette Harry, Taja Lindley

Red Tide Rising: Street Theater as an Organizing Tool for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Jessica Valoris

Jessica Valoris is a visual artist, performing artist, and poet who embraces art as a way to explore our ancestral, cultural, and personal stories and to create new ones. An associate artists with the Body Ecology Performance Ensemble, Jessica believes in the power of art to activate our imaginations and spark inspired action.

Sydette Harry

Sydette is a proud member of Body Ecology, a writer, and a lover of Black girls.

Taja Lindley

Taja is a self-taught multi-media tactile visual artist, performer, full-spectrum doula and reproductive justice activist inspired by women and girls of color. Taja is the founder of Colored Girls Hustle. http://www.coloredgirlshustle.com/
Time:
Location:
MDB Recital Hall
Strategies for Advancing Abortion Access in the US
Access to safe and legal abortion is becoming increasingly more restricted, especially for the most vulnerable people in our society. Panelists will talk about current threats and barriers to access, including TRAP laws, clinic closings, and parental involvement laws, show the impact on those in under-served and marginalized communities, and discuss activist strategies to resist the threats and increase access by organizing at the grassroots and national levels under the broad call for reproductive justice.
Speakers (click to view): Marlene Gerber Fried, Rocío Villalobos, Agata Pelka

Strategies for Advancing Abortion Access in the US

Speakers

Marlene Gerber Fried

A long-time reproductive rights activist, Marlene Gerber Fried (PhD, Brown) is well known nationally and internationally as a writer, lecturer, and advocate for reproductive freedom. She was founding president of the National Network of Abortion Funds and served on the board of the Women's Global Network for Reproductive Rights for over a decade, where she continues to work closely with their international abortion advocacy project. As Faculty Director, Marlene leads CLPP's academic programming, teaching and student advising; her courses include "The Politics of the Abortion Debate" and "Reproductive Rights: Domestic and International Perspectives." She edited "From Abortion to Reproductive Freedom: Transforming a Movement" and co-authored "Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice", and co-authored the chapter on Abortion in several editions of "Our Bodies, Ourselves." She was the Interim President of Hampshire College in 2010-2011.

Rocío Villalobos

Rocío Villalobos is an advisor and the Social Justice Education and Leadership Coordinator at the UT-Austin Multicultural Engagement Center. In addition to her organizing work with Rise Up Texas, Rocío is a board member at the Women’s Community Center of Central Texas and the YWCA Greater Austin. She also volunteers with the immigrant rights coalition Texans United for Families, coordinates a visitation program to a detention center, and is a collective member with MonkeyWrench Books.

Agata Pelka

Agata Pelka is the RJ Fellow at the National Abortion Federation and serves as the President of the Law Students for Reproductive Justice Board of Directors. She graduated from UNC School of Law in May 2013. Throughout law school, Agata worked on a project to evaluate the implementation of North Carolina’s judicial bypass laws with the support of NARAL Pro-Choice North Carolina.
Time:
Location:
FPH Main Lecture Hall
The Familiar Made Strange: An Exploration of Disability Justice and Access in Our Racial, Economic and Multi-Issue JusticeWork
The collision of disability, economic, and racial justice are inseparable in the lived experiences of poverty, the struggles of First Nations peoples for sovereignty, work-related injuries, homelessness, sterilization, immigration, police brutality and more. Come join members of the national Disability Justice Collective (DJC) as we explore the ways ableism and disability impact our varied communities and discuss tools we can incorporate into our lives and organizing to ensure more effective collaborations with disability community.
Speakers (click to view): Akemi Nishida, Charone Pagett, Collette Carter, Stephanie Infante, Sebastian Margaret, Kay Ulanday Barrett

The Familiar Made Strange: An Exploration of Disability Justice and Access in Our Racial, Economic and Multi-Issue JusticeWork

Speakers

Akemi Nishida

Akemi is part of Disability Justice Collective, a nation wide organization which promotes disability justice. Akemi is also a part of a NYC disability community and currently a graduate student in the Critical Social Personality Psychology program at The Graduate Center, The City University of New York.

Charone Pagett

Charone Pagett has spent well over twenty years learning and doing human rights work. She joined the Disability Justice Collective and found her home. Having a disability since birth, she is well versed in disability culture and using that culture to bring disabled people to every social justice table.

Collette Carter

Collette Carter is a self-identified black queer fat femme activist who believes at the heart of lasting movement-building is the work of making spaces which help us sustain hope and the possibility for survival, as well as transformation. A graduate of Spelman College c96, Collette brings over fifteen years experience with community-led organization, and program and leadership development.

Stephanie Infante

Stephanie is part of The Disability Justice Collective, an organization that promotes disability justice and equality. Stephanie is a recent graduate of The CUNY School of Professional Studies, where she obtained a master's degree in Disability Studies. Stephanie is also the Founder of The A.L.L. Campaign, a campaign to help an end to bullying, bigotry and random acts of violence.

Sebastian Margaret

Sebastian Margaret is a disability justice community educator and a disabled Trans* queer immigrant who is kept deliciously exhausted parenting a pair of gorgeous kids. A seasoned facilitator Sebastian’s work seeks to insert disability justice into the progressive left and progressive multi–issue politics into the disability community. Co-founder of the Disability Justice Collective they are passionate about the validity and glory of imperfect bodies and minds.

Kay Ulanday Barrett

2013 Trans Justice Funding Project Panelist and 2013 Trans 100 Honoree, Kay Ulanday Barrett is an poet, performer, and educator, as a disabled pin@y-amerikan trans queer amerikan. Featured in Princeton University, The Chicago Historical Society, and various queer collectives nationwide, K. is committed to liberation and art. His work has featured in Poor Magazine, Make/Shift, Asian Americans For Progress, and Bitch Magazine. kaybarrett.net
Time:
Location:
FPH Faculty Lounge
The Intersections of Immigrant Rights and Reproductive Justice
Immigration status has a significant impact on a person’s ability to exercise their reproductive freedom. Current immigration policy puts reproductive justice far out of reach: pulling parents away from their children and forcing them to raise families without dignity, keeping LGBT couples apart, forcing women to deliver children in shackles, and denying people affordable health insurance for up to 15 years. Come learn about the current immigration landscape and strategize about how to make reproductive justice accessible to all, regardless of immigration status.
Speakers (click to view): Shivana Jorawar, Zeinab Eyega, Joy Messinger, Natalie D. Camastra

The Intersections of Immigrant Rights and Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Shivana Jorawar

J.D., Reproductive Justice Program Director at the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum (NAPAWF)

Zeinab Eyega

Zeinab Eyega, MSc. Executive Director of Sauti Yetu Center for African Women and Families, a community based social service organization based in the South Bronx, New York. Ms. Eyega manages the day to day functioning of the organizations as well as guiding its strategic directions. In addition to teaching and speaking, Ms. Eyega has facilitated numerous cross-cultural competency training workshops for healthcare providers and reproductive health promotion seminars for immigrant women and girls across the U.S. She has a BA from the School for International Training in Brattleboro, Vermont and a Master of Social Science from the New School University in New York.

Joy Messinger

Joy is a reproductive, birth, and social justice activist working at the intersections of adolescent sexuality and youth development in Chicago, IL. When she’s not working, Joy is active with local and national feminist, LGBTQ, and Asian American organizing and activism. Joy believes in pushing the boundaries of inclusivity, building queer people of color community and chosen family, and cooking delicious food for everyone she knows.

Natalie D. Camastra

Natalie D. Camastra serves as Policy Analyst with the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH) in their Washington, D.C. office. In her role, she advances NLIRH’s national policy agenda by analyzing federal and state legislation, crafting policy solutions, and implementing short- and long-term policy projects. Specifically, Natalie focuses on federal legislation and strategies to advance reproductive health and justice for immigrant Latinas, their families, and communities.
Time:
Location:
FPH West Lecture Hall

Sunday 9:00AM - 10:30AM

Confronting Sizeism
This workshop will focus on fatness as a social identity and sizeism as a system of oppression. Participants will learn the basics of fat oppression and it how operates through institutions such as the medical system, media, diet and fashion industries. Participants will examine how fat oppression intersects with other -isms (racism, sexism, capitalism, etc), and give historical context about the rise of fat oppression as an aesthetic concern before fatness was ever considered a medical issue. This workshop will also offer insight into how sizeism operates in activist communities, specifically in food justice movements, and discuss solutions to combat sizeism and make our spaces commit to fighting sizeism.
Speakers (click to view): Irissa Baxter, Cora Segal

Confronting Sizeism

Speakers

Irissa Baxter

Irissa Baxter is a final semester Div III at Hampshire College working on art history and Holocaust studies. She is a white, fat, cisgender woman who advocates for fat positivity. Our current culture ingrains ideas of a specific idealized appearance that is not conducive to personal growth and self love, and Irissa believes that this model must be shunned and personal diversities in appearance embraced.

Cora Segal

Cora Segal is an activist originally from Boston, who is currently studying at Hampshire College in Western MA. She was first introduced to social justice through youth-led community-based groups in the Boston area, such as the City School and Sub/Urban Justice. From here, she developed feminist, fat liberation, anti racist, and anti capitalist perspectives, which she believes all play an integral role in working towards collective liberation. As a fatty, she's very eager to see fat justice and all its intersections with gender, race, disability, queer/trans liberation, class, and anti capitalism, become part of radical movements. She currently organizes with various groups in the Pioneer Valley.
Time:
Location:
FPH Faculty Lounge
Economic Justice and Worker's Rights
This past year has seen a tidal wave of activism and leadership from the ground up on worker’s rights, from nationwide fast food strikes to the success of domestic worker wage campaigns. With minimum wage legislation becoming a priority agenda item for this administration, the time is right for real and lasting change to the way we pay, benefit, and value the labor of low wage workers. For those of us who are operating as allies, how do we engage with, support, and lift up the voices of the most marginalized in these campaigns? Hear from organizers, funders, and activists at the local, state, and national levels on their work.
Speakers (click to view): Katie Joaquin, Sara K. Gould, Aubretia (Windy) Edick

Economic Justice and Worker's Rights

Speakers

Katie Joaquin

Katie Joaquin was born in the Philippines, raised in a family of domestic workers, and has been organizing immigrant women workers for the past 8 years. As a lead organizer for Filipino Advocates for Justice, she provided leadership development and strategic campaign support for immigrant workers, helping them win wage theft settlements totaling over $1,000,000. Now Campaign Director for the California Domestic Workers Coalition, Katie organized thousands of workers and supporters to win the California Domestic Worker Bill of Rights. @cadomesticwrker

Sara K. Gould

Sara is the Activist-in-Residence at Smith College for the Spring, 2014 semester. She is the former president & CEO of the Ms. Foundation for Women, where she worked for 25 years. Most recently, she was the associate director of Caring Across Generations, a national campaign led by the National Domestic Workers Alliance and Jobs with Justice. Sara is on the boards of the National Immigration Law Center and the Proteus Fund.

Aubretia (Windy) Edick

Aubretia works at Walmart and is a proud member of OUR Walmart. Aubretia has worked at Walmart for 13 years and has spoken out about Walmart for the last 9 or 10 years.
Time:
Location:
FPH 101
Environment and Climate Justice
This panel will explore the intersections between environmental, climate, and gender and racial justice. Speakers will highlight efforts that advance just solutions to environmental problems, including climate change, in the U.S. and internationally.
Speakers (click to view): Asa Needle, Jacqui Patterson, Senti Sojwal, Dr. M. K. Dorsey

Environment and Climate Justice

Speakers

Asa Needle

Asa Needle is member of the Stone Soup Community Center, as well as the Worcester Solidarity and Green Economy(SAGE) Alliance. He has presented at conferences on both coasts on co-operative business, youth empowerment, and environmental justice.

Jacqui Patterson

Jacqueline Patterson is the co-founder and convener of Women of Color United as well as the Director of the NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program. She has a history of working in the areas of gender justice, disability rights, racial justice, economic justice, and health justice domestically and internationally.

Senti Sojwal

Senti Sojwal is a fourth-year student at Hampshire College from NYC concentrating in women's and gender studies and creative writing. She has been involved with CLPP for the past three years and is a co-chair this year for the conference's outreach committee.

Dr. M. K. Dorsey

Dr. Michael Dorsey is a recognized expert on global governance and sustainability. For decades Dr. Dorsey has advised governments, foundations, firms and others on the interplay of multilateral environmental, finance and economic development matters. In July 2010 Lisa Jackson, the US Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) Administrator, appointed Dr. Dorsey to the EPA’s National Advisory Committee (NAC). She reappointed him to the US-EPA NAC in 2012.
Time:
Location:
FPH 103
Exposing Crisis Pregnancy Centers on a Local, State & National level
Crisis Pregnancy Centers (CPCs) are anti-choice centers across the nation that often lie to women about abortion, sex education & birth control. This panel will describe ways that activists can get involved both legislatively and on the ground. Katie Stack, from the Crisis Project, will talk about what she has learned from her undercover investigations of CPCs across the country. Feminist Majority Foundation will cover best practices on raising awareness about CPCs in college environments. NARAL Pro-Choice America & NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts will discuss their extensive research and legislative work around CPCs in addition to talk about their grassroots advocacy.
Speakers (click to view): Celia Segel, Katie Stack, Kristy Birchard, K. Travis Ballie

Exposing Crisis Pregnancy Centers on a Local, State & National level

Speakers

Celia Segel

Celia Segel joined the staff of NARAL Pro-Choice Massachusetts in January 2013. She brings years of organizing experience both in legislative and electoral campaigns.

Katie Stack

Katie Stack is a writer, speaker and advocate with a background in community organizing, abortion care and reproductive health advocacy. In 2010 she shared her own abortion experience on MTV’s 16 and Pregnant special “No Easy Decision”. Katie speaks regularly on college campuses about the importance of reproductive freedom and works as a Patient Advocate at Preterm in Cleveland, OH.

Kristy Birchard

Kristy Birchard is a National Campus Organizer for the Feminist Majority Foundation. She graduated from Kutztown University with a degree in Electronic Media and Political Science. She was a student activist while concentrating on feminist film production and international relations. At FMF, she worked in Albuquerque to help strike down the anti-choice abortion measure and currently works with Mid-Atlantic and Northeast student groups to create strong feminist networks.

K. Travis Ballie

Travis is the Manager of Affiliate & National Programs for NARAL Pro-Choice America. He is responsible for providing support for NARAL’s 22 affiliates, chapter, & choice action team. Travis also runs NARAL’s DC Volunteer Program, as well as the Choice Out Loud – On Campus millennial engagement program. He is a graduate of American University (’10) with a Double B.A. In International Relations & International Business.
Time:
Lifetimes of Activism
They created the term "reproductive justice", and housing, sex education, international training and capacity building programs; helped run an underground railroad before Roe through which thousands of women safely obtained illegal abortions; founded the first women's HIV/AIDS organization in the Southeast, and SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective; and directed the March for Women's Lives, then the largest protest march in US history. They are researchers, writers and academics, radio hosts, service providers and activists, grandmothers and great-grandmothers who are leading global campaigns for women's health, national advocacy for abortion funds and feminist women’s health centers providing contraceptive and reproductive health services and education to all communities, while championing the leadership of women of color, indigenous women, and women living with HIV under the premise that having control over your own body is the most basic of rights. Come to hear about their experiences and what they are doing now.
Speakers (click to view): Laura Kaplan, Toni M. Bond Leonard, Loretta J. Ross, Dazon Dixon Diallo, Katrina Maczen-Cantrell

Lifetimes of Activism

Speakers

Laura Kaplan

Toni M. Bond Leonard

Toni M. Bond Leonard is the Co-Founder and former President/CEO of Black Women for Reproductive Justice. Toni was one of several Black women who coined the phrase, Reproductive Justice, which laid the foundation for a whole new framework to advance reproductive health and rights. A skilled strategist, she has served on the boards and advisory committees of numerous organizations, including, the National Network of Abortion Funds, SisterSong, the Trust Black Women Partnership, and the Guttmacher Institute. In addition to her work, Toni is pursing her Masters of Arts in Theological Studies, with a focus on Liberation/Womanist Theology and Religion, Ethics, and Society.

Loretta J. Ross

Loretta J. Ross was a co-founder and the National Coordinator of the SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective from 2005-2012. Ms. Ross is an expert on women’s issues, racism and intolerance, human rights, and violence against women and speaks at many colleges and universities.

Dazon Dixon Diallo

Dázon Dixon Diallo is a visionary advocate in the struggle for women’s human rights and reproductive justice, and the fight against HIV/AIDS on behalf of communities of women living with HIV and those at risk for HIV and STIs. Dr. Diallo is Founder and President of SisterLove, Inc, established in 1989, the first women’s HIV/AIDS and RJ organization in the southeastern United States.

Katrina Maczen-Cantrell

Katrina Maczen-Cantrell, Western Shoshone, serves as Associate Executive Director of Women’s Health Specialists, a coalition of feminist women’s health centers in Northern California. Cantrell works toward the pursuit of cultural self-determination for indigenous and marginalized people while providing contraceptive and reproductive health services including abortion, to all communities.
Time:
Location:
FPH Main Lecture Hall
Taking Root in Flyover Country: Building Networks for Reproductive Justice
Between hostile cultural climates and legislation targeted at the most marginalized, one of a red state organizer’s most pronounced barriers is isolation. Using examples of our own collaboration with each other, other red state organizers, the Take Root conference, and even coastal collaborations, we will facilitate a conversation about the importance of growing networks for red state reproductive justice and best practices for overcoming organizer isolation and nurturing relationships.
Speakers (click to view): Ricky Hill, Sandra Criswell, yucca bianca westrup

Taking Root in Flyover Country: Building Networks for Reproductive Justice

Speakers

Ricky Hill

Ricky Hill is a doctoral student and instructor at the University of New Mexico, focusing on health communication within LGBTQQIA communities. They also coordinate economic justice and peer advocacy workshops at the Transgender Resource Center of New Mexico. A proud Oklahoman, Ricky blogs about queer things for Oklahomans for Reproductive Justice.

Sandra Criswell

Sandra Criswell is a red state organizer who hangs her hat in Wichita and her heart in Oklahoma City. She blogs, edits, and serves on the board at Oklahomans for Reproductive Justice (OK4RJ) and is the Director of Communications at Trust Women. She is also one of the red state weirdos behind Take Root: Red State Perspectives on Reproductive Justice Conference.

yucca bianca westrup

yucca is a chican@ queerdo from the borderlands of South Texas and is currently organizing with the Cicada Collective. They are a Generative Fellow with CoreAlign, a full-spectrum doula in training, and have big dreams of learning how to make pottery. yucca’s interests include bridging gaps between reproductive and environmental justice, and staying in Texas for the long run.
Time:
Location:
FPH East Lecture Hall
We're All Media Makers: Using Storytelling & Creativity to Make Change
Effective storytelling has always been a critical part of messaging, but it is even more important when it comes to engaging people -- especially young people -- on important political issues. People want to get involved with campaigns that reflect their values, and we know that no story exists in a box. We'll discuss how the reproductive justice movement can be strengthened by including and focusing on more than just "abortion stories," but rather stories that reflect the reality of real people with complex lives and identities.
Speakers (click to view): Maegan la Mamita Mala Ortiz, Nayantara Sen, Rogelio Alejandro Lopez, Sarah La Due

We're All Media Makers: Using Storytelling & Creativity to Make Change

Speakers

Maegan la Mamita Mala Ortiz

Maegan la Mamita Mala Ortiz is a NYRican in LA mami media maker and coordinator of Undocutech's #11MillionDreams Storython, Los Angeles.

Nayantara Sen

Nayantara is an Associate Racial Justice Trainer at RaceForward, and a Program Associate at Crossing Borders, Bridging Generations, an oral history project about mixed-heritage identity politics. Her research at NYU Gallatin focuses on fiction and storytelling by women of color, postcolonial and immigrant literature and social change movements. Currently she is developing a multi-genre arts collective that explores connections between anti-capitalism, labor and reproductive liberation.

Rogelio Alejandro Lopez

Rogelio Alejandro Lopez has worked as a researcher, media maker, and activist at the intersection of media and social justice with the MIT Center for Civic Media. Much of his work has focused on the role of media in activism and social movements among immigrants, people of color, and politically disenfranchised groups. Currently, he works with the Youth and Media research group at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard, were he will focus on how media influence participation and engagement among urban youth. Additionally, Rogelio is working with Emerson's Engagement Game Lab to explore how community organizations can use media to connect with constituents and better communicate with local governments.

Sarah La Due

Sarah La Due is the Assistant Director of Public Affairs in NARAL Pro-Choice America's San Francisco office. She has a strong background in politics and communications. Sarah is especially proud of her work at NARAL doing Millennial outreach and in the campaign to expose fake clinics, also known as "crisis pregnancy centers."
Time:
Location:
FPH 102
What If We Let Roe Go?
This is a community conversation to question our orthodoxies, analyze our strategies and brainstorm together about how to build more effective power for abortion access. It is a time for reproductive health, rights and justice activists to explore what our movement would look like if we were willing to step back from the conventional (i.e. legislative, litigation and policy) strategies to protect and expand abortion access. Could we approach the work differently? What would we gain and what would we lose? Is it even possible to re-think the way we do the work, or are we too far down this path?
Speakers (click to view): Angela Ferrell-Zabala, Julia Reticker-Flynn, Kimberly Inez McGuire, Aimée Thorne-Thomsen

What If We Let Roe Go?

Speakers

Angela Ferrell-Zabala

Angela currently serves as the Director of Field Operations for RCRC, where she oversees the organizations community organizing, mobilization and movement building work. Angela is passionate about many social justice issues including reproductive justice, racial justice, education, food justice and LGBTQ equality. In her spare time she serves on the board of Youth Pride Alliance and SisterSong Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective but mostly enjoys spending time with her wife and 12 year old twins.

Julia Reticker-Flynn

Julia Reticker-Flynn is the Associate Director of Organizing and Mobilization at Advocates for Youth, where she works with young people across the country to advocate for cultural and policy change that supports young people’s sexual health and rights. She currently serves on the Board of Directors of Nursing Students for Choice.

Kimberly Inez McGuire

Kimberly Inez McGuire is the Associate Director of Government Relations and Public Affairs for the National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health. Kimberly coordinates the public affairs and communications work of NLIRH, conducts policy analysis and legislative advocacy, and works closely with the NLIRH team to promote salud, dignidad, y justicia for Latin@s nationwide. Kimberly is a reproductive justice advocate and public policy professional with several years’ experience in legislative relations and strategic communications. Previously, Kimberly worked as Senior Associate for Programs and Policy at the Reproductive Health Technologies Project, where she managed a ground-breaking research project on Latin@ attitudes on abortion. Kimberly writes and presents on a range of issues, including: abortion access and affordability; immigrant women’s health and rights; health equity; contraceptive technologies; and environmental justice.

Aimée Thorne-Thomsen

Aimée Thorne-Thomsen is Vice President for Strategic Partnerships at Advocates for Youth, which champions policies and programs to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. In that capacity, she oversees and coordinates the development, implementation, and evaluation of Advocates’ strategic partnerships with youth activists and colleague organizations, including those in the social and reproductive justice movements.
Time:
Location:
FPH West Lecture Hall